The Disney 52 Animated Challenge: Year-Long Activity! NOW PLAYING: Nightmare Before Christmas

Discussion in 'DPF Game Room' started by MerlinEmrys, Dec 15, 2017.

  1. pincrazy

    pincrazy Active Member

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    Whew, clocking in with quick analysis:
    1) Overall this film is fun and highly entertaining, brining the new integration of animation with live action in film length. Very musical with Disney signature sing along songs, bright, and family oriented with small lessons about women's suffrage, banks, life decisions of priority, family fun/values, with a touch of magic in a spoon full of sugar. : p
    3) My choice for scene sequence is "feed the birds" although content is a morally/ethical position, it's a dramatic sequence with a message of benevolence, charity, and an individual can make a choice and difference, although it seems ro have a religious message. But I would add "Step inTime" as my iconic song/dance sequence, no message, just high energy and entertaining across the rooftops of London! : )
    4) The movie is filled with songs, the one I pick is "Let's Go Fly a Kite" it's the closer, uplifting compilation of words and music for the idea of just let life go. It's a seasonal pleasure to fly a kite, an art, fun to watch, and joyous, the song turns it into a statement.
    5) Hmm the symbol I'll pick is the carpetbag Mary Poppins travels with, it's magical, carries everything, and a statement accessory.....it has All you need/want materially! Wish I had one!
    10) pin #52301, rushing to correct my response, I realized #9 needed a pic posted, so I've changed to #10. It's a cute pin of Mary with the penguin as waiters.

    Overall this movie seems to break with a fully animated movie, and make live action it's main direction using animation as inserts. This seems to maybe be a sign of the times, more live action films on the horizon?
    That does it for this week on to find Jungle Book animated version!! : )
     
    Last edited: Apr 8, 2018
  2. slbrabham

    slbrabham Well-Known Member

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    Mary Poppins Analysis

    1.) Impressions
    Mary Poppins was a fun movie. I enjoyed the story of a family growing closer together as they grew to understand each other. I think Julie Andrews made Mary Poppins the character she came to be known as. There was a kindness and understanding in her portrayal of Mary that shown through even when she was stern or contrary. Dick Van Dyke's portrayed Bert perfectly. His timing and physical comedy was hilarious.

    4.). Song
    A Spoonful of Sugar was sung as the new nanny Mary Poppins tried to teach her young charges that an element of fun can be found in even ordinary chores. The song is upbeat with colorful energetic images of birds and bees in its lyrics. The bird flying to Mary as she sings adds to the magical quality. The children cleaned up there toys and learned that work does not need to be horrible. The song helped Mary teach the lesson that finding something in a chore will make it easier just as sugar makes medicine taste better. The message was relevant then and now.

    8.) Progressions
    I think Mary Poppins used lessons learned from Song of the South in its merging of animation and live action. In the Jolly Holiday scene Mary sings to the birds as Uncle Remus sings to the blue bird.

    9.) Iconic Shot
    [​IMG]
    Mary Poppins arriving on the wind was my iconic Shot as it is the first scene I think of when I think of Mary Poppins.

    10.) Pin
    PP89255
    [​IMG] I think this pin shows Mary flying with her umbrella over the London skyline and the chimney sweeps dancing which were two memorable parts of the movie.

    Stray thoughts: Nanny McPhee was similar to Mary Poppins.


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  3. coblj003

    coblj003 DPF Charter Member DPF Correspondent

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    [​IMG]
    Ack fell asleep, trying to type and update with pics later. So here we are to Disney's greatest critical achievement thus far, Mary Poppins. Not only was it a hit with audiences, it garnered many Oscar nods and wins(winning 5 including Best Actress, best visual effects, and best original song), it was also the only film of Walt's to receive a best picture nomination during his lifetime and. It was one of several Disney movies chosen to be placed in the library of congress for cultural significance.

    1. Overall Impression,
    I watched this with my kids and they just love this film, even though it clocks it in at almost 2 1/2 hours it doesn't drag on too much. As Julie Andrew's film debut, she was phenomenal. The soundtrack by the Sherman brothers is quite catchy, though certain songs were quite more memorable then others. The special effects for the live action stood out as something Walt would use in the parks and the animated cartoon parts the characters interact with seem ahead of its time, though the cartoon background sticks out as a bit too bright compared to the drab setting of the rest of the film.

    5. Symbol
    I feel the kite is a good symbol of representing the broken status of the family. In the beginning, the kids have made a home made kite which breaks in the weather because it is poorly made without guidance. Whilst the kite by the end represents that the family is brought together by having each of them play their part in helping fix it.


    8. Progressions
    [​IMG]
    This is the second Disney film of three that would utilize the same children actors, Karen Dotrice and Matthew Garber, together. The others being The Three Lives of Thomasina and the Gnome Mobile.

    9. Iconic Shot
    [​IMG]
    I agree that the scene of Mary Poppins gliding down is probably one of the most iconic images one takes from this film. I do recall the great movie ride used to have a animatronic dummy that would float slightly up and down to mimic it.

    10. Representative pin
    Pin 80658 Walt's Classic Collection - Mary Poppins - Mary Poppins Only
    [​IMG]
    There isn't too many pins that showcase specific scenes vs characters. I think this does a decent job at representing Mary floating down.
     
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  4. MerlinEmrys

    MerlinEmrys Hicitus Pinicus!

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    Whoo! I finally have time to respond to everyone's great analyses! :D

    @unibear
    You are right on the money with the comparison to MFL. I hadn't thought of it before, as I tend to think of the two separately. But there are some solid comparisons with pacing and narrative arc. And Higgins is much more likable than Banks.

    @sbmpins
    And you're right to point out the tension between Banks and his wife--that she constantly has to stroke her ego, which would be even more disagreeable for a suffragette. But I wonder how much of that was Winifred just going through the motions, nodding, and then just doing her own thing. Kind of like Taming of the Shrew.

    @timeerkat
    Ooooooooh. I love your reading of the tuppence! :D Does my English major heart good <3

    Killer choice for iconic scene. That composition was really strong and I wouldn't have thought of it.

    @pincrazy
    Good call with "Step in Time." :) If my Disney lore is correct, this scene was originally cut down a ton, but one of the choreographers slyly got Walt in to see a rehearsal. He knew Walt would love it as soon as he saw it, which he did, and Walt said that not a step could be cut. Hahah! But it's pure energy, for sure!

    @coblj003
    I like your kite symbol. :) Did you notice it was mended with paper from the London Times? So it was mended over time? ;P
     
  5. MerlinEmrys

    MerlinEmrys Hicitus Pinicus!

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    [​IMG]
    The Jungle Book (1967)

    Monday is our "wrap-up" discussion on Mary Poppins. So you're welcome to respond to other analyses throughout the day.

    However, you may not post any more full analyses for Mary Poppins to count for completion toward the 52 Challenge. No late homework. ;P

    ~Merlin
     
  6. caw caw rawr

    caw caw rawr Squirrel!

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    I know it's over for Mary Poppins but I must share one memory that I have with this one - or rather lack of memory. Growing up I spent a lot of weekends at my Grandma's house and we watched Mary Poppins to fall asleep. I always feel asleep halfway to 2/3 of the way through the movie and had no idea how it ended until years later! :)
     
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  7. pincrazy

    pincrazy Active Member

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    It's melancholy memories of our childhood, guess it's our generation and the miracle of VHS, how Fun it was to watch Disney movies at Home! Perfect incentive! Glad you finally got to enjoy the whole film :stitch:
     
  8. caw caw rawr

    caw caw rawr Squirrel!

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    Oh, I have seen it all the way through many, many times since then, but I was maybe 10 or 11 when I finally stayed up until the end. :)
     
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  9. timeerkat

    timeerkat Your Friend Who Likes To Play

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    The situation is a little different, but that reminds me of the Friends episode The One Where Old Yeller Dies, when Phoebe finally sees full movies that her mother would censor for her when she was little.

    [​IMG]
     
  10. pretty Omi

    pretty Omi Resident Smol Wolf

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    Omg I always loved that part "Hey Travis, what'cha doin with that gun..."
     
  11. unibear

    unibear DPF Charter Member DPF Charter Member

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    Time for Jungle Book. Released in 1967, the year I was born. So, from now on I will be older than the movies I review (is that good or bad?).


    1. My overall impression of the movie… Several things:
    • Yet another movie opening with a book. At least it wasn’t jewel encrusted.
    • The voice recycling in Disney movies can be fun, but it can also be distracting! I mean, it’s really hard to take Kaa seriously as a villain when he sounds like the most innocuous and innocent of all Disney characters, Winnie the Pooh (“I would like a small smackerel of Man-Cub!!”). To a smaller extent Balloo (aka, Little John from “Robin Hood”) and the female elephant (aka, the Queen of Hearts from “Alice in Wonderland”) are also retreads.
    • “Bare Necessities” is a very catchy song but doesn’t seem to move the story along all that much. Kind of reminds me of another Sherman brothers song: “Spoonful of Sugar” in Mary Poppins.
    • It’s odd that in the older movies (before the renaissance of Little Mermaid), the villain only pops up half-way through the movie or later. So, they don’t have as much of a screen presence (and I guess I remember them from my childhood as having a bigger role than they actually did in the movie). I’m thinking of the difference between Ursula and Jafar being prominent in their entire movies, compared to Si & Am or Shere Khan in their respective movies.
    • Perhaps I’m confusing Kaa/Shere Khan with Sir Hiss/Prince John, but I always remembered Kaa being Shere Khan’s sidekick/lackey. However, in the movie Kaa is a villain in his own right, and is not working for Shere Khan at all! In fact, he’s more of an adversary to Shere Khan because they are both after the man cub. Kaa is clearly afraid of Shere Khan, but he is still willing to lie to him to keep his prize of Mowgli.


    2. The character I chose to analyze was the Bagheera, because let’s face it: He’s a good kitty. Bagheera cares about Mowgli from the very start, but he seems reluctant to take care of Mowgli (or to be in CHARGE of taking care of Mowgli). So, he throws him to the wolves (actually not a bad thing in this movie!) and makes sure he is well fed and cared for. He also hints that he has been watching Mowgli as he grew for ten years (rain seasons).

    Bagheera reluctantly takes charge of getting Mowgli to the man village after the wolf council says he must go. But that doesn’t last long. Bagheera abandons Mowgli when Mowgli resists leaving the jungle (to be fair, Mowgli DID get Bagheera wet, and that’s just wrong—unforgivable!). Then, for the rest of the movie, Bagheera continually abandons Mowgli to other characters (mostly Balloo) but rushes back immediately whenever he thinks Mowgli is in trouble (after Balloo’s roar, to save him from King Louie, after he runs away from Balloo and gets lost, after his fight with Shere Khan). And he ultimately encourages Mowgli to follow the little girl to the man village.

    I get the feeling that Bagheera doesn’t want to care for Mowgli, but he just can’t help himself. I wonder if this is a matter of trying to appear strong or aloof or if there is some other factor missing from the book(s).

    On a side note, I NEED a pin of Bagheera as the stone statue.

    [​IMG]


    3. The scenes I chose to analyze was Bagheera trying to convince Balloo that Mowgli had to go to the man village. It’s clear that Balloo is less intelligent that Bagheera, and tends to focus on floating through life without a care (thought) in the world. But Balloo is also more willing to admit that he likes Mowgli. Clearly, Bagheera is thinking of what’s best for Mowgli and tries to convince Balloo that the man cub isn’t safe in the forest as long as Shere Khan is after him. Bagheera is patient but firm with Balloo, and in the end he convinces Balloo that taking Mowgli to the man village is the best thing to do.

    This scene was very effective in getting the audience to trust and love Bagheera even though he’s been kind of tough/gruff with Mowgli. It also endears the audience to Balloo and allows us to see him as more than just a slacker floating through life. He’s a slacker with a heart.


    4. The song I chose to analyze was “I wanna be like you”, King Louie’s song to a kidnapped Mowgli. (Stitch??)
    [​IMG]

    In the first verse, King Louie is singing about how he wants to be a man (aw, just like Pinocchio), stroll right into town and be like the other men. My thought was: Even if Mowgli can teach you to act human, the other humans won’t be fooled into believing you’re actually human.

    But after the second verse, I realize that it isn’t the man village King Louie is trying to fool, it’s Mowgli! He’s just buttering up Mowgli to get him to trust the king. The second verse is where King Louie finally lets us know what he’s truly after: He doesn’t want to be a man, he just wants “the power of Man’s red flower”—fire.

    When Mowgli says he doesn’t know to make fire, King Louie doesn’t believe him. At first glance, the monkey scene seems like a lot of fun and clearly Mowgli does not see any danger in singing and dancing with the monkeys. But the monkeys are more devious and dangerous than they seem. This appears to be very calculated, on the monkey’s part, because it is a better plan to get fire from man by convincing the young man cub that they are friends rather than to threaten him.

    I hate to throw race into all of this, but given white society’s (and other movie’s) penchant for using monkeys to imply a sub-human quality to blacks, it’s hard not to bristle at the fact that the black music (the very Cab Calloway feel to this song) and the black voice actors were saved to play the monkeys… I don’t think there is any overt animosity implied here, but it was still OK to use this equation (blacks = monkeys) in 1967, I guess.


    5. The symbol I chose was “man’s red flower”. As mentioned above, King Louie wants to be human to get and use fire, whether for protection or conquest is not clear. We are also told that the reason Shere Khan hates man is their use of fire. So while fire is seen as man’s ultimate weapon and used to protect man, it is actually the very thing that is threatening Mowgli’s safety because all (some) of the animals assume Mowgli has access to/control over fire even though he doesn’t. At the end, when Mowgli is fighting Shere Khan a lightning bolt conveniently hits a dead tree and it catches on fire. Mowgli uses fire to protect himself (and Balloo and the vultures) from Shere Khan.

    This plot point is just too convenient, and as such diminishes the movie in my eyes. What would Mowgli have done if he didn’t get fire? The jungle animals incorrectly assume that fire is Man’s most powerful weapon, and this convenient plot point only serves to reinforce this fallacy. I would argue that Man’s most powerful weapon is the ability to think (intellect) and use technology, fire being only one example. The ending would probably have felt more satisfying if Mowgli were able to use his brains/intellect to defeat Shere Khan using something other than fire, or at least fire that wasn’t so conveniently given to him…


    8. This movie continues to build on (and recycle) previous motifs used in other Disney movies. These include:
    • Yet another Disney movie that opens with a book…
    • As mentioned above, the whole voice actor recycling ultimately diminishes the movie because it reminds us of older characters instead of getting us to focus on the new characters.
    • As such, it’s hard to view Kaa as a legitimate villain when he sounds like Winnie the Pooh!
    • The female elephant is named Winifred (same name as Mrs. Banks in “Mary Poppins”) but she sounds just like the Queen of Hearts. So, when she threatens to take over the elephant herd from her husband, we are forced to think of the Queen of Hearts and how she is in control of the kingdom of Wonderland and the King of Hearts is basically powerless.
    • The movement of the monkeys in the movie (kidnapping Mowgli, dancing in the background of King Louie’s song, etc.) remind me of the Barrel of Monkeys in “Toy Story”, both of which are probably caricatures of the kids’ toys of that time.
    • Shere Khan’s introduction in the movie has him stalking Bambi’s mother!
    • The background in the vulture scene looks just like the background for the wizard’s duel in “Sword and the Stone”, even though the colors are slightly different (recycled backgrounds?).
    • When the vultures are singing in the barbershop quartet: “We are friends…” I wanted to finish that with “… NOT FOOD!!!” (a future nod to “Finding Nemo: The Musical”).


    9. For me, the most iconic scene is Balloo with the coconut snout dancing as an ape with King Louie. What a wonderful image, and iconic of Balloo as a slacker making his way through life, doing whatever is needed.

    [​IMG]

    10. I picked this pin (27330) because to me, this movie is all about Bagheera looking after Mowgli until he can be returned to the man village.

    [​IMG]
     
  12. PixiePost

    PixiePost Previously SoraPandora

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    Nice answers. I love Bagheera, too. And him as the stone statue would be an AWESOME pin!! Good call.


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  13. caw caw rawr

    caw caw rawr Squirrel!

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    My 2 cents: when it comes to the Jungle Book it's all about the music. It's so great. :)
     
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  14. Meritre

    Meritre Active Member

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    Maybe it was used because it is actually called book? :) (And is based on a book - but I don't think that's the reason, see 101 dalmatians)


    Once more I'm pretending to be the book expert. :) The movie has little to do with the book, the characters are very different. Baghera is a female panther and she tells that she ran away from a circus. She and Baloo convince the wolves to take Mowgl in. Baloo is a wise brown bear who teaches Mowgli everything he needs to know to live in the jungle. Kaa is his friend, not his enemy and actually it's Kaa who saves him from the monkeys. The monkey part is actually a separate story and happens much earlier than when Mowgli goes to the human village. He goes there willingly but doesn't stay there long.
     
    Last edited: Apr 14, 2018
  15. slbrabham

    slbrabham Well-Known Member

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    Walt Disney edited and changed aspects of the original story to create a more family friendly story with a clear plot. You are correct that scenes occurred in a different order from the book and characters were changed.


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  16. Meritre

    Meritre Active Member

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    Yes, the original is not at all for children, he had to mak a lot of changes to present the story to children :)

    Edit: I'm sory if my first post sounded offensive, I didn't mean it, I only thought about giving a little extra information about the source of the movie :(
     
    Last edited: Apr 15, 2018
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  17. slbrabham

    slbrabham Well-Known Member

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    The Jungle Book Analysis

    1.) Initial Impressions
    Catchy musical numbers and interesting characters created a fun coming of age film. The film appeared as a fun film with an underlying message that everyone must grow up and life can not stand still. The Sherman brothers could wright some catchy tunes that helped develop the character of the animated character singing (see I Wan'na Be Like You).

    The story moved along really well with a clear plot - save Mowgli by getting him to the man village. Shere Khan was a bigger threat in idea rather than actuality to Mowgli. Kaa almost ate Mowgli twice so I can see why he is the second villain of this film. The elephant troop provided several instances for physical comedy and "aww that's so cute" moments. For example, the viewer knew that the elephants would run into Colonel Hathi when he went to retrieve his son, but it was still funny seeing the pile up. (This reminded me of the elephant pile up from Dumbo) The idea that elephants don't forget was played for laughs, as well, when Hathi forgets to say halt and forgets the man cub. I laughed during most of Kaa's scenes because I found him so funny.

    I found the ending to be satisfying. Mowgli matured as people do and left the jungle. The first stirrings of love changed his attitude towards leaving the jungle. Bagheera and Baloo loved Mowgli and wanted the best for him. It was sad when he left the jungle but not rip your heart out sad.

    2.) Character Analysis

    Shere Khan represented the idea that you can't change a being's nature. He wanted to kill Mowgli because he was a man cub and a man cub would grow to be a man that could kill him. The other animals accepted Mowgli as an animal of the jungle "unruined" by man. Shere Khan saw Mowgli as a threat and tried to eliminate him.

    4.) Song Analysis
    The song I Wan'na Be Like You sneakily conveys King Louis's jealousy of man and desire for power. The song is upbeat and catchy with cute nonsense phrases interspaced to confuse Mowgli that King Louis wants the fun times in the jungle that Mowgli wants. Mowgli wants to be an animal living in and enjoying the jungle while King Louis wants to be like man. The other primates dance around imitating people dancing so it appears a harmless and fun goal. It appeared that King Louis was a fun, harmless admirer of mankind who wanted to help Mowgli.

    However, that is not what King Louis wanted. He was King of his group and he wanted more power. He wanted man's fire to control the other animals.
    "Give me the power of man's red flower so I can be like you." While Mowgli wanted to live a "free" life in the jungle like the animals, King Louis wanted to be like man to control other species. This song with the accompanying animation of his "castle and throne" falling to pieces showed that King Louis's ambition to be like man (have power to control others) destroyed what he created.

    5.) Symbol Analysis

    I think Fire symbolized power in this tale. King Louis wanted the knowledge of fire for its power. For him, knowing how to create fire would be power and make him more like man. This desire to learn about fire destroyed his home as sure as an actual fire.

    Shere Khan feared the fire as it was a weapon of man that man learned to use against him. He and the other animals lacked this knowledge; therefore, King Louis and Shere were at a disadvantage to man.

    Mowgli who was a man cub did not know about fire - how to create it or use it as a weapon. (The buzzards had to tell him to use it to defeat Shere Khan.) Mowgli was innocent in the ways of man and lacked any desire for power. King Louis wanted power. Shere Khan didn't want to lose his power as the apex animal in the jungle. These ideas and motivations are usually attributed to people and not animals, but it was the animals who let a drive for power destroy them.

    The fire ended Mowgli's life in the jungle.

    7.) Goal
    As I watched Mowgli's journey to the village, I thought this film was a coming of age film. Mowgli was happy in the jungle with the wolf pack, and he didn't want his life to change. He clung to his idyllic youth afraid of change. Even a threat to his life couldn't make him want to leave what he knew and loved in the jungle. He insisted with a child's naivety that he could change Shere Khan's mind about him.

    Mowgli made friends easily though not always wisely. He clung to the idea of remaining in the jungle that he trusted less scrupulous animals. Also, he was willing to stay with any animal that promised him that he could stay in the jungle. Mowgli had to face challenges and grow as a person before he could leave the jungle (his childhood). After facing Shere Khan and reaching the man village, it was the emergence of interest in a girl that made him leave the jungle and walk into the village. Leaving the jungle symbolized leaving behind his childhood.

    8.) Progressions
    There were instances of recycled animation in this film especially with Kaa. It appeared to me that the scenes where Mowgli pushed Kaa from the tree were the same (or incredibly similar). His tail had the same zags and knot on the tail.
    I know many of the voice actors had voiced other characters prior to this but that didn't jar me. I think it added to the threat of Kaa that he appeared and sounded so friendly.

    9.) Iconic Scene
    [​IMG]
    I think of Mowgli walking like an elephant when I think of this film. It also showed Mowgli's desire to mimic the animals.

    10.) Pin 126333
    [​IMG]
    This pin represented the care free life Baloo lived and Mowgli wanted. It showed the relationship of trust and love that grew between the two.

    Random Thoughts:
    A.). When I heard Baloo call Mowgli "Little Britches," I was transported in time to when I was little and watched Tail Spin. I love Tail Spin so much that I have season 1 on DVD and force my 4th graders to watch it on rainy day recess.

    B.) It still confuses me when animals of different species can talk to each other and to humans.

    C.). Is this where "catch a tiger by his tail" originated?




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  18. timeerkat

    timeerkat Your Friend Who Likes To Play

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    1. Overall this movie is ok. I find the overall story kind of dull and one-note. I actually prefer both the newer live action movie and Tale Spin over the animated original. It's an enjoyable enough movie, but not as memorable to me as many other films. It's one of the first from this series that I found myself doing other things while watching to occupy myself.

    It is of note that this is the first full-length film in this series to feature a human person of color as the main character (though 100% of the cast - at least the credited ones that I could find online - was white). I noticed that even though the movie wasn't set in London, as many of its predecessors were, a good deal of characters still had British accents. It makes sense in this context, though, since India was one of largest victims of British colonialism.

    The recycled animation is very noticeable in this film - both animation in this movie taken from others (Mowgli getting greeted by his wolf family members is a copy of Wart getting greeted by Tiger and Talbot, for example) and other movies taking from this (like Robin Hood). Many of the voice actors are also from other Disney films, though their reuse didn't bother me so much as the actors put their own spin on their voices for these characters.

    As unibear touched on, one of the most offensive aspects of this movie is King Louie and the monkeys as analogous of black people. There was still a major representation problem back in the 60's, and the monkeys seem to reflect other popular culture depictions of African Americans from that time and earlier. Their representation within the film is problematic (they are seen by the other characters as nuisances and criminals, they need fire to "be just like the other men," they are referred to by Baloo as "flat-nosed, little-eyed, flaky creeps,"etc.) And as far as I could research, the voice cast was white, which means they put on a "black-sounding" voice to play monkeys (a long-standing and highly offensive term for black people).


    2. The vultures are some of the stand-out characters to me, and an interesting contradiction. They were modeled after the Beatles - one of if not the most popular band at the time - but are vultures, one of the animals with the lowest of the low reputations. In fact, from what I can recall, all Disney vultures are painted in a negative light except for these four.

    They act as a parallel to Mowgli - they meet him in a dreary wasteland-like area when he is at his lowest, feeling like he is alone. He has been betrayed by everyone he knows - Bagheera and Baloo want to send him to the village and Kaa just tried to eat him after promising he wouldn't. In that, Mowgli feels like an outcast, which is how vultures can be seen as well.

    They also somewhat parallel the crows from Dumbo - a group of birds that is reluctant to help the hero at first but then have a change of heart and assist the main character in their task. They are actually quite heroic, being some of the few animals that actually stand up to and fight against Shere Khan.

    I also can't get over how Dizzy is, like, 90% legs.

    [​IMG]



    6. "Man-village? They'll ruin 'im! They'll make a man out of 'im." - Baloo

    The impetus for the entire story is getting Mowgli to the village so he'll be safe from Shere Khan. The animals in the jungle all know Mowgli and care about him (well, except for Kaa and Shere Khan and King Louie), so they worry for his safety. However, Baloo has the foresight to see what could happen when he does join the rest of the humans. Part of the reason they love his is because he is like them. He's grown up as part of the wolf pack and can communicate with them and cares for them greatly. Once he rejoins the humans, he'll grow up with their way of thinking. They'll change Mowgli into something that the animals don't recognize as being one of their own. Man as a concept is a threat to the animals (hunting, fire, etc.), and Mowgli turning into a man may be no different. So while Mowgli rejoining his kind is a positive thing for Mowgli's safety, Baloo recognizes that it also means that the Mowgli they know will disappear, threatening his personality at its core.


    9. The most iconic scene from the movie is The Bare Necessities. It has a catchy tune and captures Mowgli's outlook on how he wants his life to be - a carefree time living in the jungle. Within that scene, the image that stands out to me the most if Mowgli riding on Baloo floating down the river:

    [​IMG]

    I mean, who WOULDN'T want to use a big, cuddly bear as a flotation device while singing about the fun, worry-free parts of a life lived in the jungle?


    10.
    [​IMG]

    Pin# 16664 - Magical Musical Moments - Bare Necessities

    The Bare Necessities is the most iconic moment of the film for me, so I had to use a pin that depicts that scene. I think this fits that bill pretty well. ;)


    RANDOM THOUGHT

    Tale Spin wasn't the only spinoff animated series. Does anyone else remember Jungle Cubs? :D
    [​IMG]
     
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  19. unibear

    unibear DPF Charter Member DPF Charter Member

    Rating - 100%
    51   0   0

    Very good points. I forgot to mention another one: When Mowgli is left with the wolves, the wolf cubs are looking at Mowgli in a basket from afar with wagging tails. Reminds me quite a lot of the Dalmatian puppies watching TV in "101 Dalmatians"...

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
     
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  20. MerlinEmrys

    MerlinEmrys Hicitus Pinicus!

    Rating - 100%
    428   0   0

    Gotta be quick on this one I’m afraid. Got a lot going on with traveling—plus I left my notes back at the house. XD


    1. Overall Impression
    I never cared much for this film growing up. And even as an adult, before seeing it again this time, I considered it kind of simple and episodic without a really strong through-line. And as I’m studying Kipling’s actual book for my dissertation, which is extremely episodic, I suppose I just applied that thought to the film as well. However, on this viewing, I realized that I had the order of events completely out of whack in my head. There is a stronger through-line in the film and, while still episodic to a point, it works more holistically than I originally thought. It had solid pacing (not awesome, but solid) and even with the scenes I didn’t like much (the elephants, for example), they still served a good purpose in the film. What struck me so much this time, though, was how charming the film was. It was light hearted, but with enough drama to not be so cinnamon bun as others. Any major drama was rolled back by Baloo’s charm and lovability—you can’t be mad at him! I was surprised at how endearing parts of the film were, which was a major change from my earlier perceptions.

    So in a word, I’d call this film “charming”.


    2. Character Analysis
    I’m studying Bagheera for my dissertation, so naturally I’d keep an eye on him here. He’s such a good character with a heart of gold, despite his sternness and belittling of Baloo. I thought it interesting too that this film starts off with so much internal monologue / voice over to get us into the story. That voice over gets us into Bagheera’s character and makes him more dynamic—we see his struggles, his resilience to do the right thing, his caring nature. Where Baloo so quickly decided that Mowgli was “like his own cub,” I liked watching Bagheera get attached over time, often just observing, but stepping in when he felt he could make the situation better for Mowgli (we see this in the Wolf Council scene):

    [​IMG]

    And though he may get a bad rap for being the one who adamantly thinks Mowgli should go back to the man village, he’s not only ultimately right, but does so despite his own love for the boy. This makes him not only dynamic, but a really great parental figure.


    3. Scene Analysis / 6. Dialog Analysis
    I left my notes at home, so forgive the lack of specificity. But a scene that really jumped out at me was Bagheera and Baloo’s argument after saving Mowgli from the monkeys. With Mowgli sleeping soundly after his ordeal, the two step aside and Bagheera argues for taking the boy back the village. Baloo thinks he’s doing a fine job protecting the kid (recent events notwithstanding) and just sort of shrugs off the panther, saying, “Can’t a guy make one mistake.” And the camera zooms into Bagheera as he sternly responds, “Not in the jungle!” For some reason, this was very poignant, and it’s also at this point that Baloo begins to change his tune. Bagheera’s situational awareness and (over?) protective nature trumps Baloo’s “fun dad” vibe and wins the day. But I love how this scene, which is fairly long all things considered, moved so smoothly through the argument and with the sun slowly rising in the background, it suggested the impending need for everyone to come to a consensus. The scene had all the chances to be a real downer, but I saw it as such an organic resolution to the film’s two major options: let Mowgli stay, or send him where he “belongs.”

    Maybe I’ll come back when I have my notes and beef this up some.


    8. Film Progression
    I believe this was the first fully animated film that actually listed the characters along with the voice actors! I know Walt originally didn’t do that to preserve some “magic” of the animated genre, so I think it’s interesting that the first animated film after his passing does away with that.

    I’ve tried to go back and double check this point, but I don’t see them listed in the opening credits in the other films (except for Mary Poppins). So if I’m wrong, please tell me! I think this could be a really important switch for animated film making…


    9. Iconic Shot
    As with so many of these films, there were any number of choices for iconic shot. But I think the final frames of the film represent that sort of “buddy movie” relationship between Bagheera and Baloo, which I think is the more endearing connection rather than anything with Mowgli.

    [​IMG]


    10. Representative Pin
    There’s only one kinda crappy pin with Baloo and Bagheera walking away (3514), so I’ll go with this one instead:

    [​IMG]
    Pin 125808 The Jungle Book 50th Anniversary – Jumbo

    This pin does a great job of encompassing the overall energy and the different key aspects of the film: Bagheera watching over everything, the paternal relationship between Baloo and Mowgli, and the Vultures who represent that friendship theme that runs throughout the film.


    Stray Notes:

    --Shere Kahn didn’t show up in the film until SO late!! Just the threat of his name was enough to make him menacing for almost 3/4 of the film.

    --Also, SK’s facial expressions were so strange…he was so coy that I can’t decide if that undercut him as a threat, or made him all the more terrifying when he actually was scary.

    [​IMG]

    Could he be part of that effeminate villain trope we’ve talked about a bit @NutMeg ? (maybe I should have done my character analysis on SK!)


    --I caught just a few comments before posting my own analysis, but someone mentioned a Bagheera as a Statue pin. That does exist in the Jungle Book Anniversary box set that was released recently:

    [​IMG]
    Pin 126351 The Jungle Book 50th Anniversary - Four Pin Box Set - King Louie and Mowgli Only

    King Louie and Mowgli slide to the left and you see Bagheera in the background.


    --Speaking of Louie, isn’t he sort of a villain? He does kidnap Mowgli. Or is he just too silly to count? XD
     
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  21. PixiePost

    PixiePost Previously SoraPandora

    Rating - 100%
    145   0   0

    OMG Jungle Cubs looks adorable.

    By live action movie, do you mean the one that just came out, or the one from the 90s? I remember LOVING the one from the 90s, although I haven’t seen it in years. I think the plot was kind of half JB, half Tarzan though...

    [​IMG]


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
     
  22. timeerkat

    timeerkat Your Friend Who Likes To Play

    Rating - 100%
    237   0   0

    The new one directed by Jon Favreau. :)
     
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  23. coblj003

    coblj003 DPF Charter Member DPF Correspondent

    Rating - 100%
    26   0   0

    Ack, late late, just woke up from nap. Hopefully get a little time to type...
     
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  24. MerlinEmrys

    MerlinEmrys Hicitus Pinicus!

    Rating - 100%
    428   0   0

    It will be a while before I can make the cut off post, so you should be good. :)

    Sent from my SM-G950U1 using Tapatalk
     
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  25. pincrazy

    pincrazy Active Member

    Rating - 100%
    7   0   0

    Whew, not cut off yet, ok checking in...
    1) Overall impression, seemed longer than it was, I didn't remember most of the film, and it felt different than what i recalled or thought . Again a classic in colors and art animation, scenes seemed familiar to future movies like Tarzan and Lion King.
    3) The scene I pick is when Mowgli was brought to the wolf's den and cubs. At first with the curiosity and excitement it seemed that it unusual he would have been accepted into the family, as an adopted membet, but then the scene reminded me of when Tarzan was found as a baby, sort of similar acceptance by animals to adopt human babies.
    4) Enjoyed Bare Necessities, fun, lively, carefree essence of life. Toe tapping and animated as life lessons.
    7) Overall goal or lesson is the struggle in life is unexpected. Friendships are important not only for companionship, but protection, acceptance, survival, and to find your way.
    10) Luckily a series of pins just got released for it's 50th, I think #125808 shows the relationship Mowgli has for Baloo, with Bagheera watching probably with frustration.
    Rushing to clock this in.....
     

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