The Disney 52 Animated Challenge: Year-Long Activity! NOW PLAYING: Nightmare Before Christmas

Discussion in 'DPF Game Room' started by MerlinEmrys, Dec 15, 2017.

  1. MerlinEmrys

    MerlinEmrys Hicitus Pinicus!

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    The D52 Chat is open. :) If you click "Chat" at the top, there should be a + tab next to the General Chat tab. Click that and you'll can choose the Disney 52 Challenge Room. :) Hope to see some of you there!
     
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  2. pincrazy

    pincrazy Active Member

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    Sorry Group, tried to get in on Chat, but I'm all ?? bout getting in it, my signal just isn't that great. Bummed, i know it's gonna be entertaining!
     
  3. Addicted to Alice Pins

    Addicted to Alice Pins My name is Ann, and I'm here to enable you!

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    Please excuse the interruption, but it's related to Peter Pan (just not Disney, haha). All the discussion of the characters, particularly Tink, leads me to think that some of you might enjoy the Wendy Darling book trilogy by Colleen Oakes.

    It is for teens, but it's very well written and is essentially a darker telling of the tale. The story follows the basic outline we're used to and yet has been turned on its head in key ways. The characterizations are really interesting -- the core traits are the same, but the altering of circumstances leads to changes in motivation, etc.

    There is an entire subgenre of "twisted fairytales" these days, and not all of them are worth a thinking person's time. But this trilogy was fantastic. I plan to re-read it eventually -- not something I do often. So if you like Pan and/or these types of reimaginings, I recommend you read it.

    I now return you to your vigorous discussion!
     
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  4. MerlinEmrys

    MerlinEmrys Hicitus Pinicus!

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    [​IMG]
    Lady and the Tramp (1955)

    Since I'm assuming most people will take Monday as the watch day, or at least won't have the analysis completed (and since I'm so late in posting this...) I am allowing Monday as a "wrap-up" discussion on Peter Pan. So you're welcome to respond to other analyses throughout the day.

    However, you may not post any more full analyses for Peter Pan to count for completion toward the 52 Challenge. No late homework. ;P

    ~Merlin
     
    Last edited: Mar 4, 2018
  5. watzshakinbacon

    watzshakinbacon B for Belle or B for bacon?

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    Aww I’ll have to miss it this week. Just touched down in Denver!


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  6. Meritre

    Meritre Active Member

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    *sight* I was already asleep then :( beeing at least six hours ahead - sitting in Europe) But I do hope to join in when there is a holiday and I can stay up late without falling asleep at school next day. :)
     
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  7. xdattax

    xdattax Well-Known Member

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    1. What is your overall impression of the film?

    The first dog film! How wonderful! So I’m quite the fan of the Disney dogs, see my pretty purse?

    [​IMG]

    Granted I got this one specifically for Dodger’s placement, but L&T are pretty good too. Anyway, I digress. The art is gorgeous, the pretty scenes and the dirty scenes. I could almost smell the muck as Trusty was tracking the pound wagon.

    2. Choose one specific character to analyze.
    Ah, Miss Lady. Lady is presented as the perfect Edwardian pup owned by the perfect Edwardian couple. As a puppy before given her speaking voice is she is right out of the puppy hand book, curious but unhappy to be left alone. Have you raised a puppy lately? There’s a reason Saki sleeps with either my mom or me. Her naivety even as a full grown dog is sweet, she’s a very sheltered Cocker compared to the street wise and slightly wiseass Tramp. I couldn’t help but feel for her when she heard about Trixie, Lulu, and Chiquita, even though Peg was just trying to make conversation, as i don’t think Peg knew about L&T’s going out. Oh! The drama!

    3. Choose one specific scene or sequence to analyze—tell me what response is it trying to evoke from the viewer and how does it go about getting that response?
    The tracking sequence is a truly suspenseful bit in the Disney catalog so far. Unlike the case scene in Cinderella, where in all reality it would have worked out for Cindy, here, the dark and foreboding brown, Black, and slightly green streets, mud, muck, and bullet at the end of the line for Tramp heighten the stakes. It seems like a bit of plot armor that Trusty is actually able to track, but perhaps he always could. After all, some of the best people he tracked were jailbirds. Plus, the wagon wreck at the end left you with fear that the loyal bloodhound didn’t make it, especially since Jock mentioned they were older dogs.

    4. Choose one song to analyze
    Oh those damned cats. I am Siamese is a song that plays in my head frequently, it’s probably the one I know best from the movie. Given the US’s interest in the Oriental at in the early 1900s the fact that Aunt Sarah has two exotic cats is not surprising. However, the fact they’re shifty eyed, cunning, and pretty much assholes also reflects the US’s attitude to many of the Asian immigrants. People in the 1800s and i to the 1900s didn’t trust Asians and Si and Am and their song are reflective of those feelings. Surprisingly they’re not in the movie much, but so incredibly loved as cats/villains.


    7. What is this film’s overall goal?

    I think this might have been an early adopt a dog move, but that may be giving the writers and animators too much credit, though the pound does have a give a dog a Home sign. I think a more realistic goal is the love conquers all theme. Tramp loves Lady and understands why she won’t run off with him and even goes to save the baby when she can’t, which almost led to him going to his death (no good deed, right?). But, in the end Jimdear and Darling come home and right the wrongs set in motion by Aunt Sarah (who, if we were to say the goal was to communicate, failed and was failed since she should have been told Lady loves and is protective her little human).

    10. What single pin do you think best represents this film for you?

    [​IMG]

    The spaghetti scene. Duh. It’s hands down one of Disney’s most iconic images, period. No love montage is complete without meatballs!


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  8. Ajk

    Ajk New to DPF but not to trading

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    Of course she does! She’s a dog! ;)
     
  9. watzshakinbacon

    watzshakinbacon B for Belle or B for bacon?

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    I love that Disney dogs purse!!! I never really clicked with any of the D&B purses until that one, but now aftermarket prices are so high


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  10. unibear

    unibear DPF Charter Member DPF Charter Member

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    We finally hit the movie with my darlings, my precious pets, Si & Am (to quote Aunt Sarah)!

    1. My overall impression of the movie… Several things:

    • Si & Am are only in one scene! For the impact they have in Disney lore (and pins), they aren’t in the movie much and don’t do much. More on this later…
    • Disney sure loves the Victorian era as a plot time for its movies. The houses, furnishing, clothes (spats on Jim Dear and Darling’s feet), etc.
    • Tramp’s diatribe on babies at the beginning of the movie reminds me of Professor Harold Hill: “We’ve got trouble, right here in River City, and that starts with ‘T’ and that rhymes with ‘B’ and that stands for BABIES!”
    • Tramp is watching his carbs!! When we scopes out breakfast, he looks at the pastry shop and says, “Francois? Nope, too much starch!”
    • When they have the baby, there is a scene of “baby bottles” and I noticed that they were using Erlenmeyer flasks (like we use in our chemistry labs) with nipples as baby bottles!
    • The Beaver sounds exactly like Gopher from Winnie the Pooh, even including the whistling through buck teeth as he talks!
    • Lady & Tramp remind me of Princess Leia & Han Solo. A lady of royalty and fine breeding in love with a man who is explicitly called a “scoundrel”—Han by Leia (“Sometimes you think I'm all right.” “Occasionally, maybe… when you aren’t acting like a scoundrel.” “You like me because I'm a scoundrel. There aren't enough scoundrels in your life.”), Tramp by Peg in her song (“He’s a tramp; he’s a scoundrel.”).
    •While this movie is pro-dog, it can’t seem to do that without being anti-cat. Now, only Si & Am are shown, but implies that all cats are “evil”, and they weren’t even black cats… (Siamese = half-black, so half-evil?)


    2. I chose to analyze Aunt Sarah. While Si & Am are widely viewed as the villains (or even the rat), they are simply acting on instinct (more later), but Aunt Sarah should know better. Don’t tell the pin makers that Si & Am aren’t villains (I don’t want more Aunt Sarah pins…).

    First off, what kind of parents are Jim Dear and Darling that they leave their newborn infant with someone else while they take a vacation for a day or two? REALLY? Was that common in the Victorian era? That would be tough to justify now… And then, Jim Dear & Darling can just up-and-go and leave their newborn with Aunt Sarah, but she can’t leave Si & Am at home for a few days so she takes them to a strange house? I call BS…

    I vaguely remember Aunt Sarah taking Lady to the pound, and thinking “What kind of house guest (VILLAIN!) would do that?” Of course, my rememberings were wrong. While Aunt Sarah does some questionable things, I don’t really see her as a villain either, just misguided.

    The major issue is that while Jim Dear & Darling view Lady as part of the family (as seen by the touching scene with Jim Dear, Darling, & Lady at the baby’s crib), Aunt Sarah does not share that view. Is this because Si & Am convinced her that Lady is trouble, or because cat-people (especially old “cat-ladies” like Aunt Sarah) aren’t supposed to like dogs?

    So when Si & Am tangle with Lady, Aunt Sarah goes to buy her a muzzle. How about just keeping the cats and dog in separate parts of the house? Her response is a bit extreme, and perhaps intended to add tension/drama (give Lady a way to escape without running away from *her home*)?

    The next time we see Aunt Sarah, she has tied up Lady and a rat decides to enter the baby’s room. The goal of this is to heighten tension, allow Tramp to be heroic, and to set up the dire consequences of Tramp being sent to the pound as a baby attacker. So, if Aunt Sarah is a villain, it’s based on her misunderstanding the situations and not because she is inherently evil, like the Evil Queen or Maleficent.

    This is driven home at the end of the movie (Christmas scene) when Jim Dear mentions that Aunt Sarah sent dog biscuits to them for Christmas. “Bad” character perfectly redeemed because now she likes dogs. A bit heavy-handed, but oh well…

    4. I chose The Siamese Cat Song—“We are Siamese if you please; we are Siamese if you don’t please.”

    This is an iconic scene, and introduces my poor little innocent angels, Si & Am (Aunt Sarah again). The goal of this song is to introduce Si & Am as villains (cat bashing!!).

    What I notice as I listen to the lyrics and animated scenes is that all of their “villainous” behavior is about getting food—climbing the bird cage, spilling the fish bowl, being interested in the baby because “where we are finding baby, there are milk nearby”. This is basically cats acting on their instinct to find food. What’s interesting is that Tramp begging merchants/random homes to find food, and hints of knocking over trash cans is treated as “dogs will be dogs”, but somehow cats trying to find food is villainous.

    I think the animators tried to push Si & Am over the top by making them fake injuries to garner Aunt Sarah’s pity and their linking tails as they are being taken away to imply their villainy. I’m not convinced.


    5. The specific symbol I chose to analyze was the dog license. It seems to have several different (and sometimes contradictory) meanings, depending on the dog.

    For Lady, the license is a symbol of maturity and growing up. She proudly shows it to Jock and Trusty and they comment on how it symbolizes that she has become a full-grown lady.

    Jock and Trusty view the license as “the greatest honor a man can bestow”, “a badge of faith and respectability”—i.e., a symbol of acceptance and respectability. This is underlined with the posting made by the dogcatcher all unlicensed dogs (RIFF-RAFF!! STREET RAT!! Oops, wrong movie…) are to be impounded—they are unwanted by society and therefore subject to imprisonment and death at the pound. The implication is that all licensed dogs ARE wanted, and therefore valuable and respectable.

    Tramp initially views the license as a symbol of domestication, and a loss of freedom. He rejects the “leash and collar set” in favor of roaming free, but it is not clear if he really believes this or if this is a rationalization for why he’s better off not being shackled to a single family (it does seem as though he’s attached himself to several families, a day at a time, so one assumes he could be domesticated if he wanted…).

    In the dog pound, the license is viewed as a source of ridicule of the elite, but clearly there’s at least a bit of jealousy over Lady having the license. Peg says the license is Lady’s passport to freedom. In contrast to Tramp’s view of the license as a loss of freedom, in the pound the license is the only way to get true freedom.

    In the end, Tramp forgoes his freedom in lieu of his love for Lady and finds himself a home. This also plays in to the ultimate fairy tale that the love of a good woman can reform even the most scoundrelous man (cf. Princess Leia and Han Solo).


    6. This is the line I chose, from Tramp: “A human heart has only so much room for love and affection. When a baby moves in, a dog moves out.”

    Lady fears this is true when Tramp first says it because Jim Dear & Darling are behaving differently, breaking their normal patterns. Change is often feared, but not all changes are bad… However, Lady fears the worst as she is ignored several times and she seems to interpret this as being unloved or having done something wrong.

    Jim Dear & Darling effectively dispel this notion in the touching scene where they introduce Lady to the baby in the crib. It is heart-warming and shows that they do indeed view her as part of the family.

    Then Jim Dear & Darling decide to take a vacation without the baby and introduce Aunt Sarah. Unfortunately, Aunt Sarah doesn’t view her as part of the family and doesn’t know of her protective nature over the baby. Lady runs away and finds Tramp and enjoys her freedom for a while, but must go back home to protect the baby as part of the family.

    In the end, Jim Dear & Darling show up after the rat fight, figure out that Tramp was a hero not a baby-attacker, and save Tramp from the pound. Then, we end up with the ultimate family Christmas scene with Lady, Tramp, the baby, and their puppies! So, a happy ending after all, and Tramp’s original words are proved wrong….


    8. I hinted at the progression of racism in Dumbo and Peter Pan, and now we get to the cringe-worthy accents of Si & Am (yellow-face?).

    In defense of this movie, just about every stereotyped, over-the-top accent is used—the Bulldog (British cockney), Jock (Scottish brogue), Tony & Joe (Italian accents on humans), Daschie (German accent), Boris (Russian accent), and Pedro (Mexican accent). One could rightfully argue that Si & Am (Asian accent) is just one more…

    So why does the Si/Am accent feel worse? Is it really a worse stereotype than the European stereotypes in the film? Is it our guilt over real transgressions toward Asian minorities?

    In part, it seems to me that the song doesn’t help… The stereotypical music (and Asian instruments—“sitar” and “bells”). Also, the “slanty” eyes of Si & Am don’t help; I have a couple of Siamese cats at home and looking at their eyes (right now), they are very round and not slanted, so that is not an affectation of Siamese cats…

    I have to admit, I’m willing to give Disney a “pass” on this movie, and accept that the Asian accents are the same as (and as innocent as) the other European accents.

    As a nod to the future, the end shot of getting the family portrait with the puppies and the baby felt like such a rip-off from The Aristocats, only it hadn’t been made yet… Oh well.


    9. I agree with the others. The spaghetti scene seems the most iconic of this film to me, an image that just screams Lady and the Tramp. (Wait, how did Stitch get in there??)

    [​IMG] [​IMG]

    10. I picked this pin (25396) because to me, this film seems to be all about “dog equals good, cat equals bad”. Perhaps a simplified view from a cat-lover, but hey that’s what I think of when I see this movie…

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Mar 10, 2018
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  11. Meritre

    Meritre Active Member

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    I think that this song is really hard to translate - in hungarian they ssay or rather sing that siamese cats are pure blooded and they're never stupid.

    Also Lady was renamed Susie in hungarian just like in the german version. I'm not sure why they changed it, as it exists as a dog name her - one of my teachers at primary school named her dog Lady.

    That's my favourita part of your analyse! I enjoyed it very much, especially bringing in Street rat! :D


    Well, uh, those accents get mostly lost in translation... maybe it's just me but I can't hear them in the hungarian version. I'm not really good at identifying accents.
     
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  12. timeerkat

    timeerkat Your Friend Who Likes To Play

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    Sorry this is kind of short; I was delayed watching because the first copy I borrowed skipped around horribly, and we're rushing to get out of town. If I have time when I get back tomorrow I can expand a bit.

    1.
    I enjoyed this movie a lot. It's in my top three movies of this series so far. The character design is somewhat simple, but each character has his or her own unique look.

    [​IMG]

    The movie sure stuck to this! It took place primarily from a dog's point of view, down to the humans only shown from the waist down most of the time. (When we see more of a full body on a human, they are either further away or lifting the dog up closer to their face.) And all of the other animal species (cats, hyenas, apes, etc) are shown to have negative traits - the cats are shifty and mean, the apes are dumb, the hyena is obnoxious, etc. Even the beaver, who helps them out, is shown as being easily tricked.

    This film did have a broader range of cultures to be racist towards, though most of it was a milder form than Dumbo or Peter Pan. Most egregious were Si and Am, with their accent, speech pattern, facial features - slanted eyes and "buck teeth" fangs - and even their backing music and song. Tony and Joe were WAY toned down from Strombolli, but they still had a very stereotypical speech pattern ("Tony, dogs a-don't a-talk." "He's a-talkin' to me!" "Okay, he's a-talkin' to you.").

    It was interesting that except for Lady and Trusty, all mutt dogs had American accents, and all dogs of a specific breed had that country's accent. (Bull was British, Jock Scottish, Pedro Mexican, etc.).


    4. I chose Peace on Earth. It's the very first song in the film after the opening credits, and it serves to set the tone and setting of the film. Lady and the Tramp is set in a small town in the early 1900's, on Christmas Day. The softness of the music matches the sleepy atmosphere of the town, the slight echoiness pairs well with the snowy darkness, and while the song does not outright mention Christmas, the tune and lyrics are similar to many Christmas carols. And the peacefulness of the song leads into Lady's peaceful early life with Darling and Jim Dear.


    7. This movie is a lesson in differences in class and classism. Lady and her humans, Jock, Trusty, Aunt Sarah, etc. are all upper class (or at least upper middle class). They have nice comfortable homes, all their needs are met, and they have security (most notably the dogs with their licenses). Tramp, Peg, Bull, and the other pound dogs are lower class; they don't have a home, but they have freedom. That freedom is fraught, though, as they have to constantly be on guard because of the dogcatcher.

    When Lady, Jock, and Trusty first meet Tramp, Jock and Trusty go immediately on the defensive, acting aggressively and looking down on Tramp (calling him a scoundrel and a mongrel) when all they knew about him was that he was a street dog. Lady does not, but she has been living in a bubble her whole life; she is not aware of any life but the one she resides in. Meanwhile, except for Peg, the lower class dogs look down on the upper class dogs - according to Tramp, the upper class dogs have a life of confinement (versus his freedom to come and go as he pleases) but also one of insecurity - all it takes is a baby to come into the picture and you're abandoned.

    They continue to think poorly of the other side throughout the movie. Tramp tries to convince Lady to leave her home and be free, and Jock and Trusty continue to look down on Tramp. It's only when they experience good deeds from the other side do they change their mind - Jock and Trusty learn Tramp saved the baby from the rat, and Tramp sees Jock, Trusty, Lady, and her humans come to rescue him from the dogcatcher. Finally, Jock and Trusty learn that lower class dogs can be good, and Tramp learns that not all humans are bad and settles down into an upper class life.


    9. Everyone else has mentioned it, but I also have to go with the spaghetti scene. There's a reason everyone has pegged it to be their iconic scene - not only is it the most memorable one from this movie, it's probably one of the most iconic across the Disney canon as a whole. And it's even referenced outside of Disney.

    [​IMG]

    10. There are dozens of pins of just the spaghetti scene, but my two favorite pins (I couldn't pick just one) are these:
    [​IMG]
    Pin# 100747 - WDW - Imagination Gala - Most Romantic Moment - Lady and the Tramp

    Most people go for the spaghetti strand they eat together, but my favorite little part of the scene is where Tramp noses the last meatball to Lady.

    [​IMG]
    Pin# 89153 - JDS 110th Legacy Collection Lady and the Tramp Eating Spaghetti

    I love how the spaghetti strand is actually string! I thought this was a very clever take on this scene for a pin.


    Random Thoughts

    ~ The scene where puppy Lady was trying to climb the stairs was very reminiscent of Cinderella.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    ~ Man, Disney does NOT like rats! Yet another movie where the rat is a bad guy.

    ~ Did Tramp used to have an owner who abandoned him? I got that feeling when he first met Lady and told her how humans act when babies come along, but it was just alluded to, not said outright, and I can't remember if they mentioned it in Lady and the Tramp 2.
     
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  13. xdattax

    xdattax Well-Known Member

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    Keep an eye for it. I saw the other two shapes at MK over Princesses weekend, but the tote might reappear in April as some rumors seem to think.
     
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  14. pincrazy

    pincrazy Active Member

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    1) Overall Impression
    Disney discovered its magical standard and their brand in an enjoyable story with heart, romance, family, and suspense. As any good storyline with proper timing, this gave the total package as an enjoyable holiday film. I'm guessing it's Disney's first attempt at explaining the emotional changes when a baby arrives, other than the stork from Dumbo.
    3) The scene sequence that impressed me was when Jim Dear puts Lady in her basket and turns off the gas lamp for the night. The animators captured Lady's, emotions and reactions in a way the viewer easily sympathizes and connects with. Lady's expressions and cleverness makes her lovable and very quickly draws you into her world as she sees it.
    5) The symbol that seemed important was the dog tag with collar. It represented the importance of ownership and registration for a license, the responsibility of a good dog owner. However; it also was valued as a piece of jewelry.
    8) The connection seems to be a similarity in the names of the parents. In Peter Pan it was Darling, and in Lady and the Tramp the mother is Darling, the father is known as Jim Dear, which seems to be what the spouse's call each other. Names seem to be endearments to represent a loving relationship.
    10) Since the majority of pins seem to be of the spaghetti dinner scene, I'll pick #39589 the family photo, minus the baby. It's representing the happy ending.
    *After thought, watching this was remeniscent of watching Carousel of Progress in the early days. I'm curious if millenials will connect with scenes of laundry hanging on the clothes line, gas lighting, 2 piece corded telephone, newspaper delivery, much less the flasks on the tray or not knowing if it's a boy or girl before the baby arrives, and how bout delivering the baby at home. Definitely signs of the times
     
  15. xdattax

    xdattax Well-Known Member

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    Considering that millennials are all 22 and over now I’m pretty sure they understand and/or connect with those concepts.
     
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  16. MerlinEmrys

    MerlinEmrys Hicitus Pinicus!

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    Sorry guys, this one is getting phoned in. I spent all week writing a proposal for my dissertation, so I’m all analysis-ed out. Hahah!

    1. Overall Impression:
    The poster didn’t lie when it said this was Walt’s “happiest” movie! Overall, this film was fairly vanilla—nothing super crazy one way or the other. It was a cute story, excellent animation and facial expressions, and memorable characters. But without a strong central “villain,” there wasn’t much of a threat for the film. Rarely were there any “Oh no!” moments (beyond Trusty, who we immediately discovered survived), so the drama was pretty low key. Of course, just a decade and change out of WWII, and the looming Cold War on the horizon, I’m sure everyone just needed something light-hearted, which is exactly what LatT was. This screenshot nicely represents that sentiment:

    [​IMG]

    I guess this would be Disney’s equivalent to “easy listening,” hahah! But still, not saying that to undercut the film, it just wasn’t as engaging for me, I guess, because the stakes were fairly low.


    2. Character Analysis:
    I love the idea that Tramp has a different name/personality/etc for each family he stays with. His great line, “I have a family for every day of the week. The point is, none of them have me,” is such a perfect summation of his character. But I don’t judge him harshly for that. I don’t think it’s a “taking advantage of” kind of situation (well, okay, maybe a little, but not maliciously). I would say that the joy he brings the families is genuine (like Tony).

    Also, now that I’ve seen this as an adult, I can catch all of the “racier” moment, such as when Tramp is trying to talk his way out of Lady asking “this-a one?”. His facial expressions are so perfect as he just tap dances around it.

    [​IMG]

    That kind of “ahem!” he has in the first picture, and then he’s visibly relieved when Tony comes up to change the subject. XD


    4. Song Analysis:
    “He’s a Tramp” is one of my favorite Disney song, and I genuinely cannot tell you why, hahah! I just really enjoy the kind of smoky, jazz club vibe, which is very weird for me. But I think the song does a great job in trying to explain that Tramp’s charm is…inexplicable. Certainly it’s necessary for the plot that Lady fall in love with Tramp, but other than just showing her a good time, we don’t really get the buildup for a relationship the way we’ve come to expect from a Disney movie. So this song helps to patch that up a bit: “He’s a tramp, he’s a rover / And there’s nothing more to say. / Yes he’s a tramp, he’s a good one / And I wish that I could travel his way.” Peg’s song points to the fact that there’s really no reason to like Tramp (because he’s a tramp), but there’s something inexplicable about him that you just can’t help but love.

    Also, the over the shoulder shot with Peg is really really well done.

    [​IMG]


    7. Overall Goal:
    Obviously, this film is all about giving people a chance despite their appearances/past/upbringing, etc. And while we get that lesson played out in the main characters, and especially in Jock (“I misjudged him…terribly.”), we see it in the side characters as well; most notably in Aunt Sarah. At Christmas at the film’s conclusion, Jim Dear answers the door for Jock and Trusty and says, “I’ll see about refreshments,” and then calls out to Darling, “Where are those dog biscuits? The ones Aunt Sarah sent!” How cute is that!? Aunt Sarah, the avid cat-person and dog hater, sent some Christmas presents for the dogs!!! I just thought it was a very cute throwaway addition that really brought home the overall message of the film.


    9. Iconic Shot:
    I think Bella Notte or them at the park is probably the most obviously iconic, but a different frame that really struck me was when Lady was sitting on the stairs and looking up during “What is a Baby?”

    [​IMG]

    It’s a kind of melancholy moment, but the shot is so gorgeous that it sticks out to me more than just about any other moment. Moreover, it suggests that tension between Lady and the changes happening around the house that I feel are a key point of the plot.


    10. Representative Pin:

    [​IMG]
    Pin 84468 DisneyStore.com - 110th Legacy Collection - Lady and the Tramp

    I chose this pin because I really like the anticipation it builds rather than a pin of the “kiss”. The two are looking off in different directions, not realizing they’re connected, which is a nice little analogy for the film as a whole.



    Stray (pun) Thoughts:

    **THAT RAT IS MASSIVE!! Like, half the size of a dog!
    [​IMG]


    **Russ says that Scamp is auditioning for Weezer: “If you want to destroy my sweater…”
    [​IMG]
     
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  17. slbrabham

    slbrabham Well-Known Member

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    I'm coming. Don't wake up!
     
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  18. slbrabham

    slbrabham Well-Known Member

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    Lady and the Tramp Analysis
    1.) Overall Impressions
    I enjoyed watching Lady and the Tramp. The movie never felt too rushed or too slow. The scenes and characters felt important to the development of the story. The names of the leads told the viewer how each should be perceived. I particularly liked how the movie began and ended at Christmas.
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    This was at the start of the film.
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    This was at the end of the film.
    At the start of the film, the view was that of a snow covered town and the focus narrowed to one house. The viewer watched the life of Lady from pup to mother. Once her story concluded (or reached its happily ever after), the perspective reversed in the closing scenes. The view changed from inside the house on Christmas to outside the house to above the town. I thought this was a nice piece of symmetry.

    Even though the movie debuted in the early 1950s, the film remained relatable today. It did not appear outdated and the animation was beautiful. The setting was clearly turn of the century, but the story could have been set in any time period. The two key relationships in the story - Lady with her owners and Lady with Tramp were timeless.

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    Anyone with a pet was able to identify with the love between Lady and the Dears. The movie had me missing my dogs who have passed and loving on my current pet cat.

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    The relationship between Lady and Tramp was vey realistic (for being between animated canines) and relatable (for being from the 1950s about the 1900s). Both Lady and Tramp grew as characters after knowing each other. They cared about the other and went on "doggie dates." Compared to earlier relationships where characters met and fell in love on sight, Lady and Tramp had a relationship that grew through their interactions.

    The villains were relatable and understandable.

    The film maintained its realism because while the animals talked to each other the humans only heard barking from the dogs.

    2.) Character
    Tramp was the original player. He reminded me of Frank Sinatra, Gene Kelly, or other leading men in musical film from the 1950s. I don't know if his character was based on someone in particular or an original creation.

    The viewer was introduced to Tramp as her wakes up on the street. His home environment was the opposite of Lady's yet they both appeared satisfied and happy in their life. Tramp's life seemed fun and worry-free as he decided on breakfast. Unlike Lady, he chose what he wanted for breakfast instead of waiting for the owner to give her food like Lady.

    Tramp's attitude towards females mirrored his carefree lifestyle. Just as he had a different family for each day of the week, he had many former four-legged flames. He was charming but never serious with his relationships. He put on a good show and gave Lady what she needed, but he wasn't really engaged emotionally at first. At one point, I was pretty sure Tramp called Lady a trick. By calling her that name, he showed that he didn't really care for her then. She was the dog of the moment.

    While Tramp appeared carefree, he did care about others. For example, he risked the wrath of the dog catcher to release Peg from the wagon. This made me think he could be compared to a person who cared too much so he wanted to protect his heart. He was the most complex and well developed male character to date.

    His attitudes changed over time with his interactions with Lady. When he felt comfortable to love another, he did. He acted as a true hero saving the baby.

    Also, who in the 1950s said "too much starch" when considering the pastry shop like he was on Atkins.

    7.) Goal
    The movie was about not judging others from different classes. In this movie, we viewed instances of snobbery and reverse snobbery. To me the movie showed that dogs and (people) in different economic situations can be more alike to each other than different.

    I think Disney tried to show the class distinctions by having the dogs speak with accents associated with the country of their bread.

    I know that cats were a negative stereotype of Asians that existed at the time. I think this portrayal was a product of the period and an attempt at humor. Cats are thought to be enemies of dogs so they would make a good antagonist. Making them Siamese cats and having the speak in the exaggerated accent was probably a due to the cats popularity in the 1950s.

    9.) Iconic Shot
    The spaghetti scene is the most iconic scene in the movie, and one of the most iconic scenes in the film history. There were several distinct precise moments within the spaghetti scene from which to choose. I think the specific moment where they kiss is very iconic and cute due to the surprise in their eyes when their muzzles meet.
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    10.) Pin
    PP 2506 showed my most iconic moment.
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  19. coblj003

    coblj003 DPF Charter Member DPF Correspondent

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    [​IMG]

    1. Overall Impression
    This is one my wife's favorite Disney films. While considered generally a to be romance, It can be closer to a anamorphic slice of life as there is nothing particularly exciting happens outside the of the finale. Taking place in the turn of the 20th century, it tells the story of two dogs, one brought up "properly" in a middle class environment vs the other a stray living literally on the other side of the train tracks. Verna Felton returns again in this film as Aunt Sarah becoming quite a Disney Voice legend in her own right. The Animation and soundtrack is good, I rate it overall 4/5 Stars...


    2. Character Analysis

    Si and Am, while their character design might be racially insensitive I kept thinking that those behaviors seemed to be (loosely) based on their pedigree. I do remember my grandmother having several Siamese cats which she said they could only stand to be among other Siamese. They were temperamental to other cat breeds and animals as well as strangers, but to her the cats were her pride and joy.

    8. Progressive themes-
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    A continuing theme is the bridge first seen in Cinderella, it even is complete with a reflection of them in the moonlight.

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    9. Iconic Scene
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    Yes , the spaghetti kiss is probably the most memorable(as well as copied/parodied) scenes of in Disney history, period. It really cements the movie as an overall romance; To the point that my wife and I had to eat at Tony's Restaurant at MK when she first visited. The spaghetti wasn't long enough to recreate it though...

    10. Representative pin

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    Pin 81756 DLR - Cast Exclusive - 2010 Family Holiday Celebration - Lady and the Tramp

    This pin does a great job showcasing the most iconic scene above. What I like about the pin was that it was the pin celebrating the 2010 CM Christmas Season for to working at the parks; we got a few free passes and a booklet of discounts/freebies to reward us for the holiday service too.
     
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  20. unibear

    unibear DPF Charter Member DPF Charter Member

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    While this is a popular stereotype, I have had 9 Siamese cats in my life and none of them have been temperamental or unfriendly to humans. I think this stereotype comes more from the behavior of their owners than the cats. People who raise Siamese cats badly get bad cats.

    It's kind of like those superficial women who raise small dogs like Chihuahuas to be "purse dogs". These dogs probably have very different temperaments compared to small dogs raised to be part of a family and interact normally with humans...
     
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  21. MerlinEmrys

    MerlinEmrys Hicitus Pinicus!

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    Probably another hour or two before the cut off today! :D

    Great entries so far!

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  22. Meritre

    Meritre Active Member

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    Practicing for the next movie, Sleeping Beauty? :)
     
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  23. MerlinEmrys

    MerlinEmrys Hicitus Pinicus!

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    *Rings a bell*

    Last call for Lady and the Tramp!
     
  24. MerlinEmrys

    MerlinEmrys Hicitus Pinicus!

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    [​IMG]
    Sleeping Beauty (1959)

    Since I'm assuming most people will take Monday as the watch day, or at least won't have the analysis completed (and since I'm so late in posting this...) I am allowing Monday as a "wrap-up" discussion on Lady and the Tramp. So you're welcome to respond to other analyses throughout the day.

    However, you may not post any more full analyses for Lady and the Tramp to count for completion toward the 52 Challenge. No late homework. ;P

    ~Merlin
     
  25. MerlinEmrys

    MerlinEmrys Hicitus Pinicus!

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    For those of you around, feel free to come join the chat in the Chat Room! :)
     

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