The Disney 52 Animated Challenge: Year-Long Activity - NOW PLAYING: Princess and the Frog

Discussion in 'DPF Game Room' started by MerlinEmrys, Dec 15, 2017.

  1. Meritre

    Meritre Active Member

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    I think the gif works even better than a simple shot :)
    They somehow remind me of the "friends on the other side" Dr Facilier has.
    At the seem time the stones every chief puts on the top of the previous drom Moana came to my mind.
    That would be only possible if the Atlantian language was actually english and they only used different signs for the letters. Something like the Runes? (before people switched over to the alfabeth that is used today)
     
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  2. pretty Omi

    pretty Omi Resident Smol Wolf

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    [​IMG]
    I just wanted to post this, because it's one of my favorite parts haha
     
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  3. timeerkat

    timeerkat Your Friend Who Likes To Play

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    That was my take on the line. Rourke sees the others as suckers for giving up on the fortune to be had and siding with the Atlantians. Though there is no evidence that Barnum said that, according to this site, back in the late 1800's/early 1900's, the line was already being attributed to him.
     
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  4. MerlinEmrys

    MerlinEmrys Hicitus Pinicus!

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    There was that bit about how Atlantian was like a "root" language that if you knew it you could roughly do most language. So I guess that's how they're trying to explain it away. That doesn't necessarily account for the letter for letter translation, but I think that's how they tried to set it up.

    I think if this was anyone but Disney, we'd have gotten a better explanation. But I think Disney just wanted to brush past it, hahah!

    Sent from my SM-G950U1 using Tapatalk
     
  5. MerlinEmrys

    MerlinEmrys Hicitus Pinicus!

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    [​IMG]
    Lilo and Stitch (2002)

    Monday/Tuesday is our "wrap-up" discussion on Atlantis: The Lost Empire. So you're welcome to respond to other analyses throughout the day.

    However, you may not post any more full analyses for Atlantis: The Lost Empire to count for completion toward the 52 Challenge. No late homework. ;P

    ~Merlin
     
  6. MerlinEmrys

    MerlinEmrys Hicitus Pinicus!

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    Sorry to keep you waiting, @unibear ;P
     
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  7. Meritre

    Meritre Active Member

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    A really quick one:
    9/23 – 9/29: Lilo and Stitch (2002)
    1. What is your overall impression of the film? Some possible talking points include: what you did or did not like about it; what about the film has stuck with you; what did you find different on this viewing; how would modern audiences respond to this (for the older films)… The list goes on. Hahah!
    I didn’t really remem ber this movie except for that I didn’t like it until I rewatched it with my sister a few months ago. It was fun and both of us liked it very much. Both of us pointed out that the relationship between the sisters is realistic. Lilo isn’t a perfect kid but she didn’t annoy me although I did understand Nani getting frustrated because of her. But it was portrayed as if it could happen in real life. And I think the sisters have a relationship as good as with all the scars and frustration they have it can be (losing parents, bullying and trying to manage job upbringing and running a houshold) It was a very nice moment when it was shown that both of the girls let the steam off the same way – screaming into a pillow.
    Also Nani and most of the other humans have proportions closer to what real humans have. That being said I never had an issue with the Disney princesses having unrealistical body proportions. I just knew they didn’t have to be realistic even as a child. :)
    The watercolor backgrounds (at least they looked like watercolor) were so beautiful.

    2. Choose one specific character to analyze. You can explore how a character acts, what they say, how they dress, etc. to explain what they may represent or their function and meaning in the narrative. Try to avoid obvious "plot" stuff (ex: the Evil Queen is a villain, so her purpose is to be bad...), but explore unique and specific elements about the character (ex: the EQ is surrounded by images of peacocks, further suggesting her obsession with vanity). You may also use these elements to explain why you connected or disconnected from the character.
    Nani is a really intetesting character, different from the earlier female leads. She tries her best to mange their little broken family, trips and stands up again. Her relationship with her little siste is unique and much more realistic than the perfect sister relationship Anna and Elsa share at the end of their movie.
    Maybe she’s even trying too hard to give Lilo a perfect home and upbringing and everything. She cares for her very much whe she accidentally overhears that Lilo wishes for a friend she immediately takes action – they go to adopt a dog.

    3. Choose one specific scene or sequence to analyze—tell me what response is it trying to evoke from the viewer and how does it go about getting that response? Your analysis could include the scene’s use of color, action, camera angles, music, character development, setting, backdrop, style, etc. If you can justify it with evidence from the scene, then it’s an analysis!
    I choose the part when they’re in the ocean and Stitch almost drowns. As he sinks deeper it gets darker – the less chance he thinks he has to survive. His creator pulls hum into the darkness, his new family pulls him back into the light.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Although Cobra wears black and so seems like a threat, he stands in the light when he watches them saving Lilo and Stitch.

    [​IMG]

    The first hint that maybe he is not bad but is really tring to help them. This impression is strengthened by his words when he talks to nani right after that. He still wears black and is still the bringer of bad news. Also the sun is going down, also implying that things are getting worse for the little family

    4. Choose one song to analyze—tell me what response is it trying to evoke from the viewer and how does it go about getting that response? What purpose does this song have in the film and does it succeed in that purpose?
    I really liked the little song Nani sung to Lilo when it is made clear that Lilo is going to be taken from her. I think the sadness and saying goodbye is more important than the lyrics that’s why it is made that we only understand part of it. It helps a lot to fill its purpose and I think it’s really emotional this way for all of them. And a good songdoes wake emotions.

    5. Choose one specific symbol in the film to analyze. A symbol is typically something inanimate, an object, rather than a character. So don’t say “Brer Bear represents dumb people,” as that’s more of a character analysis than a symbol. Rather, think about specific objects (jewelry, clothing, houses, food, weapons, etc.) What does this symbol mean and how does that meaning impact the film?
    I think I’ll choose the book with thestory of The Ugly Duckling. It stands for lonliness and being unhappy but happiness and fanily at the same time and understanding those things. I think Lilo taught Stitch a lot with this story. They turn to this book in their moments of sadness.


    6. Choose a single line of dialog that you find to be the most significant/impactful line in the film and why. You can be a little loose with the “single line” bit, but let’s not go for Maleficent’s entire monologue to Philip... Rather, something like Stitch’s “This is my family. I found it all on my own. It’s little, and broken, but still good. Yeah – still good.” (brb weeping).
    “I like you better as a sister than a mom...and you like me better as a sister than a rabbit, right?”
    I choose this one because it tells everything about the relationship and one of the biggest struggles of the sisters. Their relationship was my favourite thing from the movie.

    7. What is this film’s overall goal? Is it to teach a specific lesson (what is it) or get an emotional response (such as)? Or both? And how well or poorly does the film succeed in that goal? Be specific!
    I think it teaches about the importance of family and loved ones. Even if it’s not perfect (no family is) it’s great and it’s the best thing to have. Family and loved ones.

    8. What connections or progressions do you see in this film to past films? Example: how does Sleeping Beauty progress (or digress?) the princess archetype built in Cinderella? Be specific! Also, consider what use there is in returning to or re-imagining those elements?
    It is connected to all the films with Stitch invading all the most iconic scenes from other movies.
    The Ugly Duckling isn’t a direct Disney connection but like The Little Mermaid and The steadfast tinsoldier it is a story by Andersen and in the book Lilo has we can see Disney’s version of the story.

    9. What is the iconic shot of the film? What single frame of animation do you find to be the most memorable and why? Post it! You can check out this link to find some great screencaps to help!
    Can’t really explain except it’s a beutiful moment and somewhat the essence oft he movie - family
    [​IMG]


    10. What single pin do you think best represents this film for you? Why? Give us the pin number and post a picture!
    Pin 24081 M&P - Lilo, Stitch & Nani surfing

    [​IMG]

    Because it’s their moment of bonding as a family. I also wanted Nani to be in the picture.

    Runner ups are all the Stitch with all Ugly Duckling pins and Pin 26226 Disney Auctions - Story of Lilo & Stitch #8

    [​IMG]

    Also a very beautiful moment but it already got some sportlight under the song analysis section :)

    Stray thoughts or rather some observations, detials I liked:
    At the beginning, only Lilo smiles during the dance classes, at the end, all of them smile - a smile makes a dance performer even better, even if it's no perfect :)

    I love how the Grand Councilwoman was reasonel and not a villain. Actually the story doesn't really have a villain and thats both interesting and unusual - a great choice in my opinion.

    I can't do an analysis without at least one translatioin reference: the word 'belong' is hard to translate and would have been odd in my language if the exact same word would have been chosen. It was replaced with 'beeing loved'. I think such differences are really interesting.
     
    Last edited: Sep 29, 2018
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  8. unibear

    unibear DPF Charter Member DPF Charter Member

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    We’ve finally hit one of my absolute favorite Disney films, and the one that got me in to pin trading. And, of course, the movie that introduced the concept of ohana to the world.

    1. My overall impression of the movie… Several things:

    First off, I LOVE the music in this film. The whole Elvis nod was really cool, given that he filmed “Blue Hawaii” there and that made him very popular with the Hawaiians. Plus, his music is cool. I really wish they hadn’t had Winnona (sp?) redo his song; it’s fine… but it’s not ELVIS! Also, I loved the Hawaiian songs used in the opening credits and the surfing scene. Very cool to use authentic music from the region and make it enjoyable (also not a fan of the Maroon 5 rehash).

    This is another movie I end up quoting quite a bit. Usually just phrases though:
    • How naughty!
    • Pudge controls the weather.
    • Crazy-head!
    • You get disciplined? With bricks! …in a pillowcase.
    • Lo-lo
    • Abomination! Stupid-head!
    • My friends need to be punished! (Not usually with voo-doo, however.)
    • Tricky-fish!
    • You are vile! You are foul! You are flawed! Also cute and fluffy!

    I like that Lilo and Nani fight like sisters, and both scream into pillows when they are frustrated with the other one. I really found the wish making/gravity fight amusing! Just one question. Why is Lilo SOO much smaller than Nani?

    Stitch starts out the movie as evil, sort-of. I would describe him more as chaotic evil; he does evil things not because they’re evil per se, but because he’s programmed to spread chaos. I think as the movie progresses, Stitch changes from chaotic evil to chaotic neutral (and maybe chaotic good?). So, I think he was able to change his goodness but I don’t think he was able to get rid of his chaotic tendencies.

    Stitch scurries like a cockroach, clinging to walls and ceilings. Kind of disturbing. In the series, he tends to behave much more dog-like.

    I’m not going to discuss these in the song analysis, but I really like that they use the songs to progress the story. I’m thinking of “Devil in Disguise”, where Stitch is transformed from chaotic evil to just chaotic (but not yet a “Model Citizen”) and “Hawaiian Roller Coaster Ride” where Stitch realizes that he wants an ohana of his own, and starts (maybe) accepting his role in Lilo’s ohana.

    OK, at the near end of the movie, why didn’t Nani just take Lilo WITH HER to the supermarket to get the job? I know, then Lilo wouldn’t have been able to call Cobra about the house being attacked, and setting the stage for Cobra to take Lilo. But, still…

    I love the gas tanker scene! I love Stitch stopping the truck, then him driving it with the hula dancer bobble-head on the dashboard, crashing it in the lava, and using it to propel him up to Gantu’s ship. Nicely done!


    2. OK, I’m going to do something a bit different here. I’m going to analyze the main villain in this film—but that means I have to analyze TWO different characters. ‘Lilo & Stitch’ is unique in that the role of main villain in the film actually changes as the film progresses. Now, I know some Disney movies have a classic “mis-direct” to make you think one character is the major villain and then the actual villain is later shown (I’m thinking of Kerchak and then Clayton in “Tarzan” or Kaa and then Shere Khan in “Jungle Book”), but this is the only (?) film where two main characters actually change roles as the villain. I think this is why there are so VERY few Disney villain pins from “Lilo & Stitch”.

    The character that changes the most is evil scientist, Dr. Jumbaa Jookiba. The movie starts out with him on trial for illegal genetic experimentation, which he admits “would be irresponsible and unethical… I would never make more than one!” OK, but they call his experiment (on trial with him) “Experiment 626”. So, um, what about #1-625??? (That is actually the basis for “Stitch: The Movie” and “Lilo & Stitch: The Series”, both of which I totally adore as much as this movie, but for different reasons.). They even call him an “idiot scientist” but Jumbaa says: “I prefer evil scientist”.

    After being arrested and being told of 626’s escape, he is “hired” by the Grand Council to capture Stitch on Earth in exchange for his freedom. Throughout most of the film, as Jumbaa and Pleakley try to capture Stitch, it’s still pretty clear that Jumbaa is being evil, as he is willing to shoot Lilo while going after Stitch and (after being fired, which means he is not under Galactic rules anymore) attacks Stitch and hints that hiding behind Lilo won’t help anymore as he and Stitch destroy Nani and Lilo’s house.

    We only get to see his “transformation” from evil scientist to Uncle Jumbaa very late in the film. When Jumbaa finally captures Stitch after Lilo is kidnapped, he still manhandles Stitch during the capture. He and Pleakley briefly talk to Nani, and we start to see remorse/regret for Lilo being stolen from Nani. Then Jumbaa’s whole demeanor/mindset changes when Stitch asks him to help save Lilo: “After all you put me through, you expect me to help you—just like that? Just like that?!” And then, poof, he’s no longer a villain and now a hero with the simple explanation, “He’s [Stitch] very persuasive.” I have to admit, that this transformation feels a bit unrealistic and unearned. We never got so see any real change in Jumbaa—although we do see him observing Stitch’s changes as Stitch tries to adapt to being part of Lilo’s ohana and his quick exchange with a clearly heartbroken Nani—but still this complete switch feels completely contrived and arbitrary.

    This brings me to our emerging villain, Captain Gantu. He doesn’t really change much throughout the film, but we see his villainy was always there and we see it emerge as the film progresses. Gantu starts out as an assistant to the Grand Councilwoman, as a Captain of the Galactic Guard. Once he is placed in charge of 626, we get to see that Gantu is a prototypical “bad cop”—his treatment of the captured 626 is unkind, and he seems to enjoy taunting and tormenting the prisoner. He threatens to shoot 626, and Gantu’s underling has to warn him that he is “still on duty”, implying to us that Gantu has a history of reckless and less-than-heroic behavior toward prisoners.

    When the Grand Councilwoman sends Gantu to Earth to get Stitch, she plays on his vanity toward his reputation, saying this could be a way to redeem himself for letting 626 escape initially. So, Gantu now has a personal motive for getting Stitch beyond mere duty. Gantu also makes it clear that he feels the need to punish Stitch.

    Finally, when Gantu captures Stitch (along with Lilo), he is definitely unconcerned over her welfare or protecting the innocent, instead acting gleeful over her capture and telling Stitch: “And look, I caught you a little snack!”

    With the case of Gantu, his character “change” feels more realistic because it isn’t really a change at all; if you look back throughout the movie, his behavior and mindset have always been a bit morally dubious. So, these actions (which feel in character for him) eventually change his role in the film from bad cop to villain.

    This transformation of Jumbaa from evil scientist to part of Lilo and Stitch’s ohana (Uncle Jumbaa) and the transformation of Gantu from bad cop to evil henchman is much more pronounced if you consider not only “Lilo & Stitch”, but also the sequel “Stitch: The Movie” and the subsequent TV show “Lilo & Stitch: The Series”.

    (continued)
     
    Last edited: Sep 29, 2018
  9. unibear

    unibear DPF Charter Member DPF Charter Member

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    3. The sequence I chose to analyze was from Nani and Cobra’s discussion after the drowning incident up until Cobra tries to take Lilo away after their house is destroyed.

    These scenes are genuinely heart-breaking, as we see that Lilo’s ohana is literally on the verge of being destroyed. And yet, Cobra Bubbles isn’t being played as a villain. He’s genuinely concerned about the welfare of Lilo, and if Nani is fit to raise her. When he says, “You need to think about what’s best for Lilo. Even if it removes you from the picture”, you can feel Nani’s heart break (and I started to tear up). Nani decides that she has to take Lilo home so that they can have a talk. Right now, Lilo is pretty oblivious to the danger, but David knows and he tells Stitch that, “I really believed they had a chance. Then you came along.” Now Stitch knows.

    The hammock scene is just as heart wrenching. Nani and Lilo sit together in the hammock, and Nani tries to have “the talk” with Lilo, but it’s clear that she’s holding back for fearing of getting too emotional. I’m going to analyze the hammock scene in greater detail below in 4. and 5, but what he see is that Nani and Stitch know about the impending separation, but Lilo still doesn’t know.

    Stitch decides to leave, but I’m not sure if it’s because he thinks if he goes, Nani and Lilo can still be together, or if he’s just devastated about losing his new ohana and can’t deal with the emotions so he just decides to bail. In any event, we get another heartbreaking quote from Lilo: “…if you want to leave, you can. I’ll remember you, though. I remember everyone who leaves.” Close to crying again.

    In the morning, Nani is miserable and sitting at the table, waiting for Cobra to take Lilo away, and Lilo comes down and is miserable because Stitch left. Then Nani says, “Sometimes you try your hardest, but things don’t work out the way you want them to. Sometimes things have to change, and maybe sometimes they’re for the better.” Lilo thinks Nani is talking about Stitch leaving, but obviously Nani is talking about Lilo being taken away. Man, are they trying to make me break down and bawl?

    It’s not until the house is destroyed, and Cobra Bubbles has put Lilo in his car before Lilo finally realizes that he is planning to separate Lilo and Nani. In part, because Nani is desperately yelling at Cobra, “But you don’t know what you’re doing! She needs me!” and he responds, “Is THIS what she needs? It seems clear that you need her a lot more than she needs you.” That usually pushes me over the top.


    4. and 5. The song I chose to analyze was “Aloha Oe”, sung by Nani to Lilo in the hammock.

    The hammock scene is one of the most emotional scenes in this movie. Nani and Lilo sit together in the hammock, and Nani tries to have “the talk” with Lilo about her being taken away, but it’s clear that Nani is holding back for fearing of getting too emotional. So, she sings “Aloha Oe” to Lilo. The lyrics are so compelling, and appropriate, and just hit you in your gut: “One fond embrace… Until we meet again.”

    When they release their flowers together to the winds, it symbolizes them going their separate ways. Stitch is sitting on the ground near the hammock and you can see that he is just as devastated as Nani that the ohana he has just found and become part of is breaking apart, even though Lilo doesn’t know.


    6. I feel like my analysis in question 3. was all about analyzing quotes, but I thought I’d go another route here. I hope others will talk about all of the ‘ohana’ quotes, but I wanted to talk about the quotes about 626/Stitch and how other people saw him.

    As 626, he is viewed as “a flawed product of a deranged mind” by the Grand Councilwoman. Later in the film, Gantu calls him “Abomination!” (Stitch responds with, “Stupid head!”) and says “You are vile! You are foul! You are flawed!” (Stitch responds with, “Also cute and fluffy!”) So, from the galactic viewpoint, 626 is clearly viewed as dangerous, very much like Frankenstein’s Monster.

    Nani, in talking to the authorities on the phone says, “I think it might be a koala. An evil koala. I can't even pet it. It keeps staring at me; like it's going to eat me.” She also says to Lilo, “Look at him, Lilo. He's obviously mutated from something else. We have to take him back.” Nani is concerned about her and Lilo’s safety, and I guess her initial attitude pretty much matches that of the Grand Councilwoman and Gantu.

    Jumbaa, when having a conversation with a lost Stitch who is looking for his family says, “You were built to destroy. You can never belong.” Jumbaa is also viewing Stitch as his own monster creation, but Jumbaa does see that Stitch wants to be more.

    In contrast to all of these quotes are those from Lilo: “Send to me an angel… the nicest you have.” (To be fair, he did drop from the sky like an angel, and Lucifer was a fallen angel, so maybe she should have been more specific…). Also, when she picks him out at the pound, she says “Yes, he’s good. I can tell.” Presumably that’s in reference to him being a good choice as a pet, but from the start it is clear that Lilo views him as good, or at least capable of good. You can see this in the “Badness Level” chart she makes for Stitch. Mostly bad, but he’s still got some good in him and she can see that: “This is your badness level. It's unusually high for someone your size. We have to fix that.” I think that Lilo is able to reach Stitch and reform him because she sees the good in him, while not ignoring the bad.

    [​IMG]

    7. and 8. The goal of this film is a retelling of “The Ugly Duckling” (“Ugly Dachshund”? That’s a Disney movie, right?) fable. It’s clearly referenced in the movie, but it doesn’t feel like this movie is just a re-hashing of this story. Still feels like he has no family and that he is unworthy of one, based on what others have said about him and how they act toward him (just like Quasimodo in “Hunchback”). But he really wants a family, and he eventually finds one. Thankfully, Lilo took the lesson from “Beauty and the Beast” and “Aladdin” (and more) about not judging a person (puppy) by his appearances.

    Of course, I would be remiss if I failed to mention all of the Disney “Stitch Invades” pins, which originally got me into collecting Stitch pins. I love all of the scenes from the movie previews that were shown on TV and the short film on the DVD about Stitch’s long and not so illustrious career as a Disney bit player before becoming famous in his own movie.


    9. So many scenes to choose from! I’m baffled! OK, I chose this scene when Lilo puts the lei on Stitch and says, “You know, you wreck everything you touch. Why not try and make something for a change?” The minute she put the lei on him, he instantly calmed down. It was the first sign that Stitch could be rehabilitated.

    [​IMG]


    10. Again, SOOO many pins to choose from. I wanted to go for a pin with the ohana, and the end credits had so many pictures of the family just being a family. It is interesting to note that in almost all of them it is Nani, David, Lilo, & Stitch. No Jumbaa or Pleakley. For the movie’s purposes, the family of four makes sense but from the TV series, Lilo’s ohana is Nani, Uncle Jumbaa, Aunt Pleakley, Lilo, and Stitch (and David is still Nani’s boyfriend). So I chose these two pins.

    The first one (43847) represents Lilo’s ohana based on the movie (N, D, L, & S); I wanted a scene with the statue, but there isn’t a pin of that, so I went with the Graceland scene because… Elvis!

    [​IMG]

    The second one (35101) represent Lilo’s ohana based on the TV series (N, J, P, L, & S); this is pretty close to the image of the only scene in the movie with these characters together. Few scenes had Jumbaa and Pleakley, but this one had Jumbaa with a Santa beard visiting the family for Christmas.

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Sep 29, 2018
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  10. unibear

    unibear DPF Charter Member DPF Charter Member

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    @Meritre We did it again! I was CERTAIN I would be the only one analyzing "Aloha Oe" as the song, but you did too! I will say, part of the reason we don't understand all of the lyrics is that some of them were sung in the native Hawaiian language. The song was written by Queen Lili'uokalani (the last Hawaiian monarch) in 1878.

    We also agree about the sisterly arguments between Lilo and Nani and the whole villain issue.
     
    Last edited: Sep 29, 2018
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  11. Meritre

    Meritre Active Member

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    :) :) :)
    I suspescted that it was in their native language but forgot to look it up properly so I left that out. They also kept those parts in the Hungarian dub.
     
    Last edited: Sep 30, 2018
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  12. Meritre

    Meritre Active Member

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    I wonder if he is just like Stitch - having greatpotential to be good, maybe even sharing a special bond with his creations - I mean he too learns whatever they learn. Just an idea that came just now.
     
  13. unibear

    unibear DPF Charter Member DPF Charter Member

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    I remember the TV show saying something about there being a flaw in the evil designs of all 626 experiments, which allowed them to be turned to good.
     
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  14. timeerkat

    timeerkat Your Friend Who Likes To Play

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    Eek, the week got totally away from me. Can post my entry tonight.
     
  15. Meritre

    Meritre Active Member

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    I didn' know there was a TV show untill this week and I haven't seen the sequel, either but I'll watch it sometime - it seems interesting. :)
     
  16. coblj003

    coblj003 DPF Charter Member DPF Correspondent

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    1. Overall Impression
    [​IMG]
    It's been awhile since I saw this movie and it was easy to watch it on netflix. Both of my daughters were entranced by it and I gave it a solid 4 stars. This marks another movie in which it is not the stereotypical Broadway style that Disney was becoming(and later) known for. I did read that this film was being created on a budget($80 million) which was considerably less than its predecessors, so all things considered it is still a big winner on the box office. The poltline is relatively easy to follow, and if you look at it closely it puts together alot of pop culture references to alien invasion conspiracies(Area 51, roswell, etc). Disney is on point to recover At trying to diversify ifs cast of characters; from the Hawaiian main cast, Russian sounding Evil Scientist, LGBT friendly style alien, African American SecrervAgent, etc. The art direction was good, I particularly like the water color like backgrounds though there are parts that are obviously CG versus handrawn. The soundtrack was also great mixture of traditional Hawaiian and Elvis music, the latter known especially known for his Hawaiian movies/cover music.

    2. Character Analysis
    [​IMG]
    Pleakley is the one of the Aliens trying to recapture Stitch or risk losing his job at HQ. As this is the turn of the Millenium, Prime-time TV has already shown a wide variety of LGBT representation though Children's programming has largely made the topic of such taboo; I even recall an Episode of Arthur/Postcards from Buster on PBS that was banned past its initial run as it showcases a lesbian couple with their two kids. Disney as such explores the portrayal of a "safe" effeminate LGBT character, showing an Alien trying to disguise itself on earth as if a Fish out of Water scenario. Pleakley is very charasmatic and devoted about of his job, though his mannerisms impling he loves to dress female despite being a male and and into largely female interests; in a deleted airline scene he remarks about wanting to have a matching luggage set off an airline magazine. I also recall the Lilo and Stitch television show having a male friend of Lilo show an attraction to Pleakley's female dressed side, though I don't think it is addressed beyond that. Pleakley also reminds me a bit of the Futurama character Kiff, a similar male alien character that also becomes pregnant in a later season and gives birth to ironically a green one eyed tadpole.

    3. Scene Analysis,
    [​IMG]
    The morning of Lilo's impending departure, the kitchen is a dull blue symbolizing dispair, Nani unsure of what happens afterwards. As David comes to inform Nani of a job opening, the morning light from the open door envelops the room leaving it pink and therefore a much cheerful and hopeful mood.
    [​IMG]

    4. Song Analysis
    [​IMG]
    He Mele No Lilo is an adaptation of a traditional Hawaiian song He Iona No Kalani Kalākaua Kulele, which was made to honor of King David Kalakaua on his passing. He is also known as the patron of the arts providing for a resurgence of the Hawaiian art of hula dancing. This song has traditional accompaniment and singing only in the Hawaiian Language versus the Hawaiian roller coaster song which has a similar beat but includes modern instrumentation as well as English versing.

    5. Symbolism
    [​IMG]
    Lilo's handmade doll represents her want of nurturing that is severely missing after her parent's passing. As she and her sister are lacking in terms of monetary means, she is probably left to make a baby doll on her own that she lovingly gives a frakensteinish biography; her outbursts from earlier have her seen as different from her peers as they look down on her for though it seems they have progressed past her in spite as they have also moved on to Barbie dolls versus baby dolls.

    6. Quote
    [​IMG]
    "Ohana, Ohana means family, Ohana means nobody gets left behind or forgotten..."
    This touching quote is often grudging applied between sisters Nani and Lilo, but then comes apply to Stitch's acceptance into the family. As the term comes to apply to the support group beyond the Pelekai family, it grows to encompass David, Pleakley, Jumbaa, and even Cobra Bubbles as showcased in the photos at the end of the film. The final photo is the slightly repaired photo of the Lilo and Nani happily with their parents along with Stitch taped at the bottom.
    [​IMG]

    7. Overall Goal
    The ultimate goal of the film is to showcase the objective stance of nature versus nurture; does a creature who is "programmed" for ultimate mayhem have the ability to be trained to become sentinent and become an "ideal citizen". You also have a simile to today's scientific climate with the creation or modification of new/existing creatures/crops. You have one side that judges that is ethical to tinker with new creation along strict guidelines versus that of absolute prohibition.

    8. Progressions
    [​IMG]
    This is the 2nd Feature of three that was produced by the Florida Studio. Nani has a poster in her room showcasing their first production of Mulan. This also references Nani's character as a strong female role model.

    9. Iconic Scene,
    [​IMG]
    My iconic scene would ultimately be the Aloha Oe hammock scene but to end on an unused note I'll take the finale of both Lilo and Stitch dancing at the Merrie Monarch Days; MMD itself is a real and prestigious world reknowned Hula dancing festival named in honor of the King David Kalākaua(who David is also named after) whom helped upstart the conservation of Hawaiian traditions, Hula dancing amongst them. Note the sponsor of the fictional Tsunami Airlines...

    10. Representative Pin.
    [​IMG]
    Pin 37405 Disney Auctions - Lilo & Stitch Hula Class - (Gold Artist Proof)
    This pins follows my iconic Scene of Lilo's halua reaching the Merrie Monarch Festival.

    Stray thoughts

    Initially the rescue of Lilo was supposed to involve the misfit group of heroes hijacking a fictional Tsunami Airlines 747 jet plane to help save Lilo from Captain Gantu; by which they chase him through the city and gives a few nods To alien invasion movies. The sequence was mostly finished before being scrapped/revamped due to the events of 9/11. As such this scene is the one where the finished product feels rushed with noticeable CG. After watching it, I actually prefer the original concept if only for a bit more tongue/cheek humor as it is roughly the same scene overlapped.



     
    Last edited: Oct 1, 2018
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  17. pretty Omi

    pretty Omi Resident Smol Wolf

    Rating - 100%
    18   0   0

    Woof. I've seen this before, and fully knew about it, but after just watching it again, I'll have to disagree and say I'm SUPER glad Disney decided to change this scene. Not only because the red alien space ship makes much more sense "What, did you think we walked here?", but wow yeah, that whole scene hits way too close to home after 9/11, even 17 years later. Good on Disney for seeing that, and making the necessary change.
     
  18. timeerkat

    timeerkat Your Friend Who Likes To Play

    Rating - 100%
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    1. Lilo and Stitch is one of my favorite post-2000 Disney movies. Personally I have a strong family connection to it; we didn't go out to a lot of movies when I was growing up, but it was a family tradition to go see the Disney movie together every year when it came out. Lilo and Stitch was the final movie we all went and saw together, since by that point most everyone was off at college or graduated and not coming home for summers anymore.

    I love the visual aesthetic. The watercolor backgrounds are gorgeous, and the characters are well-designed and diverse. I love the variety of alien life shown (most of which are based on Earth animals - hammerhead sharks, dinosaurs, armadillos, etc.) The soundtrack is also great - I love the blend of Hawaiian music and Elvis. Most of the Elvis songs reflect what is going on in Lilo's life, which is appropriate as he is her idol.

    Frozen gets high praise for being a movie all about strong sister bonds, but Lilo and Stitch did that long before they did. Even though they fight, and Lilo doesn't always know how to express her feelings in constructive ways, they ultimately love each other and would do anything for each other.

    I can count on one hand the number of movies I have cried at, but Lilo and Stitch is on the list. The scene where he brings The Ugly Duckling to the clearing and cries out "I'm lost." hoping for his family to come just kills me every time. There is so much emotion in that scene with just two small words, and it really shows off Stitch's growth past "unstoppable destruction machine."

    2. I chose Pudge - the "fish who controls the weather." He also acts as a window to our understanding of Lilo.

    After the opening scene with Stitch escaping to Earth, we are introduced to the setting of most of the movie. The first named character we see is Pudge, swimming away with a sandwich in his mouth. If it's your first time seeing the movie, you have no context for this; it's just a fish with a sandwich. The very next character we see is Lilo, swimming back to shore. But, since we don't see her give Pudge the sandwich, we don't know the two are related yet. She just seems like a girl enjoying a swim. Later on, Lilo tells everyone the story of Pudge and his sandwich. Suddenly this earlier scene makes sense.

    No one seems to believe Lilo's story, and are just angry or annoyed at her for being late and making up stories and consider her crazy (Myrtle says as much to her). But, since we have already seen Pudge with the sandwich, we the audience know that she was telling the truth. Through Pudge, we get a deeper understanding of Lilo. She sees the world differently and experiences things that the others do not, but she is truthful about it despite others thinking otherwise. It clearly upsets her that she doesn't fit in, but she doesn't change herself just to get peopel to like her. Without Pudge at the beginning, it would take us longer to understand this about her. So even though he is only in the movie for a few seconds, he actually plays a very big role.

    7. This film delves heavily into nature versus nurture, in favor of nurture. Stitch's nature is explicitly told to us - he was built to destroy. That's pretty much all of his programming. His nurture side is the same at first - that is all Jumba expects of him, and everyone else on the alien world sees him as a monster. The Grand Councilwoman asks him if there is anything good in him, but up until now all he knows is destruction, so he can't demonstrate otherwise. It's only when his environment changes and Lilo takes charge of him that this starts to change. Her nurturing, and willingness to see good in him even when he has destroyed everything, starts changing him. He starts to want more for himself than just to destroy - he wants a family. He also uses his destructive tendencies to help others instead of delight himself. As a result, this teaches us that no matter what we start as or where we come from, we can change and become better versions of ourselves.


    9. I have two shots that I cannot pick between.

    The first is the scene with Stitch in the clearing calling for his family. Not just because it gets to me emotionally, but also this is a perfect demonstration of his growth as a character.

    [​IMG]

    The second is Lilo and Nani together in the hammock. This is just the perfect quiet little scene that captures the true sister bond they have.

    [​IMG]

    10. From several films with very few options to too MANY options! It was hard to pick between the seemingly thousands of pins, but I went with the Stitch profile, because it shows Stitch with the Ugly Duckling book, asking Lilo to explain to him (the singular moment when I think the change in nurture really takes hold, since it is the first time he seems to want to learn something besides just information on how to destroy).

    [​IMG]

    Pin# 130202 - WDI - Heroes - Stitch
     
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  19. Meritre

    Meritre Active Member

    Rating - 100%
    2   0   0

    I actually prefer this sister relationship both are godd but this one is more realistic and so more relateable. :)
    It's a very touching moment. (And this one was actually another hard one to translate in one word so it became alone instead of lost. I think that works too)

    Such a great analysis! :)
     
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  20. timeerkat

    timeerkat Your Friend Who Likes To Play

    Rating - 100%
    256   0   0

    Ooh, forgot to add this! I noticed a Hidden Mickey on the octopus on Pleakley's face! :)

    [​IMG]
     
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  21. coblj003

    coblj003 DPF Charter Member DPF Correspondent

    Rating - 100%
    26   0   0

  22. MerlinEmrys

    MerlinEmrys Hicitus Pinicus!

    Rating - 100%
    477   0   0

    Crap! I. Thought I posted this Monday! Good thing I stopped to read the posts while I was waiting for a shift change at the park! (and that I had it on my dropbox...)

    1. Overall Impression
    This has always been one of my favorites. The characters are well designed and fleshed out, I adore the subtlety of some of the plot (the parents), and the message is just spot on. It doesn't overreach and try and be really high and mighty in its goal; it embraces its silliness and uses it to its advantage (like Stitch pretending to be a dog). Overall, this film makes me smile (and cry).

    2. Gonna pull double and talk about the sibling bond between Nani and Lilo. While Frozen got a lot of buzz for having a sibling focus instead of romance, I think that pales in comparison to this film. The moment that seals it for me is when Nani and Lilo are screaming at each other (GO TO YOUR ROOM!!!) and the tension is so ramped up, and then Nani grabs a pillow and screams, and then we see Lilo doing the same thing.

    [​IMG]

    This is more than just a funny moment, it drives home that they're siblings, that they're so much alike they drive each other crazy, and that they share something as mundane as a reaction to a bad situation. Nani's terror at Lilo being taken away is heart wrenching. And Lilo saying "I like you more as a sister than a mom" is just so... I don't know. Real. And raw. Like, what a gut punch since it draw attention not just to the fact that they've lost their parents and Nani has to step up, but that it's not working! Man, it just gets me. I think these two are my favorite siblings in Disney...

    3. Scene Analysis
    When Cobra Bubbles (whom I love) finally intervenes to take Lilo from the situation, he puts her in the car and we hear, muffled, the argument between him and Nani. The face that we aren't outside the car, hearing the fight directly puts us in Lilo's position, hearing this really heavy moment the same way she is. It's a small choice, but rings true with the relationship between children and adults and how just because a child is "absent" from the immediate scene doesn't mean they don't hear or can infer what's going on. And hearing the muffled argument through the car window is a great way to demonstrate that dynamic.

    5. Symbol Analysis
    It may be a bit on the nose, but I think Scrump is a great projection for Lilo. Something horrible has happened to the doll (bug laid eggs in it ear) that is effecting it internally but manifests externally (her big head) which makes people want to distance themselves or look at Scrump diffently or judge her.

    The same is happening for Lilo. With the death of her parents, something has changed for her inside, which manifests in her outward aggression or acting out. And people don't know how to respond to her, so they end up just trying to distance themselves. Nani has that great line, "They just don't know what to say..." and man is that ever true. So Scrump does a few things: it shows us how Lilo is projecting her feelings on this doll, but also shows how troubling other's reactions are toward Scrump. The other children were so mean that Lilo actually threw the doll down and left her. But then immediately went back and gave her a huge hug. Because Scrump is Lilo, and all she wants is for someone to love her and not look at her like she's crazy.

    [​IMG]

    (6. Dialog Analysis

    Not really an analysis but I love this line from Bubbles. It's so so so good.)

    [​IMG])

    9. Iconic Shot
    This one is super tough for me. My knee jerk response is them all surfing, but I think the real hear of the film comes out when Stitch is in the forest with the duckling book and looks up so forlorn....

    Gif

    10. Representative Pin
    There. Are. So. Many. Stitch. Pins. Sweet. Geebus.

    Okay I'll compromise. I went with a non knee jerk scene, so I'll choose this for my rep pin!

    [​IMG]



    *Stray Thoughts*
    *I realized only recently that Jambaa and Cogsworth are the same voice. And I somehow love it even more. XD

    *from Russ: "Is David, like, the most chill Disney character ever?" Yes. Yes he is. God bless him.

    *I love the connection between Pudge and Lilo's parents. It's a little thing you have to put together yourself, and the film doesn't dwell long on the parents' death, but there's enough in the film to demonstrate that the filmmakers were fully aware of the point and just wove it in subtly. I loved it.

    *Stitch is so emotive. XD like, I think he has more expression than most Disney characters.

    *the are style in this film is one of my all time faves. The background art especially is super pretty.

    *lol, Earth is area 51. XD

    Sent from my SM-G950U1 using Tapatalk
     
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  23. MerlinEmrys

    MerlinEmrys Hicitus Pinicus!

    Rating - 100%
    477   0   0

    [​IMG]
    Treasure Planet (2002)

    Monday/Tuesday is our "wrap-up" discussion on Lilo and Stitch. So you're welcome to respond to other analyses throughout the day.

    However, you may not post any more full analyses for Lilo and Stitch to count for completion toward the 52 Challenge. No late homework. ;P

    ~Merlin
     
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  24. unibear

    unibear DPF Charter Member DPF Charter Member

    Rating - 100%
    51   0   0

    I’ve never seen this movie before. I recognize that it is an adaptation of Robert Louis Stephenson’s “Treasure Island”, a point the movie makes with the subtlety of a sledgehammer…


    1. My overall impression of the movie… Several things:

    As I mentioned above, this movie is a (thinly veiled) adaptation of “Treasure Island”. Much of this movie is oddly “set” in 1700’s Earth, even when it doesn’t make sense! Some examples:
    • OK, so why would spacecraft look like ocean-going vessels from 1700’s Earth? It’s just a little too much “in your face” and lazy on the part of the writers/animators.
    • Why must the clothes of the humans, and many of the aliens and robots, also match the customs and norms of 1700’s Earth fashions?
    • I’m glad they mentioned the whole idea of artificial gravity, but they NEVER addressed the need for oxygen and creating an “airspace” on the exposed bridge of the galleons since these ships just HAD to look like 1700’s Earth vessels with people on the OUTSIDE of a ship where there is no atmosphere!
    • In the book, I’m guessing that the ship had to escape a really bad storm. So this movie turned a bad storm into an exploding supernova and a black hole. OK, but there just isn’t an easy (any) way to escape a black hole. This felt very contrived and unrealistic, which made this whole scene unenjoyable.

    The movie actually excels when it can move away from the direct mapping of the 1700’s Earth story it is “adapting” and instead allowing it to be more logically an extraterrestrial adventure story. Examples include:
    • Changing Long John Silver from a one-legged pirate to a Cyborg, and the instant hand attachments he could create and use.
    • Changing the pirate map to a technological orb that only Jim could open. It also allowed for some more cool scenes at the end of the movie to get to the portal and the treasure.
    • Turning the moon’s sliver in the sky into a crescent-shaped spaceport was really unexpected and cool!
    • The whole portal to other universes was a cool twist to the plot, and could explain why Captain Flint could be so successful in swooping in and out during his conquests. Not exactly new though, as it was taken (almost verbatim) from an episode of “Star Trek: The Next Generation”.

    Other issues:
    Morph just annoyed the heck out of me. Not all that endearing (even at the end), and an obvious plot point. The minute Morph started grabbing the orb, I KNEW that Jim would end up taking the Morph-orb and not the real one. I do wonder why Mr. Silver didn’t figure out that if Jim had Morph, then the orb must still be on the ship.

    Jim was REALLY STUPID to tell Mr. Silver right off the bat that he knew that Mr. Silver attacked and destroyed his mother’s inn. Why did he do that? He just made an immediate enemy and put himself in immediate danger as the owner of the orb; if he had kept him mouth shut, he could have been more “invisible” as a future target.


    2. OK, I chose to analyze Captain Amelia because she’s a kitty… sort of. While I really like the character, I don’t think I’ll be collecting pins of her for my kitty collection. I find her to be a good foil for Mr. Silver. While Jim seems to be taken in by Mr. Silver’s “father act” immediately (more later), the audience (me) isn’t entirely convinced. On the other hand, Captain Amelia is, from the start, very obviously a good character ruled by honor and integrity. While she might be rude or brusque or dismissive (especially to Jim and the Doctor at the start), she is always above-board and honorable. This is also shown in her relationship with the first mate, who also appears to be honorable and trustworthy, which makes his demise all the more deplorable. Captain Amelia also shows an admirable strength of will (and physical strength) in dealing with her physical injuries, and still trying to do her job of protecting all of those under her command. She shows that she is willing to change her mind about a person given additional information—her views of the Doctor change from viewing him as an annoying but useless charter to recognizing that he can provide helpful information in the supernova/black hole escape. Her opinion also changes in more a romantic direction when she sees his caring and take-charge behavior while she is injured.


    3. and 4. The sequence/song I chose to analyze was “I’m Still Here”. In this scene, we see Jim working with and learning from Mr. Silver. We also see that Jim quickly falls into a “relationship” where he sees Mr. Silver as a father figure. It’s clear from this scene that Jim has abandonment issues because his father left, and we start to realize his previous bad behavior was him acting out because he is severely lacking a male authority figure. Even though Jim knows (or at least suspects) that Mr. Silver was the Cyborg who attacked him and destroyed his mother’s inn, Jim immediately warms to Mr. Silver as a father figure. The audience (me), however, is not so convinced. During this song, I was still on the fence about Mr. Silver. I certainly didn’t trust him as much as Jim did, but I do see moments of begrudging respect for Jim and signs that he actually cared for Jim. But, I was still convinced that he would ultimately betray Jim in order to get the treasure.


    6. The quote I chose came from Mr. Silver, in one of his heart-to-heart conversations with Jim: “Sometimes plans go astray.” I don’t know if this quote comes from “Treasure Island” but it does feel an awful lot like a quote from John Steinbeck’s “Of Mice and Men” (“The best laid plans of mice and men often go awry.”). Clearly, this is good advice from a more traveled elder to a young apprentice, and it certainly has relevance in this movie. Jim plans to get rich from the treasure and live a life of leisure and riches; otherwise, he believes that his life has no future (and neither turn out to be true); Mr. Silver has spent much of his life searching for the treasure, but is willing to lose it to save Jim (certainly not his plan when Jim first arrives); and certainly Captain Amelia and the Doctor hadn’t planned to get together (married) and have kids together.


    7. and 8. While the “best laid plans” thing could be viewed as one goal of this movie, it is clearly yet another rehashing of the whole outsider hero not fitting in. Jim starts out as a lost young man on the path to becoming a delinquent (just like Stitch, starting out as an evil experiment). But then he takes a wonderful adventure and matures and changes his behavior and outlook, becoming a true hero who helps to save his friends (just like Stitch, changing his behavior and saving Lilo from Gantu, and saving Lilo’s ohana). Of course, this trope is becoming a rather tired and predictable storyline for just about every hero/heroine in a Disney film of the 1990’s and early 2000’s (Quasimodo, Hercules, Mulan, Tarzan, Aladar, Kuzco, Milo, Stitch). I understand it’s a powerful idea, and I believe that some movies did it better than others (“Hercules”, “Lilo & Stitch”), but it would be refreshing to watch a Disney movie from this era that doesn't have this storyline running through it…


    9. I couldn’t really think of an iconic scene in the film. So, I decided to go with a shot of the planet with the iconic “X marks the spot” imagery.

    [​IMG]

    10. Man, from “Lilo & Stitch” with literally thousands of pins to a list of about 100. I chose this pin (14983) of Jim riding his solar cycle.
    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Oct 7, 2018
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  25. timeerkat

    timeerkat Your Friend Who Likes To Play

    Rating - 100%
    256   0   0

    Watched this for the first time; will post my write up tonight.
     
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