The Disney 52 Animated Challenge: Year-Long Activity - NOW PLAYING: Princess and the Frog

Discussion in 'DPF Game Room' started by MerlinEmrys, Dec 15, 2017.

  1. timeerkat

    timeerkat Your Friend Who Likes To Play

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    1. Despite the issues people have brought up already (gender, Westernization/whitewashing, etc.) Mulan is one of my favorite "Princess" movies. Her personal conflict is very relatable to me (who doesn't question who they actually are, and what their purpose in life is?) and I love that she values family so highly. While it does ultimately end up as a love story, that is really only in the last few minutes of the film. Overall Mulan's interest in Shang seems more in impressing him with her talent rather than seeing him as a love interest.

    The music ranges in the movie from very memorable (I'll Make A Man Out Of You, though this is partly because of the visual montage) to only slightly memorable (A Girl Worth Fighting For). Of note, there is no love song in this film.

    And let's take the time to appreciate that Mulan not only has both parents survive through the entire movie, but it shows one as disabled! Disability is such a rare thing in animated movies.


    2. Shan Yu is middle of the road for me in terms of villains. There are much less effective villains in the Disney canon (looking at you, Ratcliffe), but there are also much more frightening and, yes, villainous characters out there. He seems more one-note and flat character development-wise than many of the villains that have come before him.

    Most of his villainous acts take place off camera. We hear from the soldiers what he's done, and we come across the destruction left in his wake, but we don't really ever SEE him doing most these things.

    What stood out to me, though, is how animalistic his character design was. They gave him claws instead of fingernails, fangs instead of teeth, and black eyes with yellow pupils. His outfit is mainly comprised of animal pelts. His voice has a growling nature to it, and even his sidekick is an animal. This reflects his personality, almost as if to say a human wouldn't be capable of the atrocities he committed. Only an animal would burn villages to the ground and slaughter children (and delight in doing so). This giving animalistic qualities to a person (when often it was the other way around with anthropomorphizing an animal villain) served to disconnect the audience from him - we shouldn't want to sympathise or find things in common with him.

    (I do feel for him with his death, though. That was a BRUTAL way to go. Having a rocket crash into you and drag you into a tower full of exploding fireworks has got to hurt!)

    5. Thee symbol that stood out to me most was dragons.

    Dragons (specifically Chinese dragons) symbolize power and strength, which Mulan demonstrates - she gains physical power and strength through her training, but she also has great inner strength to take her father's place and place herself in danger to save him. They are also known to bring prosperity in the form of rain to parched lands. While she doesn't literally do this, she does almost single-handedly defeat the entire Hun army, which will theoretically lead to more prosperous times for those who lived in constant fear of the Huns.

    I read online awhile ago a theory that the reason Mushu was unable to wake the Great Stone Dragon is because Mulan is actually the spirit of the Great Stone Dragon, so there was nothing left in the statue to awaken. Watching through the movie with that in mind, I can see where this theory has some merit.

    The majority of dragon imagery throughout the movie is directly tied to Mulan (ESPECIALLY during the scene where she takes her father's place). Not just the fact that her guide, Mushu, is a dragon, or that there is a dragon on her sword hilt.

    [​IMG]

    (Pictured: a dragon directly over Mulan as she sees her reflection in the sword.)

    She comes to the decision to take her father's place while sitting at the base of the Great Stone Dragon. When she goes to pray to her ancestors before leaving, she places the lit match into a hanging metal dragon (and all of the shots in this mini scene are from above, with the dragon watching over her as she prays).

    [​IMG]

    The shots continually flash between her and the Great Stone Dragon. She parts the dragon-shaped handles of the door to get access to the armor.

    [​IMG]

    And the medallion of the Emperor, which he gives her to as a tangible signs of her honor, features a dragon. This is particularly interesting as most of the animal symbolism around the palace appeared to be lions rather than dragons.

    [​IMG]


    9.
    [​IMG]


    This is my iconic shot. It is reminiscent of the half-makeup shot (I was waffling between using that and this), but this shot shows more of her strength, bravery, and resolve than the other shot does. She knows the danger behind her decision, but saving her father by taking his place is more important to her than anything in this moment. The mirroring ("reflection" if you will) of the half-makeup shot means that she is starting to understand who she actually is as a person.

    It also shows the respect Mulan has for family traditions, as she is going through the same ritualistic movements that her father went through while he was taking out the armor.


    10. There are several pins or pin sets based on Reflection, and have Mulan shown in both matchmaker and Ping outfits. But this one I think is my favorite, because it LITERALLY shows who Mulan is inside. It's a hinged pin with Matchmaker Mulan on the outside and Ping on the inside, and is designed in such a way that you can open one flap and (kind of) recreate the shot with Mulan in half makeup, or open them both to reveal the true warrior inside.
    [​IMG]
    Pin# 24494 - WDW - Journey Through Time Pin Event 2003 (Mulan) Artist Choice

    Honorable mention to this. It's not the best representative pin, but I am IN LOVE with this pin. (Even though it doesn't make total sense since one of the first outfits Mulan wears is pink!) Pink has always been my least favorite color and hated wearing it until very recently, and even now there has to be a very specific reason for my outfit to be pink - like when I Bing Bong bound.

    [​IMG]

    Pin# 96853 - Mulan - 'Not All Girls Wear Pink'


    Random Thoughts

    ~ Mushu's line about corn chip smell really bothered me. I sat there for a few minutes going "Were "corn chips" even invented by then? I know tortillas have been around forever but do they count as "corn chips?" Did they even HAVE corn in China back then?" The same goes for the blue plastic toothbrush and tube of toothpaste Mushu pulls out. Normally I can forgive anachronisms, but these two just stuck out in the wrong way.

    ~Why in the name of all that is holy did they hire BD Wong to play the voice of Li Shang and then have SOMEONE ELSE do the singing? I mean, Donny Osmond did a great job with it, but THEY ALREADY HAD BD FREAKING WONG!!!!!!

    ~ Crossing Jordan is one of my favorite older TV shows, but ever since I pieced together that Dr. Macy and Shan Yu were the same actor, half the time when I watch a scene with Miguel Ferrer in it, I just picture Shan Yu in his place.

    ~ HOLY GLOB why did I never put together that the Matchmaker was played by my very own head of house, Professor Sprout? :O

    ~ Wait, wait, wait...SO, they *didn't* have time to break the door down with the battering ram to save the Emperor, but they *did* have enough time for the guys to get into full dresses *and* makeup? (Where did they even GET the dresses and makeup? Especially ones in Chien Po's and Yao's sizes?) *strongly sideeyes*

    ~ SHORTEST LIFE DEBT REPAYMENT EVER.

    ~ While some of the lyrics are problematic ("Did they send me daughters when I asked for sons?" for one), I'll Make A Man Out Of You is hands down one of my favorite montage scenes of all time.
     
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  2. Meritre

    Meritre Active Member

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    I'm thinking about the dragon at the victory celebration in which the Hunns were hiding - could it beeing torn apart mean that nobody believes her or that her disguise was found out - because of the Hunns?
    Also, the cannons had also a dragon head as a decoration - and Mulan started that avalanceh with the last one. :)

    Mushu knew already that this is going to be his job :D

    I wondered about that, too. I assume Mulan found some place where all those clothes were stored and that's when she got the idea?

    Interesting theory, I never heard that one.
     
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  3. pincrazy

    pincrazy Active Member

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    I haven't watched this in quite awhile, and it's interesting how time influences a viewpoint.
    1) Overview-I found the movie filled with a lot of comic relief in one way or another, but excuse it in trying to entertain a general population. It's another Disneyfied version of a cultural tale, as has been seen in prior movies. The negatives is it's Americanization but in order for it to be understood, liberties are taken and reinterpreted. Positives are it showed a girl can have identity and respect, and a Disney character for Asian girls to identify with. I'm Japanese-American but there are many similarities shared, and at the time, I was happy for my daughter to see Disney represent an Asian character, female, strong, and independent. Culturally to empower a female to stand up for the family name, which is what the father/male represents, it's a sentiment not usually seen, or at times accepted. In our culture we don't want to bring Shame to the family, it's how society keeps each other in check and not an individual option.
    Overall Mulan was not as I had remembered, noticing the problems with it socially and culturally. It's not a classic in terms of being timeless or historical, but it fulfills Disney's family film status.
    2) Mulan is easy to relate to, she's not a complicated character. In the movie she's an only child, and a female that doesn't embrace the typical goal of what that brings. Although she knows it's wrong, she stands in to fight for family, country, and honor.... this doesn't sound just Chinese, and maybe that's why the story is relatable. In every culture is the girl/female that goes against the odds to challenge and/or correct the wrong, go beyond the distance, achieve/make a difference, or do what's needed. Mulan, showed girls to think outside the box, she was the one that climbed the pole to get the arrow, use the last cannon to create an avalanche, get access in the palace to save the Emperor, and lure Shan Yu to light up the sky!
    4) Reflections is beautifully written, the words set up the anquish many girls feel growing up, trying to figure out their path with family expectations, and learn/accept/love themselves. Until you're confident with yourself it's hard to accept the person you see in the reflection.
    5) The symbol I found interesting was the importance of cutting her hair. It seems in many cultures females should have long hair, a sign of femininity. For her to cut it meant she was going against family, status, respect, honor, and identity.....meaning she was willing to sacrifice what she knew as family for family. Sounds confusing.....? Anyway
    I remember growing up and having long hair, because my grandfather felt it represented beauty, ohimesamas had long hair. : p
    10) Pin #94861 depicts Mulan and Li Shang on horses, and her 3 friends Ling, Yao, Chien Po on foot ready for battle

    These are my 5 for the week. Can't wait to start reading everyone's analysis. :stitch: till next week TTFN
     
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  4. Meritre

    Meritre Active Member

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    I didn't have anything better to do yesterday than devote my time to my translating and Mulan craze. This is the result I hope it is interesting for at least some of you. I've been fighting to upload it to photobucket but it refused. I daresay it sounds odd, but I tried to stick as close to the surce as possible - and there are lots off differences between the languages and cultures. It has a very different effect, I think.
    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Aug 27, 2018
  5. pincrazy

    pincrazy Active Member

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    Just thought I'd add this before Mulan gets cutoff-
    Back in the day, any notable family would arrange the marriage of their children. Marriage was a family obligation to keep the lineage reputable, strong, and of course growing Love is a Western and Christian emotion for marriage.
    Basically the parents would have someone in mind or enlist the help of a matchmaker, who's main job was to arrange an impressive match. In our culture, not currently, the match had to also be within the same class and economics. They would even do a background check of the family, going back generations.
    The matchmaker was like an agent to make sure you looked, acted, dressed, had proper etiquette, knew the arts, caligraphy, ikebana, etc. something she had to guarantee the grooms family. A prosperous, reputable, and intelligent male for the bride's family.
    If the match is agreed to, than its bragging rights for all.
    In Mulan, it seemed Disney wanted to show the difference in culture, and her conflict in her expectancy of family obligation. She didn't want to embarass her family,, but she knew in her failure of not pleasing the matchmaker her chances of getting a good match was gone, not to mention the gossip in the town. Her decision to go in her father's place is a need to do the right thing for her father, her family, and herself. It's her way of protecting the family name, because she won't be able to do it with a good marriage.
    This was how I interpreted the scenes, and maybe I'm putting too much thought into it, but a stronger reason for her decision. :)
     
  6. Meritre

    Meritre Active Member

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    I've read that in China arrangning marriages were not rarely done when the future couple was only a pair of small children. It helped if some familymembers, usually the heads of the families, were friends.

    @pincrazy I cant find it here but I had it sent out to my mailbox as an alert so here is the answer :) : I think the translation for Mulan is pretty good but that's my subjective opinion. I love the translations done during the ninties and early 2000's. But later that was the very reason I stopped watching the movies in hungarian, I didn't like the translations and the voice acting was not up to earlier standards, either.
     
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  7. Addicted to Alice Pins

    Addicted to Alice Pins My name is Ann, and I'm here to enable you!

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    I finally had a chance to read through this. It's sooooooo interesting. The "Hun dub" really got right to the heart of the matter, whereas the English version is very Disney and makes its somewhat repugnant point in a jolly sing-song way. You know there is irony in the English version (we're supposed to sympathize with Mulan when we hear about the prepping and pulling and frivolity of a woman's place and the expectation for her as a bride) but the translation is so direct about the whole thing: A woman should be silent; her role is to bear sons (which @Meritre had already pointed out in her analysis). Ouch. Again, that attitude isn't surprising in the context of the movie (and remains relevant with the ongoing issue of respect for women) ... but the Hungarian version is more of a slap in the face than a tweak of the cheek, so to speak! Thanks for sharing this!!! (Side note: I do love that they bypassed the silk purse part and just went with "rub a dub dub, get in the tub. :D )
     
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  8. coblj003

    coblj003 DPF Charter Member DPF Correspondent

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    So here we are on Monday and it looks like only a few have commented, a bit late but I'm here. I will update with pics when I get home.

    1. What is your overall impression of the film? Some possible talking points include: what you did or did not like about it; what about the film has stuck with you; what did you find different on this viewing; how would modern audiences respond to this (for the older films)… The list goes on. Hahah!

    I watched this with my daughters and they seemed to enjoy this movie. I thought that as a 90's movie it definitely holds up, one of the aspects that Disney was experimenting with was trying to move away from the "Damsel in distress" and providing a strong female lead. In other regards, it's criticism that Disney essentially culturally appropriated Chinese culture seemed warrented; One criticism being that the story of Mulan and the character herself was portrayed as very American vs Chinese. It kinda goes with how they were promoting it as having a strong "Asian"cast, without actually saying no major cast member was from mainland China(Mulan herself is from Macau). This actually reminds me a bit of its similarity of the Memoirs of the Geisha casting, whose cast was heavily criticized for being Chinese over Japanese. It does look like Disney plans on fixing this for it's live action treatment.

    The art direction actually is quite interesting in that it seems to borrow from Chinese brush painting; you can see this clearly in the intro/girl worth fighting for sequence but also in smaller details such around the plumes of smoke throughout that mimic brush strokes. The soundtrack is quite vibrant and memorable, which is usually featured on any recent Disney playlist; If I have to criticize the score, it would be that it it seems to copy Chinese music scales and built around that.

    One aspect that everyone seems to question is why is she considered a Disney "Princess"? It depend heavily on interpretation of the social hierarchy of Imperial China as the lower nobility, civil servants, and Military share a similar if not the same social standing; if she marries Li Shang was from exceptional military background(the historical General Li Shang from the Han Dynasty was actually granted the equivalent nobility title of Marquis) she gains this, but it is ultimately implied that Mulan would be granted a similar nobility stance for her family as being the favored hero of China.


    4. Choose one song to analyze—tell me what response is it trying to evoke from the viewer and how does it go about getting that response? What purpose does this song have in the film and does it succeed in that purpose?

    This seems kinda like a playful, let's garner an "awkward fish out of water"response of the heroine, type of song. Like much of the film before, Ping is clearly out of her element in how to respond. As it takes place as a March, it has that backbone of a military song(for some reasons, Halls of montezuma comes to mind).

    3. Choose one specific scene or sequence to analyze—tell me what response is it trying to evoke from the viewer and how does it go about getting that response? Your analysis could include the scene’s use of color, action, camera angles, music, character development, setting, backdrop, style, etc. If you can justify it with evidence from the scene, then it’s an analysis!
    The moment that that the playful of the previous song comes to a halt, you are thrust from a lush white wonderland with a blue sky, to the burnt remnants of a town with a bright red backdrop. The snow actually comes into play as while it marks the color of innocence in our culture, it can actually mean color of death in Chinese culture. This film also brings into play a a first in a Disney animated film as it gives us the stark and haunting portrayal of a battleground.

    5. Choose one specific symbol in the film to analyze. A symbol is typically something inanimate, an object, rather than a character. So don’t say “Brer Bear represents dumb people,” as that’s more of a character analysis than a symbol. Rather, think about specific objects (jewelry, clothing, houses, food, weapons, etc.) What does this symbol mean and how does that meaning impact the film?

    And here we have the Disney moment of this film. The Doll in the village, which represents little girl killed in the siege, conveys Mulan silent refrain from the previous song, the girl worth fighting for...

    8. What connections or progressions do you see in this film to past films? Example: how does Sleeping Beauty progress (or digress?) the princess archetype built in Cinderella? Be specific! Also, consider what use there is in returning to or re-imagining those elements?

    All hail Emperor Yensid, this shot actually mimics his stance as he confronts the arguing Chi Fu and Li Shang. Ironically it is also a type of western iconography of Moses parting the Red Sea.

    9. What is the iconic shot of the film? What single frame of animation do you find to be the most memorable and why? Post it! You can check out this link to find some great screencaps to help!


    I find this sword stance to be one of my favorite shots. It's pretty much a kung fu maneuver, she clearly isn't the strongest but is sly enough to be able to disarm her opponent's weapon and rather then use it against him with brute force pins his cloak down before he gets overtaken by fireworks. Ironically it reminds me a bit of the live action Street Fighter, in which Chun Li(also performed by Ming Na) catches her opponent M. Bison off guard by breaking her Hand Cuffs and proceeding to fight him to an almost near defeat.

    10. What single pin do you think best represents this film for you? Why? Give us the pin number and post a picture!


    Pin 16668 Magical Musical Moments - Reflection (Spinner)

    There aren't actually a lot of Mulan pins out there(at least compared to the other princesses), Especially those with both Mulan/Ping.
     
  9. NutMeg

    NutMeg The Nefarious N.M.G.

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    @timeerkat - I came looking for your Hercules analysis you mentioned but saw that you just analyzed Mulan too and I got completely sidetracked, THANKS lol now I've procrastinated on like 50 different things because I had to reply to you... which is obviously your fault... not mine.....

    A long time ago someone casually mentioned to me that idea of Mulan having awakened the Great Stone Dragon herself, and even though we didn't actually discuss the theory, it stuck with me. And I've kept returning to the idea whenever I've re-watched the film since. It's one of the more fascinating fan theories imo. I don't believe the filmmakers have ever made any comment one way or the other (I should really listen to the DVD commentary and see if I can suss out what the directors were thinking.) But I enjoy this interpretation a whole lot, and tbh it's pretty much become canon for me on a personal level, haha. As you keenly observed, the visual motif of dragons throughout the film is by far most poignant in her "transformation" scene. The dragon that sticks out most to me is the one on the stone tablet in the center of the ancestors' temple; Mulan stands and faces it as she prays. Like you said, this moment is filmed primarily from above - the only eye level angle is a wide shot wherein the tablet is obscured by her body.

    [​IMG]

    After she runs off, we cut to this towering, low-angle shot of the tablet in question, and its "face" is finally revealed to be that of a dragon.

    [​IMG]

    This feels like a fairly important moment, because it's actually the *very first time* in the film that this dragon - the visual focal point of the whole temple - is revealed to the audience. I had to briefly peruse the screencaps gallery to double check, but yeah - this is the grand unveiling, so to speak. The dragon *does* have two blink-and-you'll-miss-it cameos prior to this, but in both shots, its face is hazy and indistinct; I mean, it doesn't even look like a face, just some sort of vague carving. In each of these two separate shots - when Fa Zhou kneels to pray at the beginning, and when Mulan kneels while singing "Reflection" - the dragon is in the darkened background, near the outskirts of the frame (away from where the eye is naturally drawn), is fuzzy and out of focus, and lacking any detail or crisp line work.

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    So even though we don't know about the power of "The Great Stone Dragon" yet (I think? I haven't watched the movie in a while), this particular dragon's sudden reveal - the fact that he was present in the temple all along - feels vaguely significant.

    Moments later, as Mulan rides off, the dragon's eyes abruptly spark to life, as if "awakened." What's more, the grandmother suddenly awakens as well. She's basically the mystical, eccentric "village crazy lady" granny archetype that Disney loves, in the vein of Gramma Tala and Grandmother Willow. So by Disney logic, it makes sense for her to be more "spiritually attuned" to something happening in the ancestral realm. (Which is echoed in the fluidity of the framing: both her eyes and the dragon's eyes are positioned in the same exact spot.)

    [​IMG]

    I suppose it's not a perfect metaphor, since the "real" Great Stone Dragon (or the personified one, at least) seems to be the statue outside... However, I personally suspect that this "plot hole" (although I wouldn't call it that myself) could just be a case of the filmmakers writing themselves into a corner. Mushu simply MUST attempt to awaken the Dragon *outside* the temple, so that when he inevitably fails and decides to adopt his whole ruse, the ancestors are far enough away to be fooled (at least theoretically, lol. I wouldn't say Mushu's impression was suuuper convincing haha, but hey, that's the joke.) However, at the same time, you probably want the scene of Mulan praying to/*actually* awakening the Dragon to happen *inside* the temple, because A) it's obviously more visually striking than shooting it out in the dark, dismal rain; B) since this sequence is entirely non-verbal, the temple setting provides visual shorthand to quickly convey that she's having a spiritual moment - again, standing out in the rain probably wouldn't communicate prayer as effectively; and C) it carries much more symbolic weight to have this moment occur on the sacred ground of her family. It also provides, imo, this really subtle, beautiful mirroring of the earlier scene in which Fa Zhou prays for Mulan. In *her* prayer scene, I feel like there's a sense of the roles being reversed - because while I do assume she throws in a request for her own protection, my guess would be that her prayer is mostly a plea for the health and safety of her father... I feel like this is even visually suggested by the transition between the aforementioned "reveal" shot of the Stone Dragon, and the shot of the dragon on the screen in Fa Zhou's bedroom. So there's a pretty literal connection there between her prayer and her father.

    [​IMG]

    So yeah, I think perhaps the filmmakers just ended up with a slight conflict between the differing demands of plot logistics and symbolism, and weren't entirely successful in resolving that - or rather, manifesting it in a visually cohesive way. Thus we end up with two separate, seemingly contradictory visual representations of the Great Stone Dragon. But anyway, I still find this interpretation super intriguing and personally I think it's valid. Thanks for bringing it up!

    THANK YOU. I adore BD Wong. I did read once, however, that Donny Osmond wanted to play Hercules, but bombed so badly in his audition that he seriously considered quitting music altogether. So maybe Disney was feeling guilty and decided to throw him a bone? Haha.

    Unpopular opinion, but I actually really like that line, haha. I guess because I consider it so tongue-in-cheek? I mean, the whole scene - so much of the film itself, in fact - is steeped in irony. Because Mulan is our POV character and we, the audience, are "in" on her secret. So a lot of the face-value misogyny is inherently undermined by our personal knowledge that she actually breaks all these stereotypes and prejudices they're espousing - at least that's my personal reaction. When Shang is all, "Did they send me daughters??" I'm over here like, uhhhh yeah they did send you one, and she's gonna save all your butts and make you eat those words, mister.

    I also think the lyrics are really interesting in their definitions of masculinity. They're all physical traits, such as being swift, forceful, and strong (and mysterious, for some reason - I guess because dudes are supposed to be stone-faced and never admit that they, you know, feel stuff...?) All the skills being taught involve decidedly violent activities such as combat, weaponry, explosives, bashing your freakin' face into a cinder block (as one often does in wartime, naturally...) And all the imagery evoked in the lyrics is rather violent as well (typhoons, raging fires, etc.) Not only does Mulan fail to meet these standards of toxic masculinity, but *the men themselves* fail to meet them as well. Because Shang's/society's expectations of what it takes to "be a man" are pretty much just as ridiculous as what is demanded of women. So imo, it's not only that Shang is incredulous at the thought of daughters joining his ranks, he doesn't even think he got the sons - the supposed "real men" - that he asked for.

    The culmination of these gender politics in the training montage is pretty interesting... I think it's left sort of ambiguous whether Mulan's creative method for reaching the top of the pole (knotting the weights together) was actually the solution Shang was secretly looking for all along. Was it a logic problem to begin with, or did he actually expect the soldiers to "man up" and use brute strength? I've flip-flopped on this, but I think I kinda lean toward the latter. Shang says the weights represent "diligence" and "strength," descriptors that seem more aligned with the "macho man" culture he's trying to grind into them. Plus, it's right after they all fail this climbing challenge that he starts showing off his own athletic prowess and accusing them of being big 'ole sissies who need to toughen up and get #swole. And I mean, it just seems super freakin' counter-intuitive that his training would center entirely on physical strength if he had *really* wanted them to develop cleverness and ingenuity all along... Idk, there's a lot of stuff at play in this scene, and the subtext is ripe for debate (which I will preemptively opt out of lol), but I feel like reading the scene this way shifts the power dynamic more toward Mulan, which I dig.

    Anyway, I didn't watch the movie or do an analysis, just recalling this stuff from memory; it's been a while since my last viewing, so I may be giving the film more feminist kudos than it deserves haha. I can totally see how it could be problematic as you say. Definitely gonna have to pop it in soon and take off them nostalgia goggles...
     
    Last edited: Aug 28, 2018
  10. Meritre

    Meritre Active Member

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    I just had this idea now, maybe the statue outside is just the body and the soul is in the temple in that carved dragon artwork?
    That was my reaction, too :)

    I think towards the end of the movie he somewhat realises that his way is not the only one and the other one is a good way, too. Well he starts to suspect it with the arrow and at the end he accepts thet Mulans ways are great. (He tells her so but that's not really what Mulan was expecting to hear from him)
    Also I would love to see what hee is doing and thinking when his soliders just run off to follow Mulan and support her idea. This could be a great moment for character development.

    Yes they wear white for mourning and red is considered the color of happiness - they dress their newborn babies into cheerful colors like red and green. :)
     
    Last edited: Aug 29, 2018
  11. MerlinEmrys

    MerlinEmrys Hicitus Pinicus!

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    Oh goodness… I’m so horrifically behind on everything… Sorry @LittleBird!! This one is gonna be quick >.<


    1. Overall Impression
    I love this movie to pieces. Perhaps too much, as in, I don’t like thinking about it critically because I just enjoy watching it. I noticed about half way through the film that I had stopped taking notes and would have to go back and fill in the gaps. But that’s not to say there isn’t awesome stuff to talk about in this movie. It just means that I prefer to let this one wash over me and just enjoy it. Hahah!


    2. Character Analysis
    The premise of the film has to set up the tension between letting a woman do something manly and telling a woman she can’t. That alone is like laying down bear traps yourself and then dashing back through the room. However, the film did a good job of making sure the characters that upheld that negative perspective were absolutely unlikable and unsympathetic. Namely Chi Fu. From his character design to his writing, everything about this guy just screams “weasel.” His underbite is unattractive up against Shang’s impressive jawline; he’s slimy and underhanded, threatening to essentially force-stop Shang’s troop just because he doesn’t think Shang deserves to be captain (“Oh, by the way, I got that job on my own…”); he’s so vehement about killing Mulan there’s almost no way anyone can feel sorry for him. All of the comedy built around the character is at his expense—whenever anything bad happens to him, we laugh. When his tent gets blown up, the panda eats his slipper, Yao’s sting about his mother, we all revel in taking him down a peg. Which makes us all the happier when he’s proven wrong at the story’s end. So really, the film never gave us a choice but to be against him, which is a clever way of avoiding all those bear traps!


    3. Scene Analysis
    During “Be a Man”, when Ping is being sent home, we get the shift in the song where he starts climbing the pole. It’s an obvious moment, yet we are cheering him on the same way Ling is in the audience. But what’s a nice spot is where Ping makes the last move up the pole and he breaks through the shadow and into the rising sunlight. Nice, uplifting, triumphant. It’s just a cool spot.

    [​IMG]

    5. Symbol Analysis
    I’ve always loved the doll from the razed village as a symbol for loss. But what’s also interesting is how the doll serves different purposes for different characters. For Ping, it’s a loss of innocence, for the first time he’s seeing what’s really at stake in this war. For the audience, it’s the loss of life of a child, specifically, which as a parent watching this film with their kid, that would be especially poignant. But for Shan Yu, it’s an opportunity for advantage—he and his men go all Sherlock on it and deduce all kinds of things that give them an edge. So it’s just interested that something so simple, which itself does not change, has so many different meanings.


    6. Dialog Analysis

    Not that it’s a surprise, but I love Mushu, hahah! He was a lot of fun in this, and though he was played for comedy most of the time, he had moments of depth. When Mulan is discovered and left in the mountains, the film moves into its final act and Mushu gets come character development! Sitting over his pathetic fire, he says, “You risked your life to help people you love. I risked your life to help myself. At least you had good intentions!” Despite its flippant delivery, that’s a major confession for this character! And while I wish there had been just a moment of tension between him and Mulan over this, I am satisfied in how it moves Mushu toward a more openly positive character.


    9. Iconic Shot

    Lots of good options for this one. And while I’m not normally a fan of the “Two-face” motif, Mulan wiping half the makeup off will always be my iconic shot for this film.

    [​IMG]

    Runner up:
    [​IMG]

    10. Representative Pin

    I assumed this would be a hard choice. But nope, as soon as I saw this pin, I knew that was it.

    [​IMG]
    Pin 61937 Mulan's 10th Anniversary - Fan with Tassel


    It’s got the different phases of Mulan, along with plenty of Chinese iconography to sell the style of the film. And of course, Hero of China Mulan is front and center! Absolutely perfect.
     
  12. timeerkat

    timeerkat Your Friend Who Likes To Play

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  13. timeerkat

    timeerkat Your Friend Who Likes To Play

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    Merlin hasn't announced Tarzan yet, but I'm in a time crunch so I need to post now. Gotta catch my ride to the airport in a few minutes!

    2. Kala is the connection between Tarzan and the other gorillas. She is the matriarch of the band, and one of her duties along with Kerchak is to keep the group safe from outsiders. However, she is able to see what he isn't - that not everything that is different is a threat. He is on high alert all the time, perhaps enhanced by the loss of their own baby. It is only through coming back to help and putting his own life on the line to try and save Kerchak that he is accepted as his son. However, Kala knew she needed to be Tarzan's mother the moment she found him. She was able to see that even though he was strange, he wasn't a threat and needed her help to survive. The group was still safe, and she was able to become a mother again after their tragedy.

    Also, how boss was she during her fight with Sabor? Lady gorilla can think quick on her feet! And I love the snarl she gives him after he gets tangled up in the rope. It's one final "Don't mess with me!" and a bit of revenge for what he did to her baby.)

    I also have to add that Glenn Close as Kala is one of my favorite voice acting performances throughout all of the Disney movies. She is firm when she needs to be but always has a gentleness to her voice that perfectly captures her character. I get *this* close to crying at her performance during the scene between her and Tarzan at the water, and I very rarely ever cry at movies.


    7. The goal is to teach us that even though we have differences, we are still the same where it counts. It also teaches us that family is what you make it to be, not who you are born to.

    (It also teaches us not to trust British men wielding shotguns in the jungle. ;) )

    8. This movie comes at the tail end of this generation of movies, but it is still linked to the rest of the 90's movies in that the main character feels like an outsider and wants to find out where he/she belongs in the world. Tarzan takes it a step further though - rather than just feeling different than those around him, Tarzan is literally a different species. He also comes to the conclusion that many of the other protagonists did, in that he learns to embrace his differences and fit in to the place he's always called home, and everyone else in his community learns to accept him as he is as well.

    9.
    [​IMG]

    This shot perfectly captures the theme of the movie - even though someone may look different than you, they are really the same on the inside. Kala teaches this to Tarzan by having him compare their heartbeats. It's such a small scene but it has tons of significance.

    10. Tarzan is woefully underrepresented pins-wise . I was hoping to find a pin of the shot above but I can't find anything from that whole scene, let alone that shot. So I went with a pin that utilizes something that Tarzan learned from the above scene, when he and Kala compared hands. He and Kala have different hands - similar, but different enough. However, when he compares his hands to Jane's, they match exactly, and he knows he's finally found one of his "own kind."

    There are several pins of this shot, but I chose this one specifically because it also has the book that the movie is based on.

    [​IMG]
    Pin# 122758 - WDI - Storybook Collection - A Treasury of Tales - Tarzan and Jane Only

    Random Thoughts

    ~ Geez, what is it with gruesome villain deaths? They were very careful to make his death his own doing - Tarzan threw the vines at him, but he was the one to cut all of the supporting vines away. But yeah....getting hanged in the jungle - and then cutting to a shot of his swinging shadow...that's pretty morbid.

    ~ I've seen this film about a dozen times, and this was the first time I can remember actually seeing the shot of Tarzan's dead parents. I don't know if I just didn't notice before now, or if I blocked it out of my memory for some reason, but it startled me a bit when I noticed that.
     
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  14. MerlinEmrys

    MerlinEmrys Hicitus Pinicus!

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    Ack! That's because I totally forgot to!!! BRB!

    Sent from my SM-G950U1 using Tapatalk
     
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  15. MerlinEmrys

    MerlinEmrys Hicitus Pinicus!

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    [​IMG]
    Tarzan (1999)

    Monday/Tuesday is our "wrap-up" discussion on Mulan. So you're welcome to respond to other analyses throughout the day.

    However, you may not post any more full analyses for Mulan to count for completion toward the 52 Challenge. No late homework. ;P

    ~Merlin
     
    Last edited: Sep 5, 2018
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  16. caw caw rawr

    caw caw rawr Squirrel!

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    Tarzan tidbit - I can't handle the first few minutes of the movie (Kala's baby being stolen) so up until this year my kids all thought that the movie started on the second track/chapter/whatever of the dvd. :p:D
     
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  17. unibear

    unibear DPF Charter Member DPF Charter Member

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    Well, along with “Mary Poppins” and “Lion King” this is the third movie that I have been dreading and putting off watching for as long as I can (18 years, to be exact). I had half-jokingly described LK as “Elton John’s Disney movie… with lions” but it’s no exaggeration to call this one “Phil Collin’s Disney movie… with gorillas”!


    1. and 4. My overall impression of the movie… Several things:

    As I mentioned above, this film is dominated (and ruined) by Phil Collins. The movie starts out with an introduction of two families: human and gorilla. But the spell of the movie was broken by a Phil Collins song. The song really pulled me out of the movie and I felt like I had been dropped into a 1980’s MTV video. Throughout the movie, EVERY SINGLE SONG is sung by Phil Collins, and each and every time, it broke the Disney magic of the film for me and made it all about Phil Collins. I counted FIVE of them (although one might have been a reprise of another).

    I don’t think I’ve ever truly HATED a Disney movie (I DON’T LIKE “Mary Poppins” and I guess I could stomach LK if I had to), but Phil Collins has made me hate this movie. For at least 2/3 of the movie… Once they stopped with the crappy Phil Collins songs and let the movie finally play out, I felt it was much better. Still, I don’t think I’ll ever want to watch this movie again (or I’ll at least have to fast-forward through the Phil Collins videos embedded in it). Thank goodness Disney did not continue this dreadful trend of having a famous singer sing all of the songs in the movie. I much prefer the actual characters in the movie to sing the songs so as not to break the enchantment of the movie with an unrelated voice/celebrity.

    The song I decided to analyze was “You’ll Be in My Heart”, but frankly all of the songs in the movie sounded the same to me and were pretty much interchangeable; they only served to stop the story and celebrate the glory of Phil Collins (I don’t normally hate Phil Collins so much, but this movie pushed me over the edge). It started out with Kala singing to baby Tarzan, and my first thought was “thank god it’s not Phil Collins singing the song”. But then, HE DID!! The song’s goal was to show the bonding between Kala and Tarzan, and the visuals did a decent enough job, but I couldn’t help but feel we’ve seen other songs/scenes like this in other Disney movies that were more effective. It was just okay.

    Besides the whole Phil Collins debacle, the other major issue I have with the movie is the over-humanization of the wild animals in the jungle (and Tarzan). In making these animals “human”, they make it hard to generate the level of “suspension of disbelief” needed for me to buy into (and enjoy) the movie. Examples include:
    • Would a gorilla really come running when a human baby cried?
    • So a gorilla knows what a picture/family portrait is?
    • Why would an elephant be worried about bacteria? Would they even understand the concept of microscopic creatures?
    • So Tarzan just “creates” a spear and uses it to kill the cheetah. Are we supposed to assume that tool making is a genetic (as opposed to a learned) skill?
    • Would a baboon chimp really be so friendly to a human if they’d never seen one before? And why would the baboon chimp be so vain with respect to a drawing of himself?
    • Of course Tarzan can speak English perfectly the first time he hears it. I get that they’ve established Tarzan as a master of mimicry, but surely it must take some time to become so proficient at specific sounds. Also, there seems to be a fair amount of comprehension to go along with the mimicry. How would he know what human words mean so easily?
    • Related to that, could he really learn the English language in a matter of days (as seen in the montage)?
    • Why doesn't Tarzan have a beard? I noticed this when he seemed so fascinated by Clayton’s mustache.

    [​IMG]

    • Why hadn’t Tarzan found his parents’ tree house if he’d been living in the jungle for so many years?
    • Of course, Tantor can see through his trunk like a periscope.
    • Would a ship of that size really have been tipped so easily by the weight of one elephant?


    2. The only kitty in the movie is Sabor, but he’s just a killing machine so there’s not much to analyze. So, I guess I’ll analyze Kerchak. He’s initially portrayed as kind of a villain, but I found him to be a flawed character and not that likeable. He’s the gorilla leader, and he argues that his issues with Tarzan are that “he’s not our kind” (I want to say that he’s “racist” but he’s probably more “speciesist”??). If he truly believed that Tarzan was dangerous, then he shouldn’t have allowed Kala to keep him. Since he decided to allow Kala to keep him, then why didn’t he embrace his role as Tarzan’s “father”? Instead, Kerchak is depicted as a cold, unloving, and abusive (step-) father that must be tiptoed around or violence will ensue. Not exactly the best image to be showing in a Disney film since many kids in the audience might actually have someone like that in their lives!! But it does fit in with the whole “stepparents are evil” motif that Disney loves so much…

    The movie had a chance to reconcile stepfather and son after Tarzan killed the cheetah (saving Kerchak), and it looked like that might have happened if it were not for the gunshots. Once the other humans enter the movie (especially Clayton), we start to see Kerchak depicted in a new light. Now we see the writers trying to convince us that he was only trying to protect the gorilla family (telling the gorillas and Tarzan to avoid the humans and protect the family). Even his terrifying over-the-top assault on the humans when Tarzan brought them to the gorilla camp was forgivable (and you feel sorry for him) when you recognize that he was trying to protect the family.

    In the end, Kerchak apologized to Tarzan for not accepting him into his family and called him “my son” before he died. Character redeemed. He kind of reminds me of Darth Vader in that we get a character initially portrayed as the villain to be redeemed and sympathetic at the end.

    I couldn’t help but feel that if Kerchak had accepted Tarzan as a child, then Tarzan would have trusted and loved him and that Tarzan would have accepted his warning about bringing the humans to the gorilla camp. So, I feel like Kerchak could have prevented all of this just by being a loving father. I also feel like Kerchak’s character flaws are part and parcel of Disney’s attempt at humanizing the gorillas to be “more like us”. A wild animal (like a gorilla) would be immediately suspicious of a foreign baby being brought into the camp (especially a different species) but we expect a human to be okay with adopting a non-relative. As such, it feels like the writers couldn’t decide whether to make Kerchak more “human” or “animal”.


    3. The scene I chose to analyze is the one where the gorillas (Terk & friends, along with Tantor) ransack the human camp. I don’t have much to say about this scene other than (much like chimney sweep dance number in “Mary Poppins” and “Portobello Road” in “Bedknobs and Broomsticks”) it just seemed to grind the movie to a halt. I don’t feel like it contributed anything to the plot of the movie, it didn’t move the storyline along, and it bored the heck out of me. Another example of an “I’m bored. Why are they doing this?” moment in a Disney movie.


    6. and 7. The line I chose to analyze was one from Kala to youngster Tarzan: “We’re exactly the same. Kerchack just can’t see it.” I feel like this is the goal of the movie—to get us to see that even if we (humans) don’t all look the same, we are more similar than different and that we shouldn’t focus on the differences but should instead should work together to see the common good (I’ll admit, a lot of this is being influenced by the eulogies of Sen. John McCain). In the end, Kerchack does see it, and he accepts Tarzan as one of the family, and as his son.


    8. Some connections in this movie to others.

    The elephant stampede that Tarzan started (and was caught in but survived) felt very reminiscent of the wildebeest stampede in “Lion King”, but with a happy ending.

    We see a faceless/unmoving version of Mrs. Potts and Chip in the human camp, and we also get the admonition from Terk to Tantor that “these things aren’t alive”.

    When Tarzan returns to the dying Kerchak, Kerchak says, “You came back.” Just like Beast said to Belle in “Beauty and the Beast” as he was dying.


    9. The scene that is most iconic is probably Tarzan “skateboarding” through the tree branches.

    [​IMG]

    10. I chose this pin showing when Tarzan and Jane met (95873), and Stitch agrees (54549).

    [​IMG][​IMG]
     
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  18. Meritre

    Meritre Active Member

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    I don't know much about gorillas but I know they are intelligent. I don't think they would come running if a baby cried. Especially not if they can smell danger (Sabor)


    I wondered about these things, too. :)


    And, a little correction: Sabor is not a cheetah. I wondered if he's a Jaguar since those live in jungels but they live in South America so leopard is left and Sabor is mentioned beein a leopard in most places in the internet :) But Sabor has a very slim and elegant body, leopards are more sturdy and that is misleading.
     
    Last edited: Sep 1, 2018
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  19. unibear

    unibear DPF Charter Member DPF Charter Member

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    I was searching for the right jungle cat for Sabor. I didn't feel like cheetah was right, but leopard never came to mind. Thanks!
     
  20. Meritre

    Meritre Active Member

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    You're welcome :)

    For me the songs worked like something that hold the movie together but I can totally see that for other people it is more like interrupting. :) I read once that a good song should help move the plot forward and shouldn't stop it. (I think I already mentioned that several times.) It was originally meant for musicals but I think this works very well for the kind of Disney movies that have songs. (they are musicals - sort of) I've always found it fascinating that the same song, the same voice can awoke such different emotions in two different people. It's amazing, I think. :)
     
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  21. coblj003

    coblj003 DPF Charter Member DPF Correspondent

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    I hope this follows the trend of later Analysis deadlines, It looks like I have to put off Tarzan till tommorow; at least it's Labor Day weekend. I think we'll have a good family movie night even if I have to mention a certain boy band my wife was obsessed with when this movie came out...
     
  22. Meritre

    Meritre Active Member

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    I'm running late... I don't know if I'll have time tomorrow or the day after tomorrow to finish it mor and add some more thought so I'm posting this now as it is but I plan to add to it if I can do it tomorrow. So part 1:

    1. What is your overall impression of the film? Some possible talking points include: what you did or did not like about it; what about the film has stuck with you; what did you find different on this viewing; how would modern audiences respond to this (for the older films)… The list goes on. Hahah!
    I haven’t seen this movie in a few years but I always loved the music. I sometimes got the feeling that it’s made of two main parts, the arrival of the Porters marked the start of the second part of the movie. My problem is, I felt like these two parts aren’t connected very well. The first part mainly focuses on presenting the situation, our main character growing up, it shows his struggles, what he’s good at and what he’s not so good at and bulds up the relationships –family, friands and leader. The second prt deals more with the trouble that comes with the new humans turning up. I have to say, I liked the first part better. The songs being similar helped to connect them a little but I don’t think I’ll rewatch it often, perhaps parts of it.
    I also remember playing a computer game similar to the ones that went with The Lion King, Aladdin and The Jungle Book (thoise are the ones I know and have played) but this was the first one in 3D. I always got lost when I changed the camera angle. I also remember that the intro shots used for the first two levels were young Tarzan climbing up the tree and having difficultias (and where Terk helps him) and the other was young Tarzan hanging upside down and climbing a lian next to a chameleon.

    2. Choose one specific character to analyze. You can explore how a character acts, what they say, how they dress, etc. to explain what they may represent or their function and meaning in the narrative. Try to avoid obvious "plot" stuff (ex: the Evil Queen is a villain, so her purpose is to be bad...), but explore unique and specific elements about the character (ex: the EQ is surrounded by images of peacocks, further suggesting her obsession with vanity). You may also use these elements to explain why you connected or disconnected from the character.
    Very difficult choice. Kala is my favourite from the movie and I connected with her the most but I think I have the most thoughts about Kerchak so I’ll go with him. He is a lot like King Triton – a ruler that wants to protect his family and greatly dislikes humans. I can’t help but feel that it is due to some bad experience in the past that he hates humans. Even Kala told Tarzan to leave the Humans be and she loves Tarzan as only a mother can love her child. Possibly a lost or hurt family member? I think an explanation why they are scared of humans would have helped. Bu kerchak just ignored Tarzen throwing at him why he hates everything that’s different.
    While Triton loves Ariel from the start, Kerchak dislikes Tarzan just as all other humans and I don’t think that helped Tarzan to become someone he actually could like (I mean less awkward – see all those accidents while growing up)
    When Sabor is killed and Tarzan offers Kerchak tha body I feel there is an important moment in their relationship – a first step. Definitaly something Kerchak remembers in the end when he finally accepts Tarzan as his son and appoints him his successor.
    I read that in the original book he was the main villain and he was the one who killed Tarzans parents. I’m glad that they changed that. His character development is really nice the way he is portrayed in this movie.

    3. Choose one specific scene or sequence to analyze—tell me what response is it trying to evoke from the viewer and how does it go about getting that response? Your analysis could include the scene’s use of color, action, camera angles, music, character development, setting, backdrop, style, etc. If you can justify it with evidence from the scene, then it’s an analysis!
    The beginning was very interesting with the switching between the families, I feel like that showed more than anything that “two worlds, one family”. It starts out dark with light only from the burning ship and lights because of a storm.
    [​IMG]

    One of these light des the first switching from humans to gorillas. It is dark but this is a peaceful darkness, unlike the semi darkness with the human family. And look how the two families are on the same spot and are darker than their surroundings.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    With the next switch it is morning and we are back to the human family.

    [​IMG]

    And even the sun shines down on the tree they chose to build a house on.

    [​IMG]

    The next switch is really clever from dads face to dads face.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    The next one is even better, one baby is thrown up and the other falls back down.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    And when the accompanying song and the sequence ends, it’s night again but it is somewhat scaryer tham the night before.

    [​IMG]

    Thatt last picture is Sabor overshadowing both the Gorilla and Human familys‘ resting places, indicating that Sabor will harm and tear apart both families. And with that, at the same time, bring tham together.

    4. Choose one song to analyze—tell me what response is it trying to evoke from the viewer and how does it go about getting that response? What purpose does this song have in the film and does it succeed in that purpose?
    I chose Strangers Like Me because it has a lot of interesting things going on at the same time. It is mainly about Janes and Tarzans relationship growing, Tarzan learning about the human world and his relationship to all three of them, Jane, the Professor and Clayton. But he doesn’t only learn, he teaches and shows his world, too, but only to Jane. The song is tho shows how fascinated he is about all thouse new things he learns and sees and most importantly – love and Jane. I think he gets the feeling like he belongs for a little while.
    The hun title is something like “This ‘beeing a stranger’ feeling”

    5. Choose one specific symbol in the film to analyze. A symbol is typically something inanimate, an object, rather than a character. So don’t say “Brer Bear represents dumb people,” as that’s more of a character analysis than a symbol. Rather, think about specific objects (jewelry, clothing, houses, food, weapons, etc.) What does this symbol mean and how does that meaning impact the film?
    Hands seemed such an important part so I’ll choose that. Hands are connections reltionships. Between species, between strangers. Kala feels connected to baby Tarzan first when their hands touch. Before this moment she was cautious.

    [​IMG]

    But after it, she smiles. Something started to fill the empriness left in her heart by her son. Tarzan doesn’t replace him but helps her to accept it.
    They also deepen their relationship through that.

    [​IMG]

    “Just take my hand, hold it tight”

    Later she teaches through hands that they are more alike than different.

    [​IMG]

    Tarzan himself comfirms for himself with hands that they are alike when he meets Jane. And he feels connected at once.

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Sep 2, 2018
  23. Meritre

    Meritre Active Member

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    part 2:

    6. Choose a single line of dialog that you find to be the most significant/impactful line in the film and why. You can be a little loose with the “single line” bit, but let’s not go for Maleficent’s entire monologue to Philip... Rather, something like Stitch’s “This is my family. I found it all on my own. It’s little, and broken, but still good. Yeah – still good.” (brb weeping).
    “Kerchak said I don’t belong in the family […] Look at me!”
    That’s what troubles Tarzan from the very beginning and that is what gets resolved in the end. He sees and feels that he is different and the others doesn’t make this easier for him, especially Kerchak.
    I think I choose a very similar line for Hercules. But how the parents handle it is very different and very similar – I mean Kala shows him where she found him and Hercules’ fosterparents tell Hercules that they found him and took him in. Kerchak hgoes a completely different route, he doesn’t make things easier for him and doesn’t accept him until the end, there he sees what he did wrong and tries to correct it as far as possible.

    7. What is this film’s overall goal? Is it to teach a specific lesson (what is it) or get an emotional response (such as)? Or both? And how well or poorly does the film succeed in that goal? Be specific!
    Yet another aspect of the being different palette is shown. This time it focuses on that we have more in common than we think and it is better to look for what we have in scommon and share. Probably makes accepting easier. It’s different from the focusing on the part that makes you unique.
    It is also about learning from past mistakes (Tarzan – constantly, small mistakes, but most important – Kerchak)

    8. What connections or progressions do you see in this film to past films? Example: how does Sleeping Beauty progress (or digress?) the princess archetype built in Cinderella? Be specific! Also, consider what use there is in returning to or re-imagining those elements?
    As this movie is also about being different it is strongly connected to Beauty and the Beast, The hunchback of Notre Dame and Hercules where this is a very important aspect. In this case, Tarzan is different, different species.
    This reflection appearing reminded me strongly of The Lion King. And both Simba and Tarzan are about to get advice from the one mirrored in the water.
    [​IMG]
    Also, the Porters have cups and a teapot that came from Beauty and the Beast.


    9. What is the iconic shot of the film? What single frame of animation do you find to be the most memorable and why? Post it! You can check out this link to find some great screencaps to help!
    This choice may seem odd but this is the shot that stuck me through the years, since I last saw this movie.

    [​IMG]

    “No words can describa a Mother’s tears. No words can heal a broken heart.”
    “There are no words for a Mothers tears. Words can’t handle such grief”
    For me it’s the most emotional and memorable moment of the movie.


    10. What single pin do you think best represents this film for you? Why? Give us the pin number and post a picture!
    A rare case when I liked the title of the pin more than the pin itself. But it really works for me and shows the most important aspect of Tarzan for me: Love is an Adventure – Love is Acceptance
    Many characters have a connection to that, some find that connection easily, like Kala, some harder, like Kerchak.
    Pin 123476 WDW – Love is an Adventure 2017 – Love is Acceptance: Tarzan and Kala
    [​IMG]

    Runner up was the pin @unibear choose, the one from the hand comparing scene

    Stray thoughts:

    The translations is much closer to the original than in Mulans case, it’s pretty much the same as the original with a few little changes, like the second Always at the end of You’ll be in my heart was changed into as long as you live.

    Sabor reminded me a bot of Shere Khan from the book version of the Jungle Book.

    Gorillas and lions are similar in a way – they both live in families and of the leader male gets older and/or weaker, he is chased away or even killed.

    I suppose it is well known that the closer Jane and Tarzan get, the less fancier she and her clothes look?
     
  24. MerlinEmrys

    MerlinEmrys Hicitus Pinicus!

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    477   0   0

    1. Overall Impression
    This has never been one of my favorite Disney films, most especially because of the songs (which I’ll get into shortly). The characters, for the most part, are delightful and there are some really tender scenes. But there was just something lacking about it. This is also marks the shift in how Disney utilizes music as a storytelling element, and I think it was generally a poor change. So however much I love Jane as a character, she alone can’t save this one—but not for lack of trying!

    Overall, I’d call this one “tone deaf.” It has the right spirit, but its singing is just off key…


    2. Character Analysis
    Real quick, shout out to Tarzan’s human mom! She was just as capable as her husband in building that treehouse WITH a baby on her back! I was impressed!


    3. Scene Analysis
    What I really did like about this movie is how it dealt with Tarzan growing up. As with several other films, I wish we had gotten to see more of it. But one scene in particular was right on the money in how it dealt with the sometimes tenuous relationship between adults and children. Right after little Tarzan causes the elephant stampede, Kala comes to his rescue against Kerjack. The two adults argue back and forth, but the camera is locked on Tarzan’s face. With both the adults off shot, all we hear are their voices, which puts us in Tarzan’s shoes as he also doesn’t look up to see them. The idea of adults arguing “over” children’s heads is probably a tired motif, but man is it effective. Because the point isn’t that the adults are arguing (they do that all the time…). It’s that this argument is having an effect on the kid. So to have the camera stay on Tarzan for this scene was really smart, as I would imagine it resonated with a lot of kids in the audience on some level.


    4. Song Analysis
    So this isn’t a tirade about any single song as it is screaming at the idea behind WHY IN THE WORLD DID PHIL COLLINS DO ALL THE MUSIC!? I’m sure other have mentioned this, but having all of the music be just Phil Collins all the time was really a break for me. Not because I don’t like Phil Collins (even though I don’t), but because the music became so removed from the film. And while some lyrics tied in nicely, to have this disembodied voice sing on top of the action was just so….jarring. The soundtrack (not the songs) for the film was excellent! And whenever Philly wasn’t singing, I felt more at ease. But it was like someone changed the audio and not the video when we see Tarzan’s human parents, tossed by a shipwreck and nearly killed, to see the promise of the island and then all of a sudden, here comes Phil “TWO WORLDS, ONE FAMILY!!!” WUGH! It was so bad and absolutely broke the magic…


    6. Dialog Analysis / 7. Overall Goal
    If this film’s goal is all about acceptance (which isn’t too difficult to pick up on), then Kala’s conversation with little Tarzan at the water’s edge is really poignant. The kiddo has rubbed mud all over his face because he hates that he looks different from his family. And in his anger, he turns to his mother and shouts, “Look at me!” and in the calmest, most serene voice, she responds, “I am, Tarzan.” MAN!!! What a good freaking reply! She sees him as her son—no question. And that bit of writing did a great job of conveying that love.


    8. Connections

    I mentioned it during Rescuers Down Under, but Clayton was a lot like McLeach in his design, manipulative manner, and overall character. Not exactly a bad thing, but it was hard not to see the resemblance.


    9. Iconic Shot
    Gotta be the Hand scene:

    [​IMG]

    (though that angle makes the Jane Profile ski-jump of a nose make a bit more sense now…)


    10. Representative Pin
    I wasn’t sure what I was going to choose for this one before really diving into the (few) pins that are out there. But in a rare occurrence, I think the Musical Moments pin got it right on the money!

    [​IMG]
    Pin 16340 DS - Magical Musical Moments #29 - Two Worlds (Jane and Tarzan)

    In addition to doing the hand scene, the jungle framing is a nice addition. Plus, the song actually accurately connects to the scene! Good job! XD


    Stray Thoughts:
    --I had somehow forgotten that Rosie O’Donnell voiced Terk, but it was a pleasant surprise. Hahah!

    --Speaking of things I had forgotten, I did NOT remember that Kala’s kid got eaten by Sabor!!!! Holy poop! There was a lot of drama packed into that opening montage (and TOTALLY undercut by freaking Phil Collins………)

    --I really hated Phil Collins in this…. I think too it’s that he does it ALL. Unlike Lion King, which was all written by Elton John by performed by the characters, this was just all Philly all the time which make it feel like oil and water…
     
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  25. MerlinEmrys

    MerlinEmrys Hicitus Pinicus!

    Rating - 100%
    477   0   0

    Okay, I've gotta get back on track here. XD I'll leave Tarzan submission up for the evening, but I plan to post the next films before I go to bed.

    Also, since my Sunday evenings are basically booked up, let's just go ahead and make it official that the cut-off time will be Monday morning when I get up. I'll be back onto that schedule starting next week. Thank you guys for being so self-sufficient! I'll also be updating everyone's medals tomorrow. :)
     
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