The Disney 52 Animated Challenge: Year-Long Activity! NOW PLAYING: Nightmare Before Christmas

Discussion in 'DPF Game Room' started by MerlinEmrys, Dec 15, 2017.

  1. unibear

    unibear DPF Charter Member DPF Charter Member

    Rating - 100%
    51   0   0

    While I didn’t care much for “The Rescuers”, I found this one to be a wonderful surprise and ended up liking it (given that I had such low expectations from the first movie).


    1. My overall impression of the movie… Several things:

    • The opening of the film felt more like “A Bug’s Life” than a movie in the outback.
    • Is Cody a member of the Rescue Aid Society in Australia? Do they have human members? It would have been cool for them to admit that he was a member of the RAS!
    • The movie definitely has a pro-environmental bent to it—perhaps a nod to the animated “Ferngully” that came out two years later. The hero (Cody) is very much concerned with saving endangered animals, and the villain (McLeach) is very much concerned with making money by exploiting these animals. McLeach also drives a “gas-guzzler” Land Rover that spews out a lot of pollution. He also seems to be rather short-sighted, mainly concerned with making a buck NOW and not about the future.
    • It does look like Bianca represents Hungary (a nod to Zsa Zsa Gabor) and Bernard represents the USA in the RAS. I guess he’s a full member, and not just a janitor anymore?
    • Is Bernard over his fear of 13? He seems to have grown a bit more confident and daring, but the writers are quick to make him meek and hapless and milquetoast when needed.
    • I hate to harp on the voice recycling thing, but did you notice that the mouse doctor working on Wilbur was Doctor Bombay from “Bewitched” (Bernard Fox)?. He has a very distinctive voice!


    2. The character I chose to analyze was Bianca, based on how she changes (or didn’t) from the first movie. In both movies she is an adventurous, confident, caring, and brave member of the Rescue Aid Society intent on helping those in need. She also sees the good in others, including Wilbur, Jake, Cody, and especially Bernard.

    In my review of “The Rescuers” I noted that there was definitely a sexist protectionist bent to the RAS that would not allow Bianca to head up a mission without a male mouse along. Now it seems that that attitude has lifted, and they view her (and Bernard) as valuable members of the RAS.

    Honestly, I don’t really see much growth in Bianca from the first movie to this one, just more of the same. She is still the object of just about every male mouse’s libido, and she still seems oblivious to it. And I still wonder if she really doesn’t notice the attention, if she’s just used to it, or if she is using their interests to help her get what she wants (in this case, to save Cody).

    At the start of the film, it still feels like Bernard is confusing a good working relationship with a female coworker as love. And it still seems like Bianca just sees a good working relationship and not a love connection. The end of the movie, however, when Bianca accepts Bernard’s marriage proposal casts doubt on her true feelings/intent. Perhaps she does love him, and I was misinterpreting her actions. It would have been refreshing for her to say, “No. Bernard we work well together, but that doesn’t mean I love you.” But that’s not the Disney way…


    3. The scene I chose to analyze was the opening scene with Cody saving the eagle. This scene, and the previous one leading up to it, showed that Cody cared about the animals and was willing to risk his life to save her. Climbing the cliff and working to free a fidgety eagle shows great bravery and selflessness to risk his life (and then fall off the cliff!). It also introduced Cody (and the eaglet eggs) as missing their father...

    The following scene with the eagle’s flight was breathtaking and the animation was really cool, but it felt evocative of so many other films—“Superman” (1978) with Superman and Lois flying in the clouds, “How to Train Your Dragon” (2010), etc. I’m not trying to say that this movie stole this idea from other movies as much as trying to make a point that as humans we relish the idea of feeling “free” and at one with nature, and I think that’s what this scene is trying to do (successfully, for me).


    8. The movie does progress the story of Bianca and Bernard and the Rescue Aid Society from “The Rescuers”. But largely, except for the marriage proposal, it feels like just a continuation of the RAS missions from the first movie. Not that that’s a bad thing at all.

    The movie also continues the recent disturbing trend of killing off the non-magical human villains at the end of the movie. McLeach is fed to the alligators but actually ends up going over a waterfall and presumably dying (along with Joanna?). I wonder if this reflects a change in societal views regarding suitable punishment for bad-doers (do they deserve to die?).


    9. Although this movie is a rescue/action film, I was taken by the environmental bent, and the whole “let’s protect endangered species” feel. So I picked this scene showing Cody and the eagle working and coexisting together in harmony.

    [​IMG]

    10. There really aren’t many pins for this movie, so I chose this pin (128142) because it’s got Cody and the eagle, along with Bernard, Bianca, and Jake.

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Jul 1, 2018
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  2. MerlinEmrys

    MerlinEmrys Hicitus Pinicus!

    Rating - 100%
    428   0   0

    1. Overall Impression
    Ah yes. We are firmly in the Disney Renaissance. This is certainly one of the earliest films I encountered, and even though I’m not a massive, diehard fan of the film, it’s hard not to like it. It’s so impressive, immersive, iconic for what we have come to expect out of Disney Animation and the deftness of storytelling. The characters are fleshed out more (still not perfect), and while there are pacing issues (“Les Poisson”…), the film superbly tells its story.

    This is one of those films where I have to remember that I can’t judge it too harshly for having had 32 years to think about it. Hahah! Sure Ariel could have just written out the situation (we know she can write because of her signing the contract), and there are other plot holes that make for better action. But on its own, I am constantly impressed by the film and entranced by its characters.


    2. Character Analysis
    Despite how tantalizing it would be to analyze Ursula, a friend of mine has written an exceptional academic paper on her, so anything I would provide would just be lifting out of it.

    Rather, let’s look at King Triton and his whole schtick (power) and perhaps how it mirrors Ursula. In the expanded mythos of the story, Ursula and Triton are siblings, each getting half of their father Poseidon’s power at his passing (Triton gets the trident, Ursula the magic shell). So in many ways the two are cut from the same cloth. And while their relationship isn’t expressed in the actual film, that connection still manifests.

    There are striking similarities in how the two characters interact with shadow and how that makes each of them threatening. Triton looming in Ariel’s Grotto, Ursula in her conch (and them makes a joke about lurking in doorways…).

    [​IMG]

    But even more telling is how both of them respond to the trident itself, which naturally represents pure power. When Triton is bemusing with Sebastian about who Ariel is in love with, he’s casually twirling and fingering the trident. When Ursula encounters Triton at the end of the film, she does a similar move and gingerly (tenderly?) touches the trident:

    [​IMG]

    The two are both obsessed with power, exercising power, and maintaining power. Where Triton realizes the damage it causes (“What have I done…”), Ursula revels in that destruction (her first act with the trident is to kill someone). The film has set the two of them up to be nice foils of each other, but still maintains that Triton is equally sinister/dangerous in his way. So perhaps it’s the power of the trident that is actually “corrupting”?


    3. Scene Analysis
    The opening scene, “Fathoms Below”, is brilliant—far more so than I had considered before sitting down for this watch-through. The film opens with the sailors on the ship talking about merpeople and the like. The audience’s first engagement with the film is with humans, despite the film’s title. So there’s a little confusion early on, perhaps. But as the little red fish escapes (IT’S A RED HERRING!), the audience follows it down to the undersea world. We are literally immersed in the world of the film—the music builds, we see the creatures of the ocean, we are traveling to the same destination (Atlantica palace) as the other sea creatures. It’s a brilliant, subtle move that connects us all the more with the main focus of the film.


    4. Song Analysis
    Similarly to “Fathoms Below”, “Part of Your World” executes an interesting maneuver to make sure the audience is connecting with the right character. One might forget that Sebastian is in this song quite a bit, and I was trying to figure out why he would be stealing the spotlight from Ariel’s big “I Want” number (though he does that basically the entire film….). But his purpose there is very specific: he provides an alternative to how we might view Ariel’s obsession and collection. Where Ariel/Flounder are awestruck and enamored with the gizmos, Sebastian is threatened, hurt, skeptical, and critical of them. So the song/scene gives us two ways to view it: positively or negatively. Obviously, we are supposed to side with Ariel and see the human stuff (which we, the audience of humans, see as our mundane junk) transformed into something magical. But because Sebastian gives us the option to not see it positively, we must make a choice. And the fact that we naturally choose to side with Ariel makes our connection with her that much stronger. Had Sebastian not been in the scene, it would just be Ariel singing about all her cool stuff and we would be like “Oh yeah, that’s cool stuff I guess.” But with Sebastian present, we consciously choose to see the stuff as magical, thus immersing us even more in this suspension of disbelief.


    (5. Symbol Analysis)
    I’m sure someone has talked about the symbolism of Ariel’s voice. But if not, I’ll come back and add that in. I wrote a paper about it and the changes made to the Broadway show and how it “saves” this heroine. I’m happy to side-bar that conversation if you’re interested! :D (@NutMeg)


    8. Progressions
    Very quickly. I think “Under the Sea” is the first in a new tradition of big Disney “show-stopper” songs that come at about the “intermission” moment, when the action of the movie is about to take a turn into the next phase. Here it’s “Under the Sea”, in Aladdin it’s “Friend Like Me” and so on. The fact that they’re starting to build their films and songs around a standard (Broadway/theatre) structure of storytelling adds even more to the success of these films. It’s as if they’ve found the “pulse” of the story and are really tapping into it. Or rather, found the pulse of what modern audiences wanted.


    9. Iconic Shot

    Is there even a contest? It’s gotta be the rock splash scene…

    [​IMG]


    10. Representative Pin
    Kind of a tough call. And I’ll be honest, I didn’t sift through all 42 pages of TLM pins… But here’s a good one!

    [​IMG]
    Pin 39956 Disney Auctions -The Little Mermaid Cast (Jumbo)

    Very reminiscent of the movie poster, but accomplishes all the major points of the film. :)

    Runner up:

    [​IMG]
    Pin 43142 Ariel - Fins to Feet (Spinner)

    I like the transformation idea. :)


    Spare Thoughts:
    *I enjoyed Sebastian way more this time than I ever have in the past. XD
     
  3. MerlinEmrys

    MerlinEmrys Hicitus Pinicus!

    Rating - 100%
    428   0   0

    (the screenshot database is down, so I'll have to add more pics later)

    1. Overall Impression
    This movie was plenty of fun, though not necessarily one full of substance. It had a simple, decent message, but focused more on situational humor and comedy tropes than really developing much more than they had to. That’s not to say I didn’t enjoy the movie, but I did and so much more than the original, but it’s just a simple, fun movie. They don’t have to be overly cerebral ;P


    2. Character Analysis
    Though McLeash would be a really interesting character to “put on the couch”, Bernard’s character development is more interesting. Jake as his counter to Bernard is a little heavy handed in the film—Jake is smarmy, debonair, full of himself, while Bernard is the total opposite. But to see Bernard come into his own is a nice conclusion to his character. Particularly when he wrangles the razorback the same way Jake did the moccasin. That was fun (if a little on the nose).


    3. Scene Analysis / 8. Progressions
    Even if the plot and tropes of this film were tired (or are now), the background work was STUNNING and did so much to really open the world up. When Cody and Marahute are flying through the clouds, it reminded me a lot of Aladdin and the magic carpet ride scene—so I’m wondering if this was the animators’ first foray into really wide open spaces and letting the majesty of the background do a lot of the work for them.

    [​IMG]


    7. Overall Goal
    As I said, this film is fairly simple with a basic message: be true to yourself (Bernard) and help those in need (R.A.S. and Cody). And the film accomplished that without a lot of pomp and circumstance. Again, the film leaned a bit too heavily on situational humor (Wilbur….), but that didn’t get too in the way of it delivering on its goal.


    9. Iconic Shot
    Cody and Marahute on the river will always be what I think of for this film. I think this film was what made me want to study birds of prey (long long ago…).

    [​IMG]

    (close second would be the waterfall jump)


    10. Representative Pin
    Not a whole lot to choose from here! But the Marahute silhouette is a nice touch on this one. :

    [​IMG]
    Pin 80583 Disney's Rescuers Down Under 20th Anniversary


    Spare Notes:
    * I really appreciated that they didn’t totally lean into animal species directly equaling personality types. The Koala was a total sass queen, but not the mellow (“high”) vibe that most popular depictions of koalas go. Of course, Frank was spastic, which is fairly classic lizard. XD

    *My biggest problem with this film is why can some animals talk and others can’t!! Joanna I’ll let go, but how come Marahute couldn’t talk? Was she above that somehow? It bothered me…

    *And accents! Why doesn’t Cody have an Australian accent? Would it be too off-putting for American audiences? Would it take away from Jake’s smarm? Not sure, but it bothered me.

    *MAAAAAAN those CG backgrounds were baaaaaaaad…… I get that it was only 1990, but geebus. The painted backgrounds were stunning, so to see those shitty CG cityscapes was just awful…
     
  4. timeerkat

    timeerkat Your Friend Who Likes To Play

    Rating - 100%
    237   0   0

    Little Mermaid Continued

    2. Max is one of the only two non-human human world characters we meet in the film (though Scuttle only sort of counts for me. He does live up with the humans, but he knows so little about them that he thinks Max is one of them). He is Eric's best friend, and adds some depth to Eric's character in this way.

    He is a big floppy-furred English Sheepdog, and while Disney has portrayed many big dogs as dopey (I think Nana is the one exception up to this point), Max is intelligent and perceptive. He is the only one on the ship to notice Ariel. His sense of small leads him to her, where he accepts her by licking her face. Later on, after Ariel comes to the surface after getting her legs, when he and Eric are walking on the beach, he smells her and instantly remembers her and leads Eric to her.

    He is also a great judge of character. He is friendly with Ariel right from the start, but growls at Vanessa when she walks by at her wedding. He also reflects Eric's view of things. When Eric's statue s revealed, Eric is not that happy with it, but doesn't want to insult Grimsby. Max is able to show Eric's displeasure by growling at it.


    9. This is my most iconic shot of the film. It's at the end of Part of Your World, where Ariel sings about her greatest desire. This shot shows the absolute longing she has to be up with the humans, capping off the lyrics with a physical representation.

    Her facial expression and reaching arm shows this deep longing, and the hole being too small for her to fit through represents the constraints her father puts on her achieving this desire.

    [​IMG]

    10. What single pin do you think best represents this film for you? Why? Give us the pin number and post a picture!

    The other iconic shot I think of from this movie was the one @Meritre chose - Ariel singing the Part of Your World Reprise, and right as she hits the last powerful note, the waves come crashing on the rocks behind her. The timing, framing, emotion - everything about that one moment is just powerful and perfect.

    [​IMG]
    Pin# 46300 - Disney Auctions - Ariel on Rock Jumbo Pin
     
  5. timeerkat

    timeerkat Your Friend Who Likes To Play

    Rating - 100%
    237   0   0

    Rescuers Down Under

    1. This film is another nostalgia bomb for me. At a local theater growing up, they would play children's movies once a week for really cheap. There was a choice of two movies, and I would ALWAYS choose Rescuers Down Under if it were an option (Fievel Goes West as well). I don't think I even saw the original until I was in my teens, and while I do like it, RDU will always be my favorite of the two. It does have its downsides, some of which I noticed more watching this time than when I was younger, but overall this is a solidly entertaining movie.

    Marahute is SO DAMNED MAJESTIC.

    [​IMG]

    The dynamic between McLeach and Joanna is interesting. They have a much more "I tolerate you since you provide something I need but feel no guilt over using you" vibe than any other villain/sidekick pairing we've seen. I mean, McLeach was ready to shoot Joanna before he saw the feather; meanwhile, Joanna ate an entire tin of eggs under McLeach's nose.

    It is odd that the movie is, for the most part, set in Australia, and yet several of the main characters have very little or no Australian accent. Take McLeach - is he a native Australian, or is he an American poacher who set up base in Australia? Cody has a bit of an Australian accent, but it's hardly noticeable except for the very beginning of the film.

    6. Jake: That's right! If anyone can get us out of this scrape it's old Berno! [aside] Nice bluff, Miss B.
    Bianca: I wasn't bluffing. You don't know Bernard like I do. He'll never give up.

    Jake is a portrayal of traditional masculinity- he's handsome, smart, strong, brave, and smooth. Then we have Bernard. He's more ordinary-looking, timid, quiet, and on the clumsy side. Jake, as an extension of society at large, doesn't really see him as capable to help in an emergency. Bianca, though, does know Bernard. She knows that there is much more to him than what is on the surface, and he always comes through when needed. He is strong in the ways that matter.


    8. If there is one movie to compare Rescuers Down Under to, it obviously would be the original Rescuers film. It brought back Bianca and Bernard, but introduced us to new characters as well. We see that Bernard and Bianca are still together, and their relationship has progressed to where Bernard is ready to propose to Bianca (which I really liked! So many movies go straight from a few days after they met to the wedding. It was refreshing to see a relationship at this stage.)

    Using The Rescuers as a basis for a sequel actually makes a lot of sense. Bernard and Bianca work for an organization that helps people in need. The first film was about saving Penny, but RAS keeps on going even after a case is solved. So making a sequel about another case makes perfect sense to me. (I could even see this as a TV series, in which each episode is another case they're working on.)

    I really liked the message relay scene. In the original, some mice find the message in a bottle, and RAS already has the bottle in the next scene without explanation as to how it got there. In RDU, we are shown exactly how the message makes its way to RAS. It also shows mouse ingenuity, using human systems to their benefit. This little scene goes a long way in expanding the world of The Rescuers.

    Comparisons:

    Art Style - While the backgrounds are gorgeous, RDU has a VERY 90's flat feel to the character artwork, and it's lost the sketchy quality of a lot of earlier films. While it's "cleaner," it doesn't seem as rich to me as in the first film and at times feels like a cheaper movie because of it.

    [​IMG] [​IMG]


    Characters - the existing characters from the first film (Bernard, Bianca, the RAS mice) seem a bit watered down in this one, especially Bianca. She had a lot to do in the first film, and the focus between Bernard and Bianca was pretty even, whereas in RDU it feels like she was mainly used to add tension between Jake and Bernard and the movie focused more heavily on Bernard.
    Cultural Depictions - Unlike in The Rescuers, they made every mouse delegate the same color in RDU, so they resorted to using costumes (and facial features, including the stereotypical slanted eyes and Fu Manchu for the Japanese mouse) to differentiate between cultures:

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    They also had delegates from individual African countries, not just one for all of Africa, which was a nice update.

    [​IMG]

    9. Like everyone else has said, the most iconic scene in the entire film is Cody flying with Marahute. The artwork is gorgeous, the scenery is breathtaking, and it shows the love and trust they have for each other even after just meeting.

    [​IMG]

    10. What single pin do you think best represents this film for you? Why? Give us the pin number and post a picture!

    There are very few RDU pins, and none that show the flying scene. This is the closest I could find. I like how it shows the sense of adventure the movie creates :

    [​IMG]

    Pin# 6004 - DLR - 75th Anniversary One Sheet Framed St (Rescuers Down Under)
     
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  6. pincrazy

    pincrazy Active Member

    Rating - 100%
    7   0   0

    There definitely seems to be a change with this movie, and a return to something special and classic.
    1) My overall impression: well presented, beautiful animation and story. Disney has returned in making a princess movie with heart, and rejuvenated the love for animation storytelling. Most importantly it's packaged in a Happy, Cute, Beautiful musical escape!
    2) I connected with King Triton, although never a king or a father, being a single parent I always felt I was both. Ssomehow a father has a diffetent relationship with their daughters than mothers. It's more of expectamcy in finding a direction and possibly following rules, and discipline.....although firm and frustration there's a conflict of letting go.
    3) The scene I selected: Ariel and Flounder go to the sunken ship. The lighting, hair, movement, discovery of treasure, and being chased by a shark sets up the imagination of this movie, along with the companionship of friends. It's a step into another world, and fascination with what we don't know. The curiosity(if allowed) of youth and discovery, desire....also the protectiveness parents want/need to impose.
    4) Part of Your World seems to be a song about dteams, differences and comparisons, and explains materialism isn't everything! Hence I put this correlation into our hobby and puts pin trading/collecting into perspective! : p (I've got gadgets and gizmos aplenty, I've got whozits and whatzits galore. You want thingamabobs, i got 20. But who cares, No big deal-
    I Want More!) :stitch:
    The song has more depth to it than this, just these lines resonates with me over pins, and reminds me of the anxiousness and curiosity of young adulthood, while feeling they know themselves.
    7) Overall goal seemed to be:
    carefully select decisions there's consequences, love isn't easy especially getting kissed, friends are true friends, Fathers sacrifice for their daughter's happiness/life, under the sea is magical, mermen are hunks at least King Triton is, and Disney animation/storytelling has returned in glorious form!

    10) I'm glad I'm not an Ariel collector just so Many Pins! :p
    #36939 falls into the grail category!
    Here's my 5 for the week, and trying to squeeze in my extra credit before cutoff! ;)
     
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  7. unibear

    unibear DPF Charter Member DPF Charter Member

    Rating - 100%
    51   0   0

    You might have hit the nail on the head with this. It REALLY bothered me that McLeach was singing a bastardized version of "Home on the Range"! I mean, that's an AMERICAN song, not an Australian song. Maybe he IS originally from the US...
     
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  8. coblj003

    coblj003 DPF Charter Member DPF Correspondent

    Rating - 100%
    26   0   0

    I'm on holiday so I have to keep it short :).
    I think it is safe to say that The little mermaid brought Disney back on the maps in terms of animation relevance.
     
  9. pincrazy

    pincrazy Active Member

    Rating - 100%
    7   0   0

    Here we goooooo, yay extra credit!!!
    1) Overall-without trying to be sexist, I'd say Little Mermaid is to young females, Rescuers Down Under is for young males, only in that the relationship of the main character and adventure is of that gender. This animation is full of energy, offers geography, biology, and conservation as lessons and has an Indiana Jones feel. It's somewhat of a sequel, in that it uses 2 of the main characters from the previous film, but other than that it's a separate story into itself, and can be enjoyed without ever having to have seen the first. The film is endearing and gives me hope and a reminder that we all can help/need to save all living species of this planet.
    3) The sequence when Cody rescues Marahute and their relationship begins. It's magical how the animators captured the movements of the bird and the boy not only in flight (which resembled Aladdin and Jasmine on the carpet), but also the playfulness and emotions conveyed when she reveals her nest and eggs.
    5) The symbol in this film seemed to be the feather, not only was it golden in color (signifying wealth/rarity/value), but explained it's species and size.
    7) Seemed overall goal was exploring another part of our planet, we're on a travel excursion to a different continent so different to what we're use to. It's an exposure to different terrain, life, animals, and geography. As mentioned earlier it's also about conservation and exposing the audience in an introductory way to poaching of animals.
    8) From these past 2 films animators have opened our minds and imagination to new creative destinations! From the ocean/sea to an island/continent; each so diverse and different in it's own context, from mainland USA. The stories and themes all have the basic good vs bad element, love wamting to be attained or protected, but now we're exploring and existing in different elements that we hadn't before....stretching our advemture a bit more, hence heightening the experiemce of an animated film...there's a message beyond the art. The progression is going beyond the story told by different characters it's the viewer experiencing...seems similar to the next step, or transition....example is black and white to color, or 16mm to IMAX. Hope this all makes sense, it's an imaginative sensory connection beyond just emotion relationships....
    Hope i made cutoff :stitch:
     
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  10. coblj003

    coblj003 DPF Charter Member DPF Correspondent

    Rating - 100%
    26   0   0

    I'll have to keep analysis short, going to meet up with family later.
    [​IMG]
    1. Overall Impression
    There is a reason that this movie is still beloved by far, TLM marks the return of the princess franchise and the start the Disney animation renaissance. The production values seem to have increased compared to the previous films and the decision to include a very memorable broadway style soundtrack was groundbreaking. I got to watch to this movie with my daughters on the way to San Diego from Illinois. It definitely peaked their interest during it and they were very excited to see a certain princess at the park.

    7. Goal of film.
    Be careful of making deals with the devil. Ursula's deceitful promise is biblically similar to the serpent promising knowledge to Eve. In this instance, Ariel is quite naive to understanding a contract that is too good to be true, exchanging her most distinguishing talent for a chance(against all odds) at falling in love with the object of her desire.

    8. Progressions
    The fact that this marks the return of another Public Domain Library fairy tale possibly means that they wanted to save money on production costs, it's actually hard to believe this princess is only number four official one in the line up. It also marks another instance of Disneyfying(diluting) the storyline of the original work. In this instance the princess ends up with the prince versus killing herself when she finds out her "beloved" is happily married already...

    9. Iconic Shot
    [​IMG]
    It's a no brainer, this is by far the movie's iconic screenshot. It represents the climax reprisal of her the part of your world.

    10. Representative pin
    Pin 101267 WDW - Piece of Disney History 2014 - SpectroMagic - Ariel
    [​IMG]
    This may not be representative itself of the movie but it is one of my favorite pins as it comes from the parade I got to see close at WDW before the return of the ELP. Ironically I have never seen Ariel wear this shawl, she was actually shoulderless when it was in the 30's in FL so let's say she was very animated that night lol.
     
    Last edited: Jul 1, 2018
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  11. MerlinEmrys

    MerlinEmrys Hicitus Pinicus!

    Rating - 100%
    428   0   0

    [​IMG] [​IMG]
    Beauty and the Beast (1991) AND BONUS DuckTales: Treasure of the Lost Lamp (1991)

    Monday is our "wrap-up" discussion on The Little Mermaid and The Rescuers Down Under. So you're welcome to respond to other analyses throughout the day.

    However, you may not post any more full analyses for The Little Mermaid and The Rescuers Down Under to count for completion toward the 52 Challenge. No late homework. ;P

    Also, we have a Bonus Film this week!. Generally, the conversation will lean on the primary film (Beauty and the Beast), so if you can only watch one, go for that one. But you can watch both and do a separate analysis for each and earn two "points" toward your 52 Challenge! :)

    ~Merlin
     
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  12. MerlinEmrys

    MerlinEmrys Hicitus Pinicus!

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    428   0   0

    Whoo! I've finally giving this a good solid update. :) If you've posted anything since Black Cauldron, might want to go double check and make sure your medal is there. :3
     
  13. Meritre

    Meritre Active Member

    Rating - 100%
    2   0   0

    This weeks movie is, as you can guess from my avatar and signature one of my favourites :D
     
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  14. DeputyDonald

    DeputyDonald Active Member

    Rating - 100%
    3   0   0

    This weeks showings are my favorite!
     
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  15. timeerkat

    timeerkat Your Friend Who Likes To Play

    Rating - 100%
    237   0   0

    Whooooo, Jake is the stamp for RDU! :3

    I don’t think I’ve ever seen Lost Lamp, so this will be fun!
     
  16. unibear

    unibear DPF Charter Member DPF Charter Member

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    Well, this is number 2 in the Disney Renaissance, and its success helped convince critics and fans that the success of “The Little Mermaid” wasn’t a fluke!

    1. My overall impression of the movie… Several things:

    The introductory musical motif sounds SO MUCH like the Carnival of the Animals—Aquarium by Camille Saint-Saëns (also used in the “Impressions of France” in Epcot)! This motif also reappears in the movie a couple of times (Beast leading Belle away from the prison cell in the corridor with the gargoyles, when Beast frees Gaston and goes to Belle).

    If you haven’t seen Todrick Hall’s version of “Belle” (Beauty and the Beat), you need to.


    Apparently the sheep and Gaston have similar reactions to Belle reading books. To his credit, at least Gaston doesn’t try to eat the book…

    The version I watched had the added song, “Human Again”. Perhaps I’m just remembering the old version, but the addition of this song feels completely disjoint and seems to slow the movie down without adding much. Although it does explain how the ballroom was spic-and-span that evening for their date.

    Most mobs aren’t actually this self-aware: “We don’t like what we don’t understand. In fact, it scares us, and this monster is mysterious at least.”


    2. and 4. (and 8.) The character I chose to analyze was Gaston. Of course, he’s the villain but I’m going to focus on another aspect of him; namely, his masculinity and maleness. Gaston is the epitome of masculinity—he’s handsome, muscular, hairy, and loves to hunt, and the song “Gaston” celebrates Gaston’s masculine wiles. In the song, Gaston’s virtues are mostly physical (muscles, hair, neck, etc.) or boorish behaviors (fighting, biting, expectorating, etc.), and during the song it becomes clear that Gaston’s response to just about everything is to be physical (and punch LeFou).

    In many respects, the character of Gaston is a representation of the oppressive societal patriarchy of the time period. Gaston’s view of marriage is that the man hunts and earns a living, and the “little missus” cooks and cleans and takes care of the little ones. He also sees it as the male’s decision to decide whom he marries and the woman is simply supposed to accept this decision. Finally, he believes (and actually says) “it’s not right for a woman to read. Soon she starts getting ideas… and thinking,” and clearly that’s not a good thing for the status quo of the patriarchy.

    However, Gaston’s character is also dominated (defined?) by his vanity. He can’t seem to walk past a shiny surface without admiring himself—literally Narcissistic, based on the Greek myth. His handsomeness and his superficiality also propagates his overconfidence—the only trait he values in females is beauty, so why shouldn’t his own beauty also translate into his a strong sense of worthiness? Gaston chooses Belle to be his bride because she’s “the most beautiful girl in town. That makes her the best!” Even after his rejection by Belle, he still wants to marry her—presumably because she’s still the most beautiful and he doesn’t really seem to care what she thinks of him (handsome, rude, conceited, boorish, and brainless).

    Gaston’s fixation with his physical appearance is mirrored (and contrasted) in Beast’s concern over his physicality. But while Gaston has never met a shiny surface he didn’t love, Beast destroyed the mirrors (and portraits) that reminded him that he is not physically appealing. To Beast’s credit, his ideas do evolve in his interactions with Belle while Gaston’s ideas do not.

    In my analysis of “Pete’s Dragon”, I pointed out how Dr. Terminus was a precursor for Gaston. I’ll only briefly repeat it here: Dr. Terminus dismissed Nora’s father’s claim that there was a dragon in town and attributed it to his drunken state (just as Gaston dismissed Maurice’s claim of a beast to his “insanity”). Once Terminus realizes there is a dragon, he is intent on hunting and killing it so he can sell him for parts ($$), just as Gaston’s first reflex upon learning about the Beast is to kill him (not necessarily for $$, but for pride and renown).


    3. The scene I chose to analyze was the transformation scene at the end. Beast has been stabbed and is convinced he is dying, so he is saying goodbye to Belle. Belle finally admits her feelings too late, and it appears that Beast is dead and all is lost. Now, give me some credit—I know this is a Disney movie and a happy ending is just around the corner. But the writers/animators played this scene for drama, and it seems like the darkness/sadness lasts a bit too long (especially the first time you see it). I will say that the new live-action film plays this EVEN longer and to equal but perhaps more melodramatic effect.

    Then the jubilant music starts, the animated “fireworks” falling from the sky start and the scene is spectacular. The music is at its symphonic best and the animated transformation is EPIC. I was particularly impressed with the way they can animate beams of light so successfully and the transformation from beast to human was very cool. Then, they transform the WHOLE CASTLE! Wow! Very cool scene!


    5. (and 4.) I symbol I chose to analyze was the library. Right before this scene, Beast admits to having strong feeling for Belle to Cogsworth and wants to do something for her. Cogsworth suggests “flowers, chocolates, promises you don’t intend to keep…”, but Lumiere suggests some special that sparks her interest. Then we see Beast leading Belle into the library, and he’s like a little kid, so giddy with anticipation at her response. This whole scene shows a change in Beast’s attitude—Belle is now more of a friend than a prisoner, and it shows that Beast has made a connection with who she is and not with what she looks like (something Gaston would never do).

    This immediately leads to “Something There” (this is a mini song analysis), in which we now see that Belle has made a similar connection based on who Beast is and not what he looks like. To be fair, I believe that Belle never judged Beast on his physicality. When she met him he looked like a beast and acted like a beast, and she treated him like a beast because of his actions not his looks. I think it took Beast a bit of time to realize this, and then he changed his actions. To his amazement, Belle’s attitude to him changed and he realized that she didn’t hate his beastly appearance, just his initial beastly demeanor. I would also point out that these scenes feel like the start of a FRIENDSHIP and not confirmation of love; however, I do feel that this is the first step to them falling in love.


    6. and 7. I’ve already hinted at this above, but the phrase I chose to analyze was from the narrator: “But she (the Enchantress) warned him not to be deceived by appearances. For beauty is found within.” I also believe that this is the whole point of this movie.

    Many of the characters are guilty of this conflation of appearance and reality.

    • Beast: Beast judged the Enchantress by her appearance, and paid the price. Then, he judged himself to be unworthy because of his new appearance. He also initially judged Belle as being unwilling to fall in love with him because, “She’s so beautiful. And… well, LOOK AT ME!”
    • Gaston: Gaston judged Belle to be “the one” because of her appearance. He doesn’t care who she is or what she wants, as long as she’s pretty.
    • Townsfolk: They all seem to love Gaston because he’s handsome, and don’t seem to care that he’s superficial, selfish, or evil. Also, they immediately judge the image of Beast in the mirror as evil because of the way he looks (and with Gaston’s proding).

    Belle seems to be immune from this problem. She clearly recognizes Gaston as handsome, but she sees his many bad qualities as well. She also seems to treat Beast based on his actions and not his outward appearance.


    8. This movie continues to build on the whole princess trope that “Little Mermaid” did, so comparisons of these two movies are inevitable.

    • “Beauty and the Beast” feels more Broadway than “Little Mermaid”, and I think this is why it was the first film to make it to Broadway and LM hasn’t.
    • Phillipe reminds me of Max in that they were both animated as “animals with humanized behaviors” instead of “humans in animal form”. I think it’s important in this movie for Phillipe and the wolves to be more animalistic, so that Beast stands out as the only human in animal form!
    • Belle seems to be the most fully realized princess to date. Much like Ariel, she’s more brave and adventurous than those from the 50’s or earlier, but Belle is more educated and more strong willed. She’s probably braver than Ariel, in that she trades her freedom to free her dad (instead of the other way around in LM) and she stands up to Beast after his temper tantrum (see next comment).
    • Apparently “good guys” in Disney princess movies are allowed to have temper tantrums (hissy fits) as long as they seem repentant and remorseful afterward. Hence, King Triton and Beast both blow up at their respective princesses, driving them to run away. But at least they feel BAD about it. Hmm…


    9. I’m guessing that we’re all going to agree that the ballroom scene is the most iconic… Stitch!

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    10. OK, I’ve always loved this 4-pin set of the stained glass from this movie (39807). I wish they’d make ALL of the stained glass panes into pins if they could get the quality of image that this one does.

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Jul 4, 2018
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  17. Meritre

    Meritre Active Member

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    Looks like Pinforum was down for the last few hours... anyway, here is part one:


    Beauty and the Beast (1991)
    1. What is your overall impression of the film? Some possible talking points include: what you did or did not like about it; what about the film has stuck with you; what did you find different on this viewing; how would modern audiences respond to this (for the older films)… The list goes on. Hahah!
    One of my favourites from my childhood! (I’ll say the same about Aladdin and The Lion King – those are big childhood favourites, although I only saw The Lion King in a movie theatre. Mulan joins this club, too, a little later.)
    This is also the only Disney movie I’ve seen stage. The additional songs and scenes added a lot to the whole. The theatre was allowed to do a non-replica version, so it is not a copy of the Boradway version but still great!
    I’ve watched the movie quite often in recent years, also with English dub but this time I choose to switch between the voices. It’s always fun to watch this movie. I have both the extended and the original version (because I’m greedy and had to have it with german dub, too. I’m crazy.)
    I watched the extended version and I think it fits in the movie wonderfully – but that’s perhaps because I think I saw the extended version first and was surprised later to see that scene when I got another copy and it was missing. But I’m not sure about this.
    Only Cogsworth and Chip got their names translated in the movie but Cogsworth is sometimes called Cogsworth, sometimes Mr. Tic-Tac. (Or should it be Tic-Toc, like the name of the crocodile from Peter Pan? The main point, imitating the ticking sound of a clock, is the same.) I think it is a nickname for teasing him since it comes from Lumiére. In the musical they all got their names translated, with Cogsworth getting a completely new name.
    I love and rewatch this film so often because its message stuck me more than any other Disney movies message.

    2. Choose one specific character to analyze. You can explore how a character acts, what they say, how they dress, etc. to explain what they may represent or their function and meaning in the narrative. Try to avoid obvious "plot" stuff (ex: the Evil Queen is a villain, so her purpose is to be bad...), but explore unique and specific elements about the character (ex: the EQ is surrounded by images of peacocks, further suggesting her obsession with vanity). You may also use these elements to explain why you connected or disconnected from the character.
    Have to go with Belle of course! I have always felt strongly connected to her since she feels she’s considered odd and is something like an outcast in her hometown. I guess this is quite common nowadays and also helps the watchers sympathise with Belle.
    She is also a modern, intelligent young lady, who loves books and tales (also a trait we share) and is polite (or at least tries to be) even if she doesn’t like the person she is interacting with. She greats Gaston and tries to be friendly to him but when he is too much to say the least, she finds a smart way to get rid of him quickly.
    Now I’m going through her wardrobe. (not the talking one:D) I suppose everybody here already knows that in her town she’s the only one who wears blue? It was to make her stand out in the crowd, the willagers mostly wore earthy colors, brown, red and green are popular. Back to Belles blue dress and white blouse. Blue is often associated with Mary, mother of Jesus and so with purity and white also often represent purity. It shows that Belle doesn’t judge and gives everybody a chance. Later, Beast is also seen wearing a blue cape and part of his formal attire is blue as well, showing his connection to Belle. Next is her green dress, green is associated with nature and spring and Belle is actually like spring for the inhabitants of the castle. She switches to a pink dress when she starts to fall for Beast. Pink and red are often used as the colors of love. Her golden ballgown is the last new outfit she wears – gold stands of course for wealth but I think in this case it is more like she is rich in her heart – she gives it to the beast (who appears to be quite wealthy, so in this sense, Belle becomes a part of the rich family, too)
    It’s a great addition that although she is seen as a perfect looking girl, she does has her flaws and that was built in in her appearance – I read somewhere that the stray lock of hair that keeps falling in her face was meant to stand for her being imperfect. She also doesn’t care for her own beauty – showing that she cares more for what’s inside and doesn’t think looks that important.
    Curiosity is another of her core traits that makes her read all the books and makes her want adventures.

    3. Choose one specific scene or sequence to analyze—tell me what response is it trying to evoke from the viewer and how does it go about getting that response? Your analysis could include the scene’s use of color, action, camera angles, music, character development, setting, backdrop, style, etc. If you can justify it with evidence from the scene, then it’s an analysis!
    I choose the scene where Belle meets Mrs Potts for the first time. The last scene, Gaston, was bright and happy, just the opposite of the coming scene and the desparate call for help from Maurice “Will no one help me” connects the two beautifully, connected to the previuos one through the events, and the place and throught the mood to the coming scene.
    Belle is just as desparate as her father and lonely and hopeless and her dark room reflects that, too. As Mr’s Potts arrives and Belle is comforted a little, more colors can be seen and more light is used.
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
    It also shows Belles accepting nature, she is surprised at first because the objects are alive but then accepts them quickly as friends, jusdging them by their actions (being very kind to her) and not their apperances. She’s not accepting the beast as long as he stays aggressive and violent and only that.
    The scene is also a first step to discover the castle and to meet a new character. (For Belle, there are several new faces but the watchers have already met Mrs Potts and Chip)

    4. Choose one song to analyze—tell me what response is it trying to evoke from the viewer and how does it go about getting that response? What purpose does this song have in the film and does it succeed in that purpose?
    I think I’ll go with Gaston. It’s the song I like the least but at least there is something I can say about it. This song celebrates how gorgeous Gaston is (with himjoining in the celebrating) and how everybody toadeats him (no wonder that he is so full of himself is he is worshipped so much – but which was first? Was he first full of himself and gorgeous and then the townspeople started to admire him or did they admire him from the start, thinking him gorgeous and so he became full of himself and vain and all? I think a bit of both and this is an endless circle) The song also shows that Gaston is also a spoilt brat and is pretty much there where Beast stared before the curse: handsome but spoilt. While Beast, with the help of Belle (and the Enchantress) learns of his mistakes, Gaston stays the way he is, just as he is portrayed in this song: strong, handsome, every man want’s to be like him, he’s every girls dream, an ideal husband, an excellent hunter and everything a girl could ask for. Or so he thinks.
    It also shows his cruelty and love for violence: he joins in in the fighting and his brain starts to work when he hears mean and cruel things, like ‘crazy old Maurice’. (His red shirt also indicates his aggressive nature he shows during the song. Anger was the red one in Inside out too :) He also wears read for his wedding.)
    It also shows that he kind of rules the town and people often take over his opinions and so it is easy for him to manipulate the townspeople, in that way, it also helps to buld the story and prepare things for the Mob song.
    For my part the song did it’s best to think Gaston disgusting and altogether repulsing. (Even more repulsing than after his failed attempt to marry Belle.)

    5. Choose one specific symbol in the film to analyze. A symbol is typically something inanimate, an object, rather than a character. So don’t say “Brer Bear represents dumb people,” as that’s more of a character analysis than a symbol. Rather, think about specific objects (jewelry, clothing, houses, food, weapons, etc.) What does this symbol mean and how does that meaning impact the film?
    I think I’ll go with the rose as the symbol of hope (as long as the rose is there, there is still hope the curse breaks) and hopelessness (just look at the beast how desperate he becomes every time he looks at the rose) at the same time and it also gives the curse and braking it a physical form and is a constant reminder (here in the movie) and a symbol of love (generally). It can also stand for time flowing by – it doesn’t stop withering and serves as a kind of hour-glass for the cursed people. It also connects the movie to the fairytale that served as inspiration since Belle asked for a single rose from her father in it and he waspunished by the beast for stealing one of his roses.
     
  18. Meritre

    Meritre Active Member

    Rating - 100%
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    part 2:
    6. Choose a single line of dialog that you find to be the most significant/impactful line in the film and why. You can be a little loose with the “single line” bit, but let’s not go for Maleficent’s entire monologue to Philip... Rather, something like Stitch’s “This is my family. I found it all on my own. It’s little, and broken, but still good. Yeah – still good.” (brb weeping).
    There are several great lines that sum up the main, most dominant message of the movie beautifully. I go with this one, Belles line “He’s no monster Gaston. You are!” It’s not the looks that define who’s a monster and who’s the good guy. Looks are not that important but what’s within. It’s also quite brave to tell that Gaton straight in the face. But the truth has to be said.

    7. What is this film’s overall goal? Is it to teach a specific lesson (what is it) or get an emotional response (such as)? Or both? And how well or poorly does the film succeed in that goal? Be specific!
    I think it tries to teach not to judge somebody by the appearance and try and look past is. Beeing beautiful doesn’t automatically mean you’re good and being ugly does’nt mean you’re bad. It kind of ruined for me that I never thought the Beast ugly and thought Gaston is way uglier, even as a child :) Beast also makes so funny faces! He definitely manages children to like him hut his being ugly doesn’t come through really well, at least for me.
    Another message I get from it is that it is okay to be different and not fitting in the crowd. I think this message is a bit more fleshed out in the musical, when Beast and Belle talk about this during the library-reading together scene. (The one change I did not like in the musical was that Belle doesn’t teach Beast to read but simply reads it for him. I’d like to believe that Beast learns to read after he discovers what books can do. It also tells tales what he thinks about himself when he quickly changes who to what whan he talks about himself. I think his violence was besides being desperate and hopeless a way to hide his vulnerability. Back to the movie. For those who are interested, I did a whole blogpost about the musical version when the live action version came out: world of dolls and other things: Beauty and the Beast - the musical)

    8. What connections or progressions do you see in this film to past films? Example: how does Sleeping Beauty progress (or digress?) the princess archetype built in Cinderella? Be specific! Also, consider what use there is in returning to or re-imagining those elements?
    It keeps on building the stronger, active princess character. Belle is also a ‘fish out of the water’ just like Ariel and I thin for her it is even stronger. She wasn’t looking for a prince or love, just a friend with whom she could share imaginary (books) and real life adventures. She also keeps some traits from the previous girls, for example she is friends with birds and other animals she knows well. (Philippe the horse). She is also saved by her prince from the wolves so that sonnects her to the three classical princesses but she also saves her prince – she breaks the curse with her love and pulls him up to the balcony when Gaston stabs him and both of them loose balance. Gaston falls but Beast is pulled up by Belle (She must be incredibly strong. But she managed to put him on Philip when he was wounded, so…)
    The stained glass window pictures framing the movie connects this movie to the other fairytales with using a book as an opening but is something new (although in the DVD version I own, we slide into a book to get into the menu, that is actually a sign in the middle of Belles hometown)

    9. What is the iconic shot of the film? What single frame of animation do you find to be the most memorable and why? Post it! You can check out this link to find some great screencaps to help!
    Definitely a shot from the dancing scene, possibly one from the end. This one won:
    [​IMG]

    10. What single pin do you think best represents this film for you? Why? Give us the pin number and post a picture!
    It has everything in it what I wanted and this picture was also a runner up for iconic shot.
    Pin 16133 WDW - Beauty and the Beast DVD Release
    [​IMG]



    Stray thoughts:
    The first thing I “met” from this movie is a coloring book my sister got for her birthday. The cover is the same picture that Merlin used to represent the movie. We still have it today! But we didn’t know the movie so Belle got a dress that had all the rainbows colors, mainly pink and purple and violet and teal and blue. I guess we weren’t so wrong with purple and pink as she wears these colors instead of blue and white. I guess this was quite a last minute change, since I’ve even seen dolls pressed in the pink-purple version of the outfit. The prince got gray hair and a black suit. I remember talking it over and we agreed that he’s noe old it just looks good on him.

    How come when Belle sits with the sheeps there is a picture of prince charming in the book but when Gaston looks the book through he doesn’t find any? Must be his hatred for woman reading – it makes him blind. But I also think she doesn’t only dislike women reading but books altogether. Possible exception is a picturebook full of pictures of him (and maybe one or two of his trophies)

    I think Adam is not a bad name for the prince since it means – among others – human.

    Also most people prefer his beast form to his human form and I read somewhere that knowing that, the animators didn’t put that much effort in his human design. I like both his forms equally. :) But I prefer the Beasts castle with the monster statues (They’re based on conceptart for the Beast before he reached his final look he has in the movie) to the princes castle with the angels and all :)

    The hun dub has many voices that’ll return in later movies.

    Belle has Jasmines speaking voice but I saw Aladdin before Beauty and the Beast so it is Jasmines voice for me. Gastons voice actor returns later as Timon from The Lion King, and as far as I could discover, he also helped to fill in Cogsworths parts in the added scene including Human again. Lumiéres voice actor also lent his voice to Phil from Hercules and returns as the voice of Cogsworth in the live action version. Lefou and adult Simba also share the voice actor and Monsieur D’Arque has Scars voice. The strange is that none of these bothered me, in Lefous and Gastons case I only noticed it because I looked it up. Now that’s what I call talent. :) Sorry for the rant, but I thought it might be interesting that so very different characters can share the voice actor. Definitely interesting choices if you ask me.

    I love Belles original voice, Paige O’Haradid a wonderful job I like her voice even a bit better, than Belles hungarian voice. :)

    I read somewhere that Beast was practically evolwing backwards: he was wearin less and less clothes and was becoming more and more like an animal. If Belle wouldn’t have come, he would have gone sooner or later to live in the woods. Belles presence turned that around and he started wearing a shirt again and behave more like humans do. (Like bathing? And eating with a spoon :))

    I also picked up somewhere (I do read a lot about Beauty and the Beast, don’t I?) a comment that Beasts castly will be totally empty when the curse breaks as everything they have becomes human again. While I don’t agree with this (See Belles bed – a completely normal bed, not someone enchanted to be a bed) it still sounds funny. They’ll certainly need to pick up some things from IKEA though, the prince needs to have a proper room. :)

    Now let’s see if I can manage to squeeze in a second movie :)
     
    Last edited: Jul 5, 2018
  19. unibear

    unibear DPF Charter Member DPF Charter Member

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    I love that we both picked the same iconic scene AND the same image in the pin! And we also critiqued Gaston. Great minds think alike!
     
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  20. Meritre

    Meritre Active Member

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    We did something similar with the Little Mermaid, too! :) Same pin there, too.
     
  21. Meritre

    Meritre Active Member

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    So, I'm trying to do an extra here... it turned out really short and nothing interesting but maybe.. so, here you go. it is so short that it fits well into one post:

    BONUS DuckTales: Treasure of the Lost Lamp (1991)

    1. What is your overall impression of the film? Some possible talking points include: what you did or did not like about it; what about the film has stuck with you; what did you find different on this viewing; how would modern audiences respond to this (for the older films)… The list goes on. Hahah!
    It’ very different from the previous movies and it happens a lot more and in a shorter time, too than in the last few movies – the pacing is different, obviously. I guess it is because it started as a series and the movie came after that. It felt a bit like a ride on a roller-coaster. As it progresses it becomes more and more like a prototype for Aladdin.
    Just like Belle was immune to the judging by looks problem (I have to look up who wrote that in the Beauty and the Beast analyse) the little duckkids were immune to the greed and powerhunger the others suffered from.


    2. Choose one specific character to analyze. You can explore how a character acts, what they say, how they dress, etc. to explain what they may represent or their function and meaning in the narrative. Try to avoid obvious "plot" stuff (ex: the Evil Queen is a villain, so her purpose is to be bad...), but explore unique and specific elements about the character (ex: the EQ is surrounded by images of peacocks, further suggesting her obsession with vanity). You may also use these elements to explain why you connected or disconnected from the character.
    I think I’ll goo with the genie. Although this movie is very different from the others it struck me at once that the genie in this one and the Genie from Aladdin share many common traits, like not likeing sitting in the lamp for that long and they also share their love for fun and for goofing around. Both are also playfuland have a wish which comes true in the end, both dispose of the big home of the main characters because the new, evil master wishes for that.
    His bright colors indiciate his happy, fun loving nature.
    This genie boy actually wants to be a real boy a kid with all the fun children have (Has he thought about going to school?)


    3. Choose one specific scene or sequence to analyze—tell me what response is it trying to evoke from the viewer and how does it go about getting that response? Your analysis could include the scene’s use of color, action, camera angles, music, character development, setting, backdrop, style, etc. If you can justify it with evidence from the scene, then it’s an analysis!
    I think I’ll go with the part where the castle changes back into Scrooge McDucks home, so I get to look at my beloved colors. At the beginning, it is all dark and purple, which is Merlocks color (he’s dressed in purple – whenecer he happens to be in his normal form) than it becomes lighter and yellow and red as the house appears again – it is a symbol of their victory.
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
    There are no characters shown in those few frames so it works well as a symbol. It is really funny that in the previous movie, Beauty and the Beast, red and yellow were the villains colors and much later, in Tangled it will be just the other way around: the royal heroines color is purple and the villains color is red. Perhaps this indicates that Scrooge McDuck is not the usual kind of hero and he is still greedy at the end of the movie (some villainous characteristics), chasing Dijon while his nephews only thought about money when they needed it to save Scrooge.


    4. Choose one song to analyze—tell me what response is it trying to evoke from the viewer and how does it go about getting that response? What purpose does this song have in the film and does it succeed in that purpose?
    I couldn’t find any other song than the end credits song which is generally about adventures and isn’t really connected especially to the movie. I think it would work better as an opening but it was okay as a closing, too. No wonder as it is the opening song to the series. It does a good job setting the mood so I’d have loved to have it at the beginning, too.


    5. Choose one specific symbol in the film to analyze. A symbol is typically something inanimate, an object, rather than a character. So don’t say “Brer Bear represents dumb people,” as that’s more of a character analysis than a symbol. Rather, think about specific objects (jewelry, clothing, houses, food, weapons, etc.) What does this symbol mean and how does that meaning impact the film?
    I couldn’t think of any better symbol than the lamp – it symbolizes power and wealth and whoever owns the lamp has them. Its golden color also helps with it, gold and yellow is often associated with money. But as the lamp is nothing without the genie, wealth and power are nothing withour a clever mind to use them.


    6. Choose a single line of dialog that you find to be the most significant/impactful line in the film and why. You can be a little loose with the “single line” bit, but let’s not go for Maleficent’s entire monologue to Philip... Rather, something like Stitch’s “This is my family. I found it all on my own. It’s little, and broken, but still good. Yeah – still good.” (brb weeping).
    If I ever get my money back I promise I’ll never make another wish for myself again
    This is the moment when Scrooge McDuck realizes that he has been too greedy and perhaps changes a tiny bit for the better. It sums up one of the messages of the movie – being greedy is bad. It is even strengthened by the next scene when his family comes and pays for him to be able to leave with all their money from their piggy banks.


    7. What is this film’s overall goal? Is it to teach a specific lesson (what is it) or get an emotional response (such as)? Or both? And how well or poorly does the film succeed in that goal? Be specific!
    I think the movie teaches about being greedy and of course – careful what you wish for. It is also great for just having fun. Scrooge McDuck learns the later lesson (maybe a bit about being greedy, too) and makes a wise decision in the end by wishing for the genie to become a boy.


    8. What connections or progressions do you see in this film to past films? Example: how does Sleeping Beauty progress (or digress?) the princess archetype built in Cinderella? Be specific! Also, consider what use there is in returning to or re-imagining those elements?
    It uses common fairytale elements, elements from eastern tales (One Thousand and One Nights) like finding treasure and three wishes. At least one of the tales from One Thousand and One Nights, "Ali Baba and the Forty Thieves" to be precise is considered more or less true, as something that actually happened and other things that happened after the events in the original tale. I can find more connections to Aladdin which came out not much later.
    I found one element that connects it to previuos movies: the genie wishes to be a real boy – just like Pinoccio! :)


    9. What is the iconic shot of the film? What single frame of animation do you find to be the most memorable and why? Post it! You can check out this link to find some great screencaps to help!
    I guess Scrooge McDuck diving in treasure is quite iconic so I choose this one:
    [​IMG]



    10. What single pin do you think best represents this film for you? Why? Give us the pin number and post a picture!
    PinPics doesn’t have a lot of pins especially fr this movie so if only movie ones count I choose this one:
    Pin 60100 DuckTales the Movie
    https://www.pinpics.com/pinMT.php?pin=60100&keyw=treasure+of+the+lost+lamp
    If general Ducktales pins are allowed, too, then I’ll go with this one, it has many of the important characters:
    Pin 75395 DEC - Duck Tales pin
    [​IMG]

    Stray thoughts:

    I think Dagobert is a quite common translation of the name Scrooge McDuck – Hungarian is just one besides German and others. :)

    When Webby wished for all her dolls to come a live, the one in her hand didn’t become alive. Does that mean that that doll doesn’t belong to her?
     
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  22. unibear

    unibear DPF Charter Member DPF Charter Member

    Rating - 100%
    51   0   0

    I used to love the “Duck Tales” show when it came out, but never knew about this film. After seeing it, now I know why…

    1. My overall impression of the movie… Several things:

    I found the whole thing kind of boring. It seemed to drag on and focus on pointless things. I wonder if this would have been better served as a 30-minute TV episode instead of 75-minute feature movie.

    I just couldn’t get into the “suspension of belief” mode for this movie, and a couple of things at the beginning of the film really bothered me.
    • Too many cliché characters: (1) Launchpad as the quintessential goofball klutz hero—destroying an archeological ruin in the most spectacular way, tripping booby traps, tripping on the pyramid tip, etc. (2) Dijon as the typical weasely villain sidekick afraid of just about everything—being in the hot desert, entering the pyramid, jumping into Scrooge’s arms like a scaredy cat, etc..
    • So they trip on the tip of the pyramid and, with only four shovels being used by Dijon and the three nephews, manage to dig out a pyramid several hundreds of feet tall. NOT!
    • Gold is a VERY dense metal (d = 19.3 g/cm3), so there’s NO WAY Dijon could carry a huge sack full of gold objects (with precious gems as well) on a rickety wood and rope bridge!
    • When escaping from the pyramid, the “turtle shell” used to protect them from the scorpions was easily breeched by a scorpion claw coming after Launchpad. Yet, a few seconds later they were able to invert it and use it as a boat (with no hole in it). Just lazy writing/animating not to catch this issue…


    2. The character I chose to analyze was Scrooge McDuck, the quadzillionaire. I know he’s supposed to be the brave, adventurous hero of the movie, but I’m not buying it. He seems to be ruled by his avarice. I’ve always wondered if Scrooge McDuck (past “Mickey’s Christmas Carol”) is intended to provide social commentary on the really rich. It does seem like the uber-rich are totally in love with their $$ and power and are never satisfied with what they have, and Scrooge is no exception. He also reminds me of our president, who has way more $$ than he NEEDS but not nearly as much as he WANTS.

    When one his nephews asks why we wanted the treasure, his answer seemed to be more about the chase and the adventure (which was refreshing from such a greedy character, almost noble?) but then they ruined it (but kept him in character) by noting that he didn’t need the $$ but wanted the tax break. UGH! I know I shouldn’t want a socially redeeming ultra-rich character, but I guess I still do…


    7. This movie isn’t one of Disney’s high-powered releases or part of the Renaissance, (in my mind at least); it’s more part of the straight-to-video crowd. As such, its major goal is a bit of fun and entertainment for the masses. It might work for the younger kids who got hooked on the TV series, but it really didn’t do much for me…


    8. It’s interesting to compare this to the upcoming “Aladdin” movie, which also deals with Genies and lamps, but was a more high-end, high-budget version.
    • Aladdin’s Genie seems to be all-knowing and uses cultural references from modern day. Duck Genie didn’t seem to know what time he was in, and had to read encyclopedias to get caught up.
    • Duck Genie seemed to be a more low-profile, and was always trying to keep his magic and the consequences of the wishes a secret (mostly to hide from Murlock).
    • The addition of a magical talisman that allows for unlimited wishes was kind of cool, and ultimately made the Duck Genie/Lamp a bigger threat (in the past, after your three wishes you weren’t really a threat anymore…).
    • Interestingly enough, both stories ended the same way—wishing the Genie free. It really is the only way to neutralize the threat of someone else having a Genie and coming after you, after all.


    9. I chose this scene because it illustrates just how ludicrous/poorly written the story is. Remember, this pyramid was dug out by three adolescent ducks and a sniveling villain sidekick with hand-held shovels!
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]


    10. I know this pin (92574) is for the TV series and not the movie, but it seems to capture the adventure of Scrooge McDuck and his three nephews.
    [​IMG]
     
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  23. Meritre

    Meritre Active Member

    Rating - 100%
    2   0   0

    I was bothered by this one, too, but after I rewatched a scene I think I saw them stuff their beckpacks in the hole so it's usable in the first place :)

    I they are thos good, my garden will be a piece of cake for them! I'm too lazy to do it myself so I'll let them do the hard work :)

    I regard it as an experiment, how elemnts form Aladdin will work - that's what was the most significant for me with this movie, the possible help it provided to make Aladdin (another one of my big favorites:) )


    I almost choose that one but decieded that it was more the series than the movie :)
     
    Last edited: Jul 8, 2018
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  24. MerlinEmrys

    MerlinEmrys Hicitus Pinicus!

    Rating - 100%
    428   0   0

    1. Overall Impression
    Even more than The Little Mermaid, I’ve always considered this film the height of the Disney Renaissance. In terms of both storytelling and overall aesthetic, this one hit it right on the nose. While there may be a few inconsistencies of detail (Adam’s portrait, how does no one know about the castle, etc.), I have a hard time finding something wrong with the film. The use of CGI is tasteful and leagues beyond what we saw in Rescuers Down Under and certainly was used more as an enhancement rather than a cut corner. Small details like seeing Lumiere’s reflection in the top of the piano, to Belle always having to brush a stray hair out of her face, made this film feel both realistic and immersive. Overall, I was incredibly impressed—as I always am when I come to this one.

    And besides, who doesn’t love Cogsworth!?!? He alone makes this film impeccable ;P


    2. Character Analysis
    Though I said there wasn’t much wrong with the film, there are still aspects I don’t like. Gaston being the major one. He’s an excellent villain—perhaps too good at being bad. I find nothing redeemable about him and, in all honestly, he quite disgusts me. While he plays an excellent foil to Belle’s refinement, his boorish, sexist, predatory attitude was maybe too realistic for me to really find any common ground in. He jokes about books are fine, and his narcissism (stopping his proposal to look in the mirror) is a solid gag. But when he actually goes “on the hunt” I get really uncomfortable.

    His proposal scene is especially unsettling. He is a pure predatory, working Belle into a corner and just waiting to pounce. His body language as he moves around the room is one of pure power. And when Belle backs away to the door, he pushes furniture over and has this wild animal vibe—he’s doing everything but licking his chops!

    [​IMG] [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    That’s just a little too much for me. I get that it’s part of his character and appeal, but man it just creeps me out…


    3. Scene Analysis
    The scene where Beast attacks the wolves has always stuck out to as particularly intense. The music, of course, does a lot of the heavy lifting, but the lighting has a big impact as well!

    [​IMG] [​IMG]

    With the light coming up from the ground, it casts this incredible, dramatic shadow on Belle. It heightens the terror of whatever she’s looking at (the wolves) and cranks the tension of the scene up a lot. What’s strange though is…where’s that light coming from? Hahah! There’s no torch or lantern, and presumably the moon is above. Are the wolves glowing? Part of that whole curse thing? Who knows. But regardless, this scene is freaking intense…

    [​IMG]

    I mean…holy crap. Even I peed a little…


    5. Symbol Analysis
    The stained glass windows has always been my favorite motif from this film. And having seen it again, I think it’s because of the immersive effect it has on the story itself. The film opens with a voice over narration (voiced also by Cogsworth) telling the audience a story, and using the windows as, essentially, pages in a book. The visuals are incredible, and the amount of detail and form associate with each frame of the window is just breathtaking. But it doubles as not just a pretty aesthetic, but conveys the theme of storytelling which runs throughout the film (Belle and her books, reading a “Prince Charming” narrative at the beginning).


    6. Dialog Analysis
    I’ve always kind of lovingly rolled my eyes at Lumiere and his stereotypical French smarm. But one of his lines caught me off guard on this watch. Shortly after Belle is taken into the castle, he and Mrs. Potts are discussing with the Beast how this girl could be the one! Lumiere seems to think that it’ll be a quick and easy affair:

    “You fall in love with her; she falls in love with you, and poof the spell is broken! We’ll be human again by midnight!”

    Of course, Mrs. Potts explains that true love doesn’t happen that quickly. But for Lumiere, his idea of love is all fleeting and quick trysts in the curtains. His romancing of the coy Babette is evidence of this. It was sort of a throwaway line, but it reveals and reinforced a surprising amount of Lumiere’s character.


    9. Iconic Shot
    It’s got to be the ballroom scene, right? Well, since that’s so obvious, I’ll choose the scene that I always think of with this film:

    [​IMG]

    This is probably my favorite visual of the film. And along with the line “and the old woman’s ugliness melted away” just sends chills down my spine. It sets the whole tone and theme of “appearances” that permeates the film and is a stunning shot to boot.


    10. Representative Pin
    There’s no way I’m going through all of the pinpics listings for this. XD so here’s one that comes to mind that represents the film for me:

    [​IMG]
    Pin 28369 WDW - This Is Love: Crown Our Hearts with Love Set (Beggar Woman)

    Again, not only do we have the stained glass motif, but also the “appearances” theme and the wonderfully unassuming Beggar Woman. What a cool moment…


    Stray Thoughts:
    [​IMG]
    Best. Line. Ever.


    [​IMG]
    Second. Best. Line. Ever.
     
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  25. MerlinEmrys

    MerlinEmrys Hicitus Pinicus!

    Rating - 100%
    428   0   0

    1. Overall Impression
    I’ve always loved this movie, hahah! Is that such a surprise? ;P And while this one doesn’t exactly hold up in terms of artistry to the other films of this period, it’s certainly fun and has a solid (if obvious) message. It definitely feels like a TV movie, which is fine because that’s exactly what it wanted to be. I was smiling a lot, and it was great to hear Alan Young again as Scrooge (not that David Tenant isn’t amazing). So this was definitely a “fun” movie.


    2. Character Analysis / 6. Dialog Analysis
    But even with the rather simple delivery of its message, the movie managed to sneak in some interesting concepts and character elements, most notably in Gene the Genie of the Lamp. Something must have just been in the water, because Gene is definitely a precursor to Aladdin’s Genie in his zany, fast talking qualities. But something that’s a little different is Gene’s guilt and self-consciousness about his power and what could happen if the wrong person got a hold of him.

    He adamantly pleads with the kids “PLEASE make small wishes!” which stands in contrast to Genie’s over-the-top tilt. I thought this was a really neat concept, and couple that with Gene’s guilt, you suddenly have a very compelling, nuanced character standing in the shoes of a very well-worn trope. Moreover, when he really gets upset about the magnitude of wishes, we get a bit of his backstory in a quick breath:

    “Soon they’ll all be fighting over me, then the wishes will get out of control, and I’ll get stuck back in the lamp for another thousand years!”

    The idea that people would fight over that power is obvious, but not something I had considered. And that Gene is self-aware enough to know he is the object of many desires and the potential cause for a lot of pain and harm to others makes his a really weighted character. When the lamp dissolves at the end, it was as if his concerns and guilt dissolved as well.

    For being such a low-key movie, Gene was surprisingly fleshed out.


    3. Scene Analysis
    So this may be a bit of a cheat, since this is honestly more of a repeat Character/Dialog analysis, but whatever! It’s still part of a scene XD When Scrooge and Gene are trying to escape Merlock in the gala, Gene begs Scrooge to wish them home, and we get this fun exchange:

    “Not a chance! These wishes are worth a fortune!”
    “What’s more important: a fortune or your life?”
    “Well….”
    “Hey! It’s not exactly a trick question!”

    We get a lot of Scrooge’s character here, of course it’s compounded by one’s assumed familiarity with the TV show, but that moment of hesitation is so patently Scrooge it was delightful. Scrooge is highly flawed, but almost always ends up making the right decision in the end. When he and Gene are falling and Scrooge makes his wish, the order of importance is clear:

    “I wish for me, and the family, and the bin to be back in Duckburg”

    The bin is last, behind the family, but stiiiiiiill definitely included. Hahah! Again, a subtle yet character-driven decision for the writers.


    8. Connections
    I know this may be an unpopular opinion, but I love the new DuckTales in that we get individual personalities for all of the nephews. Watching this again for the first time in years just made me realize that they’re basically just one character. Unlike Chip and Dale, who are a package deal, the nephews are indiscernible from each other beyond the most minute, situational differences. They even all sound the exact same! (And voiced by the same person, obviously). So this viewing made me appreciate the new DuckTales that much more.


    9. Iconic Shot
    This one was sort of hard to choose, since nothing really stood out as iconic. But I suppose Scrooge diving into the Kali-Baba treasure is pretty much what I think of for this film:

    [​IMG]


    10. Representative Pin
    Another hard call since there aren’t actually any pins from the movie. So I’ll go with the Disney Afternoon Logo pin, since we get the adventuring vibe pretty strongly from it:

    [​IMG]
    Pin 92574 Disney Afternoon Mystery Set – DuckTales Logo



    Stray Thoughts:
    *”Most of this will go to museums.” “That doesn’t sound like Uncle Scrooge…” “That way I can enjoy a hefty tax break!” “That does!”

    Pfffffft. Solid gold. xD
     
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