The Disney 52 Animated Challenge: Year-Long Activity! NOW PLAYING: Nightmare Before Christmas

Discussion in 'DPF Game Room' started by MerlinEmrys, Dec 15, 2017.

  1. coblj003

    coblj003 DPF Charter Member DPF Correspondent

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    Since I'm rushing to type, I'll update with pics after the fact. This is notable as last film that Walt Disney and Verna Felton worked on before their deaths.
    1. Overall Impression,
    After the 2 1/2 hour length of Mary Poppins, I feel this is a little more time manageable and contained. The music feels more exotic,and much of the much of the setting is seemingly reminiscent of disneyland's adventureland (jungle cruise anyone?). While certain aspects of it are effectively reused with the xerox process, it still feels fresh. Many of the voice actors are recognizable Disney legends; one who might sound familiar, Bruce Reitheimer whose brothers also filled in for the voice of Arthur in Sword in the Stone, alone voices Mowgli and later Christopher Robin.

    Ironically this week I was listening to a npr snippet about intrinsic bias, and how it portrays on race in America and the rest of the world. I feel that the many of the preducial aspects of this film also take on how they present each of the animals throughout the film itself takes place in India. For instance much of the upper hierarchy of animals such as Bagheera and Shere Khan seem to have a British accent while those with a much lower standing Such as Mowgli and Baloo have a standard American or even a Stereotypical African American like accent such as the monkeys and King Louie.
    4. Song Analysis
    The vultures song is probably unique about they want to be close friend with Mowgli. It's sorta an inversion of how they are normally portrayed as heartless scavengers, instead trying to give another sense as close friends till the very end...

    7. Film Meaning
    Much like like the colonial aspect of the book, the movie intrinsically implies that it might be is best to stay with your own kind or race. Even though this takes place during the civil rights era, it is sadly implied it as Mowgli is given an American accent is given to the boy and that much of the other protagonists are a dark or black color. This isn't anything new from that time period, Rodgers and Hammersteins South Pacific also deals with this issue when it is implied that the two romantic love interest are best to stay apart because they are from different backgrounds/races.

    8. Progressions
    While much of the films after this would continue to use this as a base, the xerox process does wonders what they can reuse from previous films. For instance, Wart/Mowgli being hounded by the dogs.

    9. Iconic Scene
    Much of the background scenery is lush and gorgeous like the waterfall and the moonlite water scene so I like the background of Mowgli walking next to the waterfall.
     
  2. Ajk

    Ajk New to DPF but not to trading

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    Man, Mowgli sure did grow up.
     
  3. pretty Omi

    pretty Omi Resident Smol Wolf

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    Side note, Bear Necessities is actually NOT by the Sherman Bros! It is the only song not written by them in the film, as it was from a previous draft of the film and the only song from that draft that was kept!
     
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  4. pretty Omi

    pretty Omi Resident Smol Wolf

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    I absolutely ADORED Jungle Cubs!!! I remember when it was brought back on Disney Channel for a while at like 5am, and I would set an alarm just to wake up and watch it, and go back to bed HAHA

    I also loved this version of the film, and actually managed to track down a dvd copy! Fun fact: Kitty is Cersei Lannister :p

    I also really enjoy the new Jon Favreau "live action film", it's actually the only live action remake so far that I like, all the others are bleh ^^;;
     
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  5. PixiePost

    PixiePost Previously SoraPandora

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    I’m so jealous of you having the DVD! I have the VHS (one of the few I kept from childhood) but no longer have a VHS player. I felt like watching it a few years ago so I tried to track down a DVD and for some reason they’re $$$$ on eBay.

    I DID NOT realize Kitty was played by the same woman who plays Cersei in GoT OMG!!!!! Now I need to watch it even more!

    I DO remember that the bad guy is played by my true love Wesley, the Dread Pirate Roberts aka Cary Elwes!


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  6. PixiePost

    PixiePost Previously SoraPandora

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    LOL! He’s actually a little boy in the very beginning of the film... but yeah. They aged him up quite a bit so they could turn it into a romance.


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  7. NutMeg

    NutMeg I tie my own sandals.

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    Oh yeah you're totally right! I didn't even think of him when we first started talking about the trope (probably because I haven't seen Jungle Book in forever), but I just watched one of his scenes on YouTube and I def think he qualifies. He's kind of a proto-Scar in some ways, don't you think? Their paw gestures and voices are super similar (the "foppish" English accent, although I suppose that's pretty standard for all of Disney's effeminate villains.) I keep forgetting to send you this excellent (and really funny) video about the trope + Disney's gay coding, and their overall relationship with the LGBTQ community both on-screen and off. (I watch a lot of film analysis on Youtube and this particular vid is a crossover by two of my faves. Idk if you've ever heard of the Needs More Gay series, but the guy who does it is hilarious and super insightful!) Maybe I'll just post the link to the video on here, but idk if anyone else is even interested in this discussion, or if it's just us queer Disney-loving film buffs who love talking about nerdy cinematic stuff, and everyone else just tunes us out. xD

    PS, your travel plans include a future DLR visit, right?? :p
     
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  8. MerlinEmrys

    MerlinEmrys Hicitus Pinicus!

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    Whoo! Time for some responses! :D

    @unibear
    It's definitely easy to confuse Kaa/Khan with Hiss/PJ as most marketing and pins put the two together. But you're absolutely right, they're more in competition with each other than anything else.

    As for re-using voice actors, I find this to be one of my favorite aspects of animation. And while I can get your point as far as it being a distraction (Baloo/Little John for example), I think for the most part they're different enough that I can see the connection but enjoy their new role. As for Kaa, I love that it's close to Pooh, but just different enough to be a unique spin--I think it shows Holloway's talent. Baloo/Little John might be a unique case because, not only are they the same actor, they're basically the exact same character, using the same animation, performing the same role. Harris's voicing as Thomas O'Malley (even though it's just the "Baloo" voice) doesn't feel as distracting.

    I love your reading of "Wanna Be Like You"! You're right on the money!

    But I did want to add one thing about the racism bit. There's clearly racial coding here, but not quite the way you're thinking with the voice acting--it's worse. Bill Skiles and Pete Henderson (white) voiced the Monkeys. As Cory Lund explains, "The lines, voiced by all white actors, strike the same tone as minstrel show actors performing in blackface for white audiences in the Jim Crow era. The white actors voicing these monkeys went out of their way to voice these characters as black. And not just black people, black fools. They laugh wildly at everything and can barely hold themselves back with swings of hysterics at whatever they do. They were intentionally portrayed and voiced to paint black people as foolish, dirty criminals." Lund may be a little heated in his writing style (and I don't buy the end of his argument), but he's pointing out that this isn't just a "save the black actors for these parts" sort of thing. It's that they were deliberately directed to perform these roles in this particular way. So that equation you provided is true, but it's all the more disconcerting that it seems the company was aware of that equation and leaned into it. (Note: If I'm wrong about this, please let me know. But everywhere I could find reinforced this information.) (Note 2: I see also that after I've typed up all of this, Tessa touched on it too. Oh well XD)

    In other news, why you hating on the book opening?? XD I don't read it as recycling, but as establishing a style of storytelling (actually telling a story "from a book").


    @Meritre
    You're quite right about the film being different from the book, but Bagheera is definitely still male in the book. That's actually an important point for my dissertation, so I'd be really interested to know if he got a gender change in a translation! That would be fascinating....


    @slbrabham
    I like your character analysis here. So if SK says you can't change (or be inherently one thing), and the others accept Mowlgi on his own terms, what do you do with the ending that Mowgli did actually go back to man?

    @timeerkat
    You've got some killer points about the Vultures. I tend to "check out" at that part of the movie, so I didn't give them much thought. But you're right that they defy expectations and end up being quite lovable despite being less desirable animals.

    @pincrazy
    Somehow, I never even thought about the connection with Tarzan... One of those so obvious things that I just missed it. XD Isn't Tarzan in a basket too? Or was it a cradle...

    @coblj003
    I'm glad you pointed out the accents! Because we see some really interesting undercurrents with accents as the films progress. Here's a neat article about foreing accents in film that I find quite fascinating... @NutMeg you might like that article too!
     
  9. MerlinEmrys

    MerlinEmrys Hicitus Pinicus!

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    [​IMG]___[​IMG]
    The Aristocats (1970) and BONUS: Bedknobs and Broomsticks (1971)

    Monday is our "wrap-up" discussion on Jungle Book. So you're welcome to respond to other analyses throughout the day.

    However, you may not post any more full analyses for Jungle Book to count for completion toward the 52 Challenge. No late homework. ;P

    Also, this is our first week with an actual Bonus film. Generally, the conversation will lean on the primary film (Aristocats), so if you can only watch one, go for that one. But you can watch both and do a separate analysis for each and earn two "points" toward your 52 Challenge! :)

    ~Merlin
     
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  10. pretty Omi

    pretty Omi Resident Smol Wolf

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  11. Meritre

    Meritre Active Member

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    @MerlinEmrys I guess I was tricked by my memory, I remembered reading somewhere in the book the words 'female panther' But when I got out the digital copy an searched for the words I didn't find anything. I always believed that Bagheera is a female panther I guess it was based on the few sentences about the punishment he gave Mowgli after the monkey adventure, that his own cubs wouldn't even wake up. Knowing that panther mothers raise their cubs alone, my sister and I assumed Baghereera was female. Neither of us have read the original yet, only the translation and my language doesn't show as clearly as English if for example an animal is male or female. Going by only the hungarian translation, Bagheera could be male or female as he is called either Bagheera or panther.

    Oh and before I forget: there is a hungarian musical called Jungle book that is based on Kiplings book and there Bagheera is a female role - maybe that one influenced me as well.
     
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  12. MerlinEmrys

    MerlinEmrys Hicitus Pinicus!

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    That is super fascinating! Part of my argument is that children's literature toward the end of Victoria's reign features non-normative mother figures. So you're right in saying that Bagheera displays maternal characteristics toward Mowgli, but the fact that he is both male and non-human feeds back into my point. But to hear that he becomes female in other versions is really really cool! :D Thanks for sharing!!!

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  13. slbrabham

    slbrabham Well-Known Member

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    @MerlinEmrys

    To me Shere Khan represented the nature argument in in developmental behavior psychology while Baloo represented the nurture argument. SK hated and tried to kill Mowgli because of nature. SK's nature was to hunt and eliminate possible threats. (Tigers are solitary, territorial predators.). SK must have been very dangerous and adept at killing because the other animals feared him and thought they would not be able to protect Mowgli. SK believed that Mowgli's "man" nature would drive Mowgli to kill him. It was never the actions of Mowgli that caused SK to try to kill. SK actually appeared to admire Mowgli's spirit when he met him. On the other hand of the debate was Baloo who represented the nurture side. Baloo did not want to return Mowgli to the man village because he thought they would "ruin him." With this statement, the viewer saw that Baloo felt that Mowgli benefited from his time in the jungle. Because he had grown up in the jungle with the animals, Baloo felt that Mowgli did not have the negative traits associated with man. Baloo planned to teach Mowgli how to act like him to survive in the jungle by modeling bear like behaviors which strengthened the argument that Baloo felt Mowgli could be a bear in actions.

    To answer your question, Mowgli's eventual acceptance of going to the man's village can be an argument for nature determining actions or behavior. Mowgli saw a another human, probably for the first time, and felt a connection to her. He let his instincts (just as the mother wolf let her motherly instincts lead her to caring for the infant) lead him to the village.

    There are some actions or behaviors that are instinctual and part of one's nature. No amount of reconditioning or behavior modification can change some actions.

    However, the parts of the movie (through Mowgli's acceptance of animal like behaviors as normal and the animal's acceptance of him) supported the nurture argument as a equally important to development. For example, Bagheera felt a duty to return Mowgli to the "man" village which appeared to be part of his responsible nature in the film. However, as Bagheera's contact with Mowgli increased his affection for Mowgli appeared to grow, as well. He wanted to protect Mowgli. Bagheera could have left Mowgli in Baloo's care and ignored any cries for help, but Bagheera didn't.
    Bagheera was a balance between nature and nurture. He came to care for Mowgli through their interactions, yet he knew Mowgli needed more than the animals could provide.
     
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  14. unibear

    unibear DPF Charter Member DPF Charter Member

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    I think this is why the vultures also remind me of Bruce and the other sharks in "Finding Nemo"—they are both playing against the "killer" stereotypes of these species and making them friends and not adversaries (or food)!
     
  15. pretty Omi

    pretty Omi Resident Smol Wolf

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    I was musing on this the past couple days after reading all these analysis, and I never thought Louie wanted the fire to have power over the animals? I thought it literally meant he thinks he can become a human, and be accepted by men.

    Now I'm the king of the swingers, oh
    The jungle VIP
    I've reached the top and had to stop
    And that's what botherin' me
    I wanna be a man, mancub
    And stroll right into town
    And be just like the other men
    I'm tired of monkin' around!

    He's done everything he can to try to be human. He wants to walk like them (I took this to mean upright, which apes sort of can), he wants to talk like them. He's the only animal living in the ruins of an older human settlement, to appear to live as a human does. He's done everything he can think of to be a human, and yet he obviously isn't one. So he figures if he gets fire, the tool that ultimately sets man apart from the animals in the story, that it will complete his transformation into a man, and he will be accepted by the other men.

    I went to search and see what the original book says about him, only to find he's a totally made up character by Disney!
     
  16. MerlinEmrys

    MerlinEmrys Hicitus Pinicus!

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    No he's definitely in the book, but obviously not as the Disney Louie. Look for the chapter "Kara's Hunting" and passages about the Bandar-Log.

    But I'm definitely on board with your reading here! :)


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  17. pretty Omi

    pretty Omi Resident Smol Wolf

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    Yeah I definitely found info about the Bandar-Log, just not that they necessarily had any sort of leader, let alone a "king"!
     
  18. MerlinEmrys

    MerlinEmrys Hicitus Pinicus!

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    Ah got ya. :) yeah, they're not structured like the rest of the Jungle, who obey "The Law of the Jungle." kind of Kipling's argument that the closer you get to man, the less civilized you become...

    And sorry! Didn't mean to sound like I was saying you missed something. XD

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  19. pretty Omi

    pretty Omi Resident Smol Wolf

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    Nah you're good!
    I read it as a young kid, but I definitely don't remember it haha, I guess I should put it on my ever growing things to read list
     
  20. MerlinEmrys

    MerlinEmrys Hicitus Pinicus!

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    (Just read the Mowgli stories... And Rikki Tikki. The rest of it isn't thaaaaaaat good...)

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  21. pretty Omi

    pretty Omi Resident Smol Wolf

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    Omg I love the Rikki Tikki cartoon...
    [​IMG]
    Who has delivered us, who? Tell me his nest and his name! Rikki, the valiant, the true, Tikki, with eyeballs of flame~
    Rikk-tikki-tikki, the ivory-fanged, the hunter with eyeballs of flame!
     
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  22. MerlinEmrys

    MerlinEmrys Hicitus Pinicus!

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    Yaaaaaas! And it's like word for word from the book.

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  23. watzshakinbacon

    watzshakinbacon B for Belle or B for bacon?

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    Awww I haven’t seen bedknobs and broomsticks in forever! I’ll prob just watch it later and catch up. I didn’t even know it was a Disney movie until I started collecting pins!


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  24. unibear

    unibear DPF Charter Member DPF Charter Member

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    We finally hit my favorite movie as a kid, the Aristocats! (Everybody wants to be a cat!)

    1. and 8. My overall impression of the movie… Several things:

    It’s a very endearing movie with a minor (inept) villain and just lots of fun. I don’t really feel like Edgar is fleshed out as a character. He seems kind and jovial at the beginning but once he thinks he’s going to get $$, he becomes a selfish jerk. I’m not sure why he couldn’t just take care of the cats and live his “high life” as a millionaire. Perhaps this hits too close to home for me right now. Earlier this month, my aunt passed away and she left her house to a cousin who was caring for her. Even before my aunt had passed, this cousin asked my sister to take my aunt’s cat away so that she could move her yippy dog into *her* new house. That still stings…

    I’m not one to laugh out loud at a movie, even ones I really love, but there were two scenes in the movie that made me laugh out loud! The first was Napoleon and Lafayette chasing Edgar in his motorcycle upside down in circles under the bridge; the second was all of the alley cats running to save the kittens and Roquefort chasing after them (a mouse chasing cats!).

    The recycling of voices didn’t bother me in this movie. I know O’Malley = Baloo and Roquefort = Winnie the Pooh, but in this case they felt different enough that I wasn’t distracted away from the story (unlike “The Jungle Book” last week)

    Finally, this movie really feels a lot like “Lady and the Tramp, but with cats”. My issues:
    • Duchess = Lady. A lady of grace and breeding that is removed from her life of leisure and comfort only to meet a commoner scoundrel who falls in love with her on her trek to return to her high-class life. I feel like I like Duchess more because she isn’t as “stuck-up”, perhaps because she doesn’t have that luxury since she has three kittens to take care of. Duchess seems to see the best in people and situations. Duchess doesn’t believe Edgar would hurt them, and she seems to accept new situations (getting into the back of a truck, the geese, O’Malley’s flat in Paris and his alley cat friends, the alley cats’ music, etc.) gracefully. Lady seems much more insecure and at times a bit judgy.
    • O’Malley = Tramp. I’ll take O’Malley. More later…
    • Edgar = Aunt Sarah? Both are the catalyst for removing the female protagonist from her comfortable and happy life. The difference is Aunt Sarah never intended to do that (Lady ran away while Aunt Sarah was trying to buy her a muzzle), but Edgar did intend to do this.
    • Abigail & Amelia = Si & Am?? OK, this is a big stretch but they’re both twins and they have memorable themes that seem similar. That’s about it.
    • Duchess and Lady both fall in love with the scoundrel, but both feel a responsibility/love for their humans and have to go home. But I think Duchess recognizes that this could mean a separation from O’Malley whereas Lady just goes with the flow and doesn’t think about how Tramp would be received at home…
    • Piano party scene = Dog pound scene. From the perspective of: lots of alley cats/stray dogs of different breeds with accents intended to match the nationality of their breed. However, the piano scene is just a whole lot more fun than the dog pound scene, the scoundrel hasn’t abandoned the lady, and at the end of the movie the alley cats have a happy ending with Madame as opposed to the strays dogs in the pound that remain behind when Lady is returned to her home.
    • I mentioned this in the “Lady and the Tramp” analysis, but the end shot in each movie of getting the family portrait with the lady, the scoundrel, and the kittens/puppies are incredibly similar.


    2. I chose to analyze Abraham DeLacy Guiseppe Casey Thomas O’Malley. As I mentioned above, he seems an awful lot like Tramp. Even the song introducing “O’Malley the Alley Cat” is reminiscent of “He’s a Tramp”. O’Malley is an alley cat who enjoys his freedom and does not really seem to covet the life of a domesticated cat.

    As with Tramp, he expresses a distrust of human owners: “Humans don’t really worry too much about their pets.” However, he isn’t over-the-top in his dislike or distrust of humans (Tramp: “A human heart has only so much room for love and affection. When a baby moves in, a dog moves out.”).

    Although both scoundrels agree to help their ladies get back home, O’Malley is much quicker to warm up to idea of being a family man/domesticated. Perhaps it’s the kittens that warm O’Malley’s heart, but he just doesn’t feel as wounded and distrustful of human owners.

    O’Malley also stays with Duchess throughout the film and doesn’t abandon her as Tramp does (to be fair, O’Malley did originally intend to get Duchess and the kittens on the car and leave them, but he quickly joined them and became a part of the family, and Tramp didn’t *want* to leave Lady but she got caught by the dog catcher and he didn’t, although he could have got himself caught to stay with her).

    In the end, both O’Malley and Tramp become family men and both appear to be fine with that decision.


    3. and 4. The scene I chose was the piano scene. “Everybody Wants to be a Cat!” Mostly I chose this scene because it’s such a fun and delightful scene. I think the scene is intended to be lots of fun and show that you don’t have to be a fat (rich) cat to have fun. It also allows Duchess to show that, while she is well bred, she isn’t stuffy or judgmental of these alley cats. This makes her feel much more mature/sophisticated than Lady (who does seem to hold on to classist ideas; not that she’s judgmental, more that she’s naïve and has lived a sheltered life).

    I love this scene because it also shows that cats of all walks of life and breeds can get along and have a great time—no alley cat looking down on the “lady” or her kittens, and no high-bred cats/kittens looking down on the alley cats. This feel is so much nicer that the classist attitudes (in both directions) shown in “Lady and the Tramp”.


    9. For me, the iconic scene is the final family portrait.

    [​IMG]

    10. I picked this pin (16858) because to me, this film seems to be all about Duchess and O’Malley’s burgeoning love, and how he fits so purr-fectly into the new family, as evidenced by the admiring looks of the three kittens as they (and we) realize that Duchess and O’Malley are falling in love with each other.

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Apr 20, 2018
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  25. unibear

    unibear DPF Charter Member DPF Charter Member

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    This was the first Disney movie that I saw in the theaters as a kid. Haven’t really watched it very often (if at all) since.

    1. My overall impression of the movie… Several things:
    • The movie reminds me of “Mary Poppins” for several reasons, described in more detail below. However, I found this movie to be more enjoyable than “Mary Poppins”, even though both of them were over 2 hours long, and both dragged quite a bit at times.
    • Miss Price’s first name is Eglantine. Didn’t her parents love her??
    • The bed flying special effects reminded me a bit of the boat ride scene in “Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory”.
    • Suspension of belief notwithstanding, how could the characters on the bed breathe underwater, let along dance, without suffocating??
    • I found the ending of the movie to be particularly unsatisfying. Mr. Browne is leaving Miss Price and the children to join the British army (noble, yes, and I guess that’s the point; but he’s still leaving them). And Miss Price has said that she’s giving up magic. At least she kept the children…


    2. The character I chose to analyze was the priest, Mr. Jelk, portrayed by Roddy McDowall. This is probably the first time Disney has ever made a man of the clergy into a possible villain! From his introduction, it is clear that he has designs on Miss Price, or more specifically her $$. He says that, “One needs an anchor of domesticity, a feeling that one has a cozy place to return to, as one fairs forth to do Heaven’s work.” It’s very odd for a clergyman to be so interested in material wealth, and my initial thoughts were that he was avaricious and cold.

    Later on, he delivers a letter to Miss Price in the guise of chatting her up and to get his hooks into her and her $$. However, she appears rather uninterested (and perhaps a bit absent-minded) as she is working with the children to get the travel spell on the bed working. Still, Mr. Jelk seems more interested in the sturdiness of her house and porch than in Miss Price herself.

    We finally see him when he again visits Miss Price’s house and encounters the animated objects from the substitutionary locomotion spell. I’m guessing this is scene is intended to provide comic relief as a man of Christ comes face-to-face with witchcraft, even though nothing really comes from this “confrontation”.

    By and large, every time I saw this character I kept thinking that he has the potential to be a Disney villain, but it never seems to come to fruition. I guess he’s an unfulfilled villain that just ends up looking like a selfish and self-serving character. I honestly don’t think the movie would be adversely affected if he were left out, and I can’t really see what he contributes to the movie other than a bit of comic relief, if that.


    3. The scene I chose to analyze was the soccer scene on the Island of Naboombu. I found the animated island scenes to be my most favorite scenes of the entire movie, and I really enjoyed this sequence.

    The animated soccer scene was a lot of fun, and played on a lot of sight and running gags. These included scenes with: (1) An elephant afraid of a mouse, (2) An ostrich that puts its head in the sand, (3) Vultures continually looking for victims, complete with gurney, just to be disappointed, (4) A dangling gorilla batting away the ball with his feet and an elephant using his trunk to pass the ball, (5) There was also the continual running gag (pun intended) of the referee being run over by the herd of soccer players.

    Although, strictly speaking, this sequence did not move the story forward much (other than the continual efforts of Mr. Browne to get the star from the king), it did not feel like it dragged out an already overly long movie (see below).


    4. The song I chose to analyze was “Portobello Road”, which was a rather long and tedious sequence in a movie that is 2 hours and 20 minutes long. This start of this song sounds very reminiscent of “Feed the Birds” from “Mary Poppins”. I’m sure the goal of this song was to entertain the moviegoers and introduce lots of different music styles/dancers (including Indian, Scottish, and Jamaican examples). However, while many might find this scene to be fun, I did not. I found it to be a waste of movie time and pointless to the movie. I can’t say that it progressed the movie forward at all (Miss Price was looking for the book, but we didn’t need a 20-minute dance sequence to show that) and I found myself saying: “Isn’t this over yet?”

    This whole sequence does harken back to “Mary Poppins” when I said (and felt) the exact same way with the chimney sweep dance number. This pointless dance number also reminds me of other musicals, like “Singing in the Rain”, which includes SEVERAL pointless and boring numbers that ultimately slow the movie down and make it longer than it needs to be (or should be).


    5. The symbol I chose to analyze was the fluffy white rabbit. Several people are turned into a fluffy white rabbit, and for different reasons. First was Charles, as a punishment for trying to blackmail Miss Price, and it did make him scared of the cat (a minor plot point used to get a reluctant Charles involved in the travel spell). Miss Price also turns Mr. Browne into a white rabbit when she first met him and again when he refused to tell her where the book with the spell she’s looking for is. In these cases, it was to get Mr. Browne’s attention and get him to focus on the spell instead of his dreams of fame and fortune/selfishness. After being turned into a white rabbit the second time by Miss Price, he complains: “I don’t mind being changed into a hawk or a tiger, or something with a bit of dash. But always a fluffy white rabbit—it’s intolerable.” Miss Price turns King Leonidas into a fluffy bunny (with a lion’s tail) to protect them all and neutralize the threat of a dangerous lion by turning him into a helpless little bunny! Finally, Mr. Browne turns himself into a white rabbit to escape from the Nazis. In this case, Mr. Browne uses the harmless reputation of the fluffy white rabbit to his advantage to escape the Nazis and save Miss Price and the children.


    8. This movie continues to build on (and recycle) previous motifs used in other Disney movies. These include:
    • Character recycling was at a minimum: Professor Emelius Browne = Mr. George Banks from “Mary Poppins”. As with his character in “Mary Poppins”, I am not overly fond of Mr. Browne and find him to be selfish and annoying; however, his redemption in this movie was a bit more successful than Mr. Banks’s redemption.
    • The animators seemed to have fixed the lighting/brightness issues of mixing live action and animations that plagued “Mary Poppins” and made the former film feel less than convincing.
    • King Leonidas’s growl reminds me of Beast’s growl from “Beauty and the Beast”.
    • The vultures with the gurney remind me of the vultures in “The Jungle Book”. Perhaps these vultures are a bit more in character (looking for victims of the soccer game) than those in “The Jungle Book”, which seem completely harmless and friendly.
    • When the hyena laughs hysterically, he sounds just like Goofy!
    • The “Substitutionary Locomotion” song reminds me of “Supercalifragilisticexpialidocious”, including nonsense words and a catchy tune.


    9. For me, the most iconic symbol from the movie is the flying bed.

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    10. There aren’t a whole lot of “Bedknobs and Broomsticks” pins out there, so I picked this pin (51544). It is from one of the more enjoyable scenes of the movie (soccer in Naboombu), complete with King Leonidas wearing the referee’s whistle instead of the star of Astoroth.

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    Last edited: Apr 21, 2018

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