The Disney 52 Animated Challenge: Year-Long Activity - NOW PLAYING: Princess and the Frog

Discussion in 'DPF Game Room' started by MerlinEmrys, Dec 15, 2017.

  1. Meritre

    Meritre Active Member

    Rating - 100%
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    As I love the books about Bambi and his children there will be a lot of comparing in my analysis.

    1. What is your overall impression of the film? Some possible talking points include: what you did or did not like about it; what about the film has stuck with you; what did you find different on this viewing; how would modern audiences respond to this (for the older films)… The list goes on. Hahah!
    I watched this movie for the first time for this challenge. It was quite nice but quite different from the original book. Just like in Bambi, the young deers look a bit too small and young to me compared to the adults. (also the young rabbits – they didn’t really grow) It also seems to have borrowed elements from the sequel book, Bambis Children. Bambis son Geno gets into a fight with a former friend like Bambi did with Ronno. Ronno was an older adult in the first book, who had once one of his legs shot and limped a little because of that.
    Bambi falling for the luring of Man was in the original book, too, but Bambi was a little older already and the hunter imitated Faline calling for Bambi. His father saves him there (although differently), too and shows him that it was a human who imitated Falines voice.
    The backgrounds are really nicely done.

    2. Choose one specific character to analyze. You can explore how a character acts, what they say, how they dress, etc. to explain what they may represent or their function and meaning in the narrative. Try to avoid obvious "plot" stuff (ex: the Evil Queen is a villain, so her purpose is to be bad...), but explore unique and specific elements about the character (ex: the EQ is surrounded by images of peacocks, further suggesting her obsession with vanity). You may also use these elements to explain why you connected or disconnected from the character.
    I guess this one will be about comparing book prince and movie prince. In the book he is actually called the old prince (and he also dies at the end of the book of old age and Bambi succeeds him as the prince of the forest)
    In both cases the relationships doesn’t start of the best way. (In the book, they meet way before Bambis mother dies, she just left him alone for a while and the prince scolded Bambi for crying for his mother so loud. But he also teaches him how being alone is safest. I guess this is a scar that took Bambi long to overcome, also, he learned from it. With his own children, he told them beforehand that Faline, their mother is going to disappear for a while and that they need to be extra careful. (The moms leave the young ones alone to spend times with their mates in the books))
    Unlike in the movie the old prince never really had a hand (or should I say hoof?) in rising young Bambi, he grew up with the others that spent a lot of time together while it was still winter and a cranky old doe helped him survive and reised him. (She was also taking care of Faline until she finds her mother again since she got separated from her during that scary day, also Falines mom went to look for Falines little brother Gobo, who fell and was unable to stand up again and was found and raised by the hunter)
    Movie prince has a lot of trouble communicating with a child, he mostly forgets or he isn’t actually aware that Bambi is still a young child who just lost his mother and has little to no experience what humans are like and how they lure what they want to shot. I felt it was unjust of him scholding Bambi for that. And one can’t really control being so scared that you can’t even move. I didn’t really understand that, my only explanation is that he was just as scared as Bambi to lose his son just like he lost his mate.
    Movie prince seems to feel like he is uncapable of taking care of Bambi properly, book prince has no such trouble as his relationship with his son becomes more important only when Bambi is already a grownup. But the prince does things for him like nursing Bambi back to health when he is shot, teaching him his ways to sneak around the forest noiselessly and he also teaches him about humans. Their relationship seems almost perfect unlike in the movie where after an uneasy start, things become even more complicated. But it works out in the end.

    3. Choose one specific scene or sequence to analyze—tell me what response is it trying to evoke from the viewer and how does it go about getting that response? Your analysis could include the scene’s use of color, action, camera angles, music, character development, setting, backdrop, style, etc. If you can justify it with evidence from the scene, then it’s an analysis!
    The winter scenes are all white and use cold colors, representing the hardships but Bambis dream about his dream uses only warm, sunny colors like yellow and red, to show a moment of peace and comfort, forgetting all the troubles of the real world that comes to us when we dream.
    [​IMG]
    The counterpart is the prince standing in the rain, his sourroundings are dark, it's raining (which is often a hint for sadness) he is sad and can’t find that peaceful momen Bambi did.

    [​IMG]

    4. Choose one song to analyze—tell me what response is it trying to evoke from the viewer and how does it go about getting that response? What purpose does this song have in the film and does it succeed in that purpose?
    First Sign of Spring is about Bambi and his father bonding and he starts teaching things to him. The spring in their relationship finally came. The song is a nice background to that and to me it really feels like spring – gentle, warm and overall very nice, a little like a mother. Maybe it also indicated that they overcame their loss thanks to each other.

    5. Choose one specific symbol in the film to analyze. A symbol is typically something inanimate, an object, rather than a character. So don’t say “Brer Bear represents dumb people,” as that’s more of a character analysis than a symbol. Rather, think about specific objects (jewelry, clothing, houses, food, weapons, etc.) What does this symbol mean and how does that meaning impact the film?
    The dead tree Bambi has to get across is somewhat a symbol of the distance between him and his father. He is trying to overcome it but he is scared so he tries the easy way – under the log. That doesn’t work, and not until he figures out his relationship with his father can he jump over it.

    6. Choose a single line of dialog that you find to be the most significant/impactful line in the film and why. You can be a little loose with the “single line” bit, but let’s not go for Maleficent’s entire monologue to Philip... Rather, something like Stitch’s “This is my family. I found it all on my own. It’s little, and broken, but still good. Yeah – still good.” (brb weeping).

    “Where one thing falls, another grows”
    It’s such a simple line yet I think it helps little Bambi a lot to cope with the loss of his mother. It also reminds me of Mufasas teching about the Circle of Life.
    She is possibly reffering to Bamsbis relationship to both of his parents – if his mother had not died, he would never had become so close to his father. (The continuation of this phrase makes it clearer) And this movie is about Bambis relationship with his father.

    7. What is this film’s overall goal? Is it to teach a specific lesson (what is it) or get an emotional response (such as)? Or both? And how well or poorly does the film succeed in that goal? Be specific!
    It’s about family and the difficulty of communicating emotions properly. Also about accepting and trying to see things positive – as Bambis Mother teaches that to him.
    I’m not sure if it was it’s goal to show ways to cope with losses like losing a mother and a mate but it is also an important part.

    8. What connections or progressions do you see in this film to past films? Example: how does Sleeping Beauty progress (or digress?) the princess archetype built in Cinderella? Be specific! Also, consider what use there is in returning to or re-imagining those elements?
    It’s interesting to see a sequel that's actually a midquel, but it was the same with Beauty and the Beast – there were parts of the story that could be explored more deeply, it is the same with Bambi. Also because the book doesn’t give much information on that part of Bambis life, there were no expectations to follow that part of the story exactly.
    Bambi wanting to show his father that he can be brave like him strongly reminded me of young Simba – he went to the Elephant Graveyard partly for that reason. Also trying to give a scary roar is a bit like Simba.

    9. What is the iconic shot of the film? What single frame of animation do you find to be the most memorable and why? Post it! You can check out this link to find some great screencaps to help!
    Bambi meeting his father seems quite iconic and as the pin is their meeting at the beginning in winter, I choose their meeting at the end:

    [​IMG]

    10. What single pin do you think best represents this film for you? Why? Give us the pin number and post a picture!
    I wanted a pin with Bambi and his father and I found this one. (There are plenty with Bambi and his mom)
    Pin 100787 WDW - Imagination Gala - For Every Laugh There's a Tear - Bambi and the Great Prince of the Forest ONLY
    [​IMG]

    Stray thoughts:
    I know that seeing the shadow thing with bears (it's in the TV every year in february, people watch the bears in the zoo) If he sees his shadow, he crawls back into his cave to sleep some more if he doesn’t he stays outdide, because spring is near. It’s mainly based on what people observed throughout the centuries.

    The Prince's hideout was also taken from the book, it is describes in detail that there is a pit under a dead tree and that’s where he hides.
     
    Last edited: Oct 29, 2018
  2. unibear

    unibear DPF Charter Member DPF Charter Member

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    @Meritre You know, I was going to pick that Bambi / Father pin as my pin! I decided against it because it was supposed to be a sad event from "Bambi" where Bambi loses his dad, but it is a really pretty pin and does seem to represent this movie pretty well.
     
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  3. Meritre

    Meritre Active Member

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    In the hungarian version, they used that title :)
     
  4. coblj003

    coblj003 DPF Charter Member DPF Correspondent

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    Ugh, I have worked 40 hours in the past 3 days and still won't be home till later this afternoon. Hopefully I can post something but if not there will be a bonus...
     
  5. timeerkat

    timeerkat Your Friend Who Likes To Play

    Rating - 100%
    256   0   0

    Home on the Range

    1. I really didn't connect with this movie, so this is going to be a very short review for me. It's just such a tonal shift from a lot of what they have done, and didn't seem to have the depth of the 90's movies or the cleverness of the 2000's ones. They tried to make it punny, but a lot of the jokes just fell flat to me. I'm not sure how much of a hand Roseanne had in the writing, but the humor didn't really seem to work for a Disney film. (And starting off with a boob joke? Eh....) It also had the very convenient plot device of a reward in the exact dollar amount they need to save the day.

    That being said, I didn't dislike it as much as, say, Peter Pan. I just don't think that I would ever watch it again unless it's for one of these film series.

    One of the saving graces for me was, well, Grace. I adored Jennifer Tilly's voice work in this; she gave Grace just the right amount of softness and sweetness without making her a pushover, and innocence without being overly naive. And except for some bits of the character design (those hipbones bother me, too), I do like the art style of the film. The animals are cutesy and the world is very colorful, to contrast the ruggedness of the Wild West.


    4. (You Ain't) Home on the Range (the opening song) is trying to set the tone of the Wild West. The banjo music, the whip cracks and "yeehaw"s, and southern drawl all add an air of the Southwest, and bring us into the setting via sound. The lyrics, however, don't truly match the spirit of the movie. They try to paint the Wild West as a macho manly man place where "the weak are target practice" and yet none of the characters are really that intimidating (well, MAYBE Rico). Even the villain is just plain goofy with overly dense sidekicks.

    Also, the lyrics negate the message of the movie, which is all about finding your home. Pearl specifically builds Patch of Heaven to be a home and treats everyone as family, so to have the theme song off the movie be about how in the Wild West "you ain't home on the range" just feels weird.


    7. As I mentioned before, the message of the movie is finding your home. Maggie, the main protagonist, loses her home and is brought to Patch of Heaven, which, while lovely, is not the home she knows. Pearl, Grace, and the other animals welcome her, but Mrs. Calloway's passive aggressive hostility toward her counters this. She recognizes that Mrs. Calloway doesn't like her and she thinks that maybe her home is somewhere else. However, after their adventure together, Mrs. Calloway accepts her fully and Maggie finds that Patch of Heaven is truly her home after all.


    9. I had to go with a shot of the family together - Pearl, the cows, and the other animals.

    [​IMG]


    10. It doesn't have Pearl, but there is actually a pin with most of the family together.

    [​IMG]
    Pin# 33024 - WDW - Cast Exclusive - Home On The Range (Dangle)
     
  6. timeerkat

    timeerkat Your Friend Who Likes To Play

    Rating - 100%
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    1. Bambi 2 is fine as far as sequels go, and was pretty enjoyable. The animation was "cleaner" and didn't quite match the charm of the original, but it wasn't distractingly different. Mostly I was left thinking that the movie wasn't entirely necessary. It gave us some backstory on Ronno, and there were some nice moments of Bambi connecting with his father, but otherwise it was more of the first - basically cute animals doing cute animal things in the forest.

    I didn't like it more than the Lion King sequels, but I did like it more than a lot of the other sequels (*coughcough*PocahontasLittleMermaidMulan*coughcough*) . I think that is precisecely becasue it DIDN'T stray too far away from the original.

    I liked the storyline about Bambi's father learning how to BE a father. He never had to care for a child, and is thrown into the situation with no preparation. I liked that they showed him struggling with this (The Great Prince has flaws!), and it took quite a long time before he knew just what to do. It showed that everyone has flaws, even someone as revered as him. To go along with that, I liked how they also showed him struggling with the death of Bambi's mother. Here he is, a graceful and majestic leader, and they allowed him to have and show emotion.

    And YAHOO for Patrick Stewart! They did a great job casting him in that role, because he has the perfect blend of gentleness and gravitas.


    2. Ronno serves as the main foe to Bambi, and is a traditional movie bully. He's brash and overly confident, he picks on the main character without provocation, and he takes pride in being a jerk. However, we know this is all a front, because when he is truly scared or hurt, he runs for his mother. Unlike many bully storylines however, he doesn't really atone or get a "redemption" arc in this. This is important, becasue it sets the base for him to come back in the original movie when they are adults still as Bambi's rival.

    He doesn't wear any clothes, but his antlers have significance. They show that he's slightly older than Bambi, but more importantly to reflect his character, they symbolize his combative nature. He loves to fight (it shows the others that he is a tough guy), and tries to pick fights with Bambi several times throughout the movie.


    6. "I think it's best to leave the past in the past. A Prince does not look back. Only ahead."

    The Great Prince goes into the movie with this mindset. He thinks that he needs to move on quickly from his loss - that that will be a show of strength. After all, princes need to be strong at all times. However, he comes to learn throughout the film that it is important to reflect on the past. He can't heal and move on unless he confronts what happens.


    9. I love the scene at the end, when the Great Prince brings Bambi to the spot where he first met Bambi's mother. This shows the progression of the Great Prince regarding looking bacon on his past, and it shows him really connecting with Bambi by sharing something so personal. I chose this shot because it is reminiscent of the final shot in the original Bambi, with the two characters on the clifftop together.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]


    10. This has the same problem that Lion King 1 1/2 had where few if any pins were actually meant to be for this movie rather than the original So, like everyone else, I chose a pin from the original that featured Bambi and the Great Prince together. I chose this one specifically since it was for Father's Day, and one of the main plots of this movie was all about the Great Prince learning how to be a father.

    [​IMG]

    Pin# 128821 - WDI - Father's Day - Bambi
     
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  7. coblj003

    coblj003 DPF Charter Member DPF Correspondent

    Rating - 100%
    26   0   0

    Going to post before the site goes down again, I'll post pics in a bit.
    Home on the Range

    1. Initial Impression
    [​IMG]
    So here we are at the grand finale of Disney's use of Traditional Animation using the CAPS program. This film garnered very critically bad reviews and gave the Disney Studio another substantial loss at the box office that they shuttered the 2D animation program in favor of 3D. This movie was also similar to The Emporer's New Groove in that it was changed midway in favor of a more Comical light, personally it seems that they just tried to salvage what they were able to and it seems that their choice of voice actors determined later on what tone the film ultimately held.
    [​IMG]
    Story setting wise, it was interesting to see a more modern take of Western(ex. no native american imagery) with a dash of diversity up to including African Americans in established roles(ex. Morse) though also leading up to an well awkward inclusion of a Chinese Immigrant. Much of the Art Direction is significantly different from Disney's later period, though I read it was trying to imitate the 1950's UPA studio style; The film also seemed to take creative inspiration from an earlier Disney western set piece, Pecos Bill. Personally, I love the lush Western Backdrops that we are given, and leaves me to wonder if it is a remainder of salvaged development. Musically, the Score is very "American Western" as much of the background riffs reminded me of parts of the Magnificant 7 score; The song "(We Ain't) Home on the Range", is very reminscent of a tall tale sung in Pecos Bill, while the general use of Country Songs give it a very area specific feel.
    [​IMG]
    Overall, I thought it wasn't as bad as the Critics said it is; but this is the same studio that gave us some of the World's best memorable Animation only a decade prior and gives us a feeling of just how low on the totem Disney has fallen in terms of Studio Direction; at best I have to give it 2/5 Stars.

    5. Symbolism
    [​IMG]
    When Rico rolls into town, there is a surge of Storm clouds rolling in that introduce us to Stern bounty hunter that it seems to make the impression that nature(well flies) takes notice of him by name. Only later does it come to light that the Ominous storm rolling In, which signifiy an omen of bad things to come, meant that he was actually the precourser to the area was soon to be hit by Alemeda Slim, as it turns out that Rico is actually hired to cover the latter's tracks.

    8. Progressions
    Slim's Yodeling Song when he Hypnotizes the Cattle Run is very similar to the Dumbo Dream Sequence, Pink Elephant's on Parade.
    [​IMG]
    The Willie Brothers are the set of Dimwitted triplets showcased in the film; this is a recurring theme in Disney movies, among the more (in)famous of those being the Bimbettes from Beauty and the Beast.
    [​IMG]
    The Two Trains facing each other on the same track is a similar trope found in other western/cartoons. The same setup is also used later in Zootopia, going as far as to push another animal to change the track manually before it collides.

    9. Iconic Shot
    [​IMG]
    Lets face it, for a critical dissapointment there aren't too many actual iconic shots that come to light. That said one the things I loved in the film is the natural depictions of the Wild West; this sunset when they first head out of town is amongst my favorite shots of the film.

    10. Representative Pin
    [​IMG]
    Pin# 36665 - WDW - Home on the Range Opening Day
    The Story behind this proto is actually more amusing then the movie it came from. The opening day pin for WDW(qty 2 preproductions) was never released and only came to light when one was auctioned on a cruise. Pinpics says that Disney most likely has the 2nd one in their vault but that is if they haven't already put it up for trade on a CM trading board/lanyard.

    Bambi 2.

    1. Initial Impression
    [​IMG]
    Generally when you hear of Disney Sequels, you think of horrible cash grabs with subpar budgets; thankfully this film is not one of those. While it does veer a bit from it's initial inspiration, they thankfully took creative lisence from the book that inspired it to make a sequel worth seeing, if not on the big screen. That said there parts that make it out that is is just a direct to video film, for instance many of recurring plot points between the great prince and Bambi look like it was taken directly from the Lion King. The Voice Casting is amongst the strong point, Sir Patrick Stuart as the Great Prince by far makes the film very watchable/and moving toward the end(This movie for one has a very moving Disney Moment). The rest of the cast also do a great job imitating their original counterparts.
    [​IMG]
    Much of the art direction makes it seem that much of the time/budget was put into it's primary stars, but alot of the secondary art sequences(ex. cartoonish detail of the butterfly hatching)point in the direction that it was a direct to video film. The music is a nice balance of orchestral and pop not over the top pop songs, I'm very reminded of later Studio Ghibli films such as the secret of arriety. In some regard, the score actually reminds me of a Rurouni Kenshin OVA in the sense that its sparse piano/horn play portray the similar feeling.
    The film itself is a nice balance for a Disneytoon Studio and very much improves upon its predecessors; I overall rate it 4/5 stars.

    6. Quote.
    [​IMG]
    Bambi's Mother: Everything in the forest has its season. Where one thing falls, another grows. Maybe not what was there before, but something new and wonderful all the same.
    I feel that this quote alone would be worth expressing to people who have lost someone, especially young children. Bambi reaches out for his mom, who symbolically comes back to him in his time of emotional need; and is a metaphor to how Bambi will continue to learn and grow throughout the rest of the film(s). Of course Disney has explored several ways of loss such as in Brother Bear and even into Disney's Later Production such as Frozen and Big Hero 6.

    8. Progressive Shots
    [​IMG]
    As this is a sequel, there is bound to be inspiration from the original but there are very similar situations to the Lion King/Frozen; For instance when The Great Prince is trying to sleep while Bambi is wide awake and trying to get him up.

    The end scene of the silouette of the Butterfly landing on the Branch is similar to how parts of the Fantasia Piece, The Nutcracker Suite, ends it's movements. signifying the end of that chapter.
    [​IMG]
    The hunter mimicking the Mother's calling is very similar the Twilight Zone Tower of Terror, when the little girl calls out right until the elevator drops.

    9. Iconic Shot
    [​IMG]
    I felt that the shot that best represented this film was during the Final Scene of The Great Prince showing Bambi the place he met Bambi's Mother. It does a good job of bringing to circle the importance that a parent holds special regard and brings a similar ending point when it showcases Bambia and the Great Prince standing side by side as similar it is in the original's ending.

    10. Representative Pin
    [​IMG]
    Pin# 128821 - WDI - Father's Day - Bambi
    As this is a Disney Sequel, there isn't too many pins that actually specify that its from the original or not. This pin does a good job of explaining the Emphasis on The Great Prince during the time the movie takes place.
     
    Last edited: Nov 2, 2018
  8. MerlinEmrys

    MerlinEmrys Hicitus Pinicus!

    Rating - 100%
    477   0   0

    Home on the Range

    1. Overall Impression / 8. Progression
    This was the first time I had ever scene this movie and…well…it’s not getting any awards from me, that’s for sure. Hahah! This film is often blamed for the “fall” of traditional animation as a profitable medium—well, that’s not because of its animation. It’s because its story is pretty rough. I had originally typed “quite awful,” but that sounded harsh. The plot was okay enough. But there were SOOO many weird, random, totally bizarre aspects of the story and character development that I felt really disconnected from the whole thing. I think I just had an eyebrow raised the entire film… And the film never really gave me a reason to just roll with it. We’ve had plenty of films that ask us, the audience, to suspend our disbelief (Rescuers Down Under, for example, and Cody’s magical animal talking ability—except for Marahute??), and for the most part we feel rewarded when we do give in to the film’s world. But Home on the Range’s world was just a bit too far. There were so many points of weak development that I couldn’t forgive jumps in plot or character. The background animation was breathtaking, the voice acting on point (yes, even Rosanne, despite the fact I didn’t like her character), and even some really good character designs and callbacks (the Sheriff looked a lot like Sir Ector from Sword in the Stone). But….the story was just too weak. I think if anything, this film should be praised because it taught Disney that you can’t just slap something together and expect people to fawn over it just because Disney put it out. Films like this gave other studios, like DreamWorks, the chance to creep up and start to retake some of that market—and we got some amazing films from that! So, if anything, I’ll give HotR credit for forcing Disney to step up their game.

    Overall, this film was just too kooky for me…


    2. Character Analysis / 4. Song Analysis
    Despite all of the wacky stuff with this character, Alameda Slim had some interesting concepts. His animation is amazing, and I really like the idea of him being a Pied Piper character…but…yodeling? That characterization literally never pans out. It’s the one thing I don’t like about Jessie (from Toy Story), and maaaaaaan do I not like it here. It’s just grating! XD And his song went from creepy villain to an obnoxious version of “Pink Elephants” in a flash and I was soooo confused. That was the point in the film where I just kind of said, “Welp, this one isn’t going to work…” There’s a line where things just get too weird for me, I guess. And yodeling must be that line…

    Also, what’s the obsession with Slim’s pants and butt?? He’s (ironically?) called “Slim” but, as the song says, his “chaps are XXXXL” and he has “10 gallon underpants” and he gets his cousins to slap him on the butt? I just re-watched the song to get those lines…and I’m just kind of flabbergasted at how that even made it to the film…


    3. Scene Analysis
    Speaking of flabbergasted and wondering if anyone was actually going behind and checking anything about this film, did anyone else catch the bar fight scene where one of the show girls turns out to be an audience guy’s father!?

    [​IMG]

    So, again, I’m wondering why this got slipped in? Is it just for the gag? It’s never revisited! It’s just one of those moments where I’m like “What was the thought process here…..”


    7. Overall Goal
    The goal of the film seems to be the adage of “It takes all kinds” or something to that effect. You’ve got a fastidious (British) matriarch stuck in her ways, a bombastic braggard who belches (whyyyyyy….), and a tone-deaf hippie. Put them all together, and apparently you get a resolution, hahah! But seriously, that’s about as deep as I can get with this film. It just didn’t do anything for me…


    9. Iconic Shot
    It’s got to be that ridiculous map schtick. Nothing is as totally eyeroll as this contrived, goofy moment, which I think is sadly representative of the plot as whole.

    [​IMG]

    I guess I should say that it’s not a bad thing that the film doesn’t make sense, nor is it a bad thing to like it. It has its moments of comedy, and even a few good spots. But I think there’s a clear reason why its often on the bottom of the barrel when it comes to Disney films.


    10. Representative Pin
    Gonna go with this one:

    [​IMG]
    Pin 28886 Disney's Home on the Range (Movie Opening)

    It’s got the three main characters, the title, and the lasso frame. That’s about as good as it’s gonna get for me. XD


    Stray Thoughts
    --I was legitimately shocked with Rico was a double agent.

    --Buck’s happy squee/whinnie was probably the best part of the film. XD
     
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  9. pretty Omi

    pretty Omi Resident Smol Wolf

    Rating - 100%
    18   0   0

    This is my comfy place c:

    Also I love Buck’s happy whinny too haha



    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
     
  10. MerlinEmrys

    MerlinEmrys Hicitus Pinicus!

    Rating - 100%
    477   0   0

    It made me think of Sheldon XD

    [​IMG]

    Sent from my SM-G950U1 using Tapatalk
     
  11. MerlinEmrys

    MerlinEmrys Hicitus Pinicus!

    Rating - 100%
    477   0   0

    Aw crap, I thought this posted last night...

    Bambi 2 (Fair warning, this one gets personal!)

    1. Overall Impression
    I’m probably unique in this, and I am admittedly bringing a lot of my own baggage to this particular movie, but I think this is one of the best sequels, if not one of the better films in the surrounding few years. I liked it more than Brother Bear and even Emperor’s New Groove. There’s something about this movie that really connects with me, personally, so I freely admit that I’m bias in that reading. But I think this film has a lot of heart, which something like Home on the Range kind of lacked.

    Now, it does get to cheat a bit: it gets to bypass all the character establishment and exposition a stand-alone film has to accomplish as it assumes (rightly) that the audience is at least familiar with the original Bambi so it can just hop right into the action. Moreover, it sets out to cover a very small amount of time, so it doesn’t have to do a lot of worldbuilding or be overly concerned with the timeline. What I love about the film (and why I included it in the lineup) is that it returns to an earlier film and tries to fill in a rather glaring hole—Bambi’s growing up and dealing with his mother’s death. I’ve watched the film twice this year, and would probably watch it again at the drop of a hat because I find it very poignant (again, for me, personally).

    Overall, this film is touching <3


    2. Character Analysis / 8. Progressions
    What I love most about this film is that you can argue this film isn’t really about Bambi; it’s about the Great Prince, a character who had so little development in the original yet commanded a lot of attention from the plot. Moreover, the Great Prince’s development here is an interesting counter to early conceptions of masculinity and fatherhood (from 1942) to now.

    One of the Great Prince’s opening lines is his explanation to Friend Owl: “A Prince looks after the herd. The does look after the young.” This reminds me of the (now thankfully outdated) concept that in the hierarchy of the family, the children were the responsibility of the mother while the father’s sole task was to protect and provide for the family—to such an extreme that he would be absent from the child’s upbringing, as is the Great Prince in the original film. The frequent refrain of “A Prince does or does not X” may be a bit heavy handed, but it’s useful in establishing how the Great Prince has a clear dichotomy of (essentially) gender roles. Then, out of necessity and begrudgingly, he must take care of Bambi.

    Naturally, this sets up the “bonding” montage later and culminates in the awkward exchange of where the Great Prince wants to keep Bambi despite having asked Friend Owl to find a doe to take care of Bambi. But we get that heartbreaking backpedal where the Great Prince returns to that third-person, cold, distant refrain: “A Prince should not be raising a child.” This is heartbreaking because we just went through an entire montage demonstrating that a Prince certainly should be part of his son’s upbringing—as it’s healthy for both the child and the father. He even “whoo-hoo’ed”!!!

    This leads to the (admittedly on the nose) moment were he thinks Bambi is dead. The audience, of course, knows Bambi survives, but the Great Prince’s reaction is pure heartbreak (and is my main point for why this movie is about him, not Bambi). He tries to get Bambi to stand up by returning to that refrain, “A Prince does not---” but then breaks off and just goes to him and cries holy crap I’m crying he’s crying we’re all crying geebus. That breaking off the refrain is so perfect, because it doesn’t just show the Great Prince’s emotion, but shows that he’s abandoning that rigid structure and just embracing what he actually wants to do, which is show affection (and mourn) his son. The film rewards this by Bambi being alive, hooray!!

    The strength of this film is that it so touchingly (for me) shows how concepts and interpretations of fatherhood have changed over the years. The old-guard of the cold, distant, authoritative father figure melts away in favor of someone who is involved and attentive and now commands respect because we want to make him proud because he’s as much a friend as he is a father.

    Without getting too personal, that’s the opposite of what happened between me and my father. He was the distant type who, despite saying he was proud of me, never had any involvement with me, my interests, or my accomplishments beyond the mandatory graduation appearances, birthday cards, etc. He was certainly part of that old-guard, so it’s refreshing and uplifting to see Disney, in a way, redeem a character who was part of that structure in the original and show how powerful that redemption can be here in the sequel.


    3. Scene Analysis
    And while I’ve just provided a mountain of reasons why I love this movie, let me tell you about something I really didn’t like about it (beyond the rando pop music and Thumper’s sisters, hahah!). Ronno fills a weirdly necessary role as antagonist here—which is fine. But it’s the method of his bullying that bothers me so much. His first jab is at Bambi’s name, “Isn’t that a girl’s name?”, and continues to mock Bambi for any perceived effeminate behavior with that stupid baby talk. This bullying suggests anything effeminate is immediately weak—which is a personal pet peeve of mine. It’s a side effect of those gender roles upheld by the Great Prince’s refrain from the beginning of the film.

    But notice what happens with Ronno. He spends the whole film razzing Bambi about being a sissy, then he gets bitten by a turtle and goes running and calling for his mother! Hahah! Look at him! He’s not so tough! He’s crying for his mamma! He was a sissy all along! Wait. See what happened? The thing Ronno was calling out as weakness in Bambi, which we the audience knew wasn’t true, is now perceived as weakness in Ronno and the audience supports it. I don’t like to toss around hot-button phrases like this much, but this is the definition of toxic masculinity. There is nothing wrong with a kid running for his mother when he gets hurt, but society reads that as effeminate and thus weakness in boys. And while the film takes strides to prove that’s not the case with Bambi, it turns right around and does the same thing to Ronno.

    Also, total side note, can we just appreciate how this sequel is trying to mirror the original? It’s perfect with the Ronno encounter:

    [​IMG]

    (4. Song Analysis)
    Not an analysis, but the musical songs in this film are really jarring. The creators tried so hard to keep the spirit of the original, but man the songs didn’t get the memo, hahah! Admittedly, the lyrics to “There is Life”, while a bit on the nose and cliché, are good enough for me to forgive them. XD


    6. Dialog Analysis
    Oh my gosh, I’ve written so much. Time to speed this up.

    Bambi’s comment before he goes into “Bravery” training with Thumper resonates with me sooooo much: “I guess I’m not what a Prince’s son is supposed to be…”

    OH GOODNESS I’M BALLING AT A DISNEY SEQUEL…. But dude, that’s my childhood right there. I was not at all what my father expected out of a son. I wasn’t athletic, I read books all the time and played video games, I played with models and toys and collected Pokemon cards… And even though my father passed away before I came out, I lived with that crushing fear of how he would react if he knew I was gay. The beauty of this line is that we know, because this is a midquel, that Bambi grows up to be an excellent Prince of the Forest, so we know that he is exactly what he’s supposed to be. But that moment of self doubt is so touching for me. (Same reason why I love teenage Herc so much.)


    9. Iconic Shot
    I have two choices here. The first one is more of a goof, but it was my favorite moment in the film, when the Great Prince gives Bambi a raspberry:

    [​IMG]

    A beautiful father-son moment. XD And a great progression for the Great Prince!

    But more seriously, right there at the end of the film where the Great Prince say something like, “I was a lot like you…” So we end with that great connection between Bambi and the Great Prince, and I love the look on both of their faces:

    [​IMG]


    10. Representative Pin
    I think I like this one most:

    [​IMG]
    Pin 11013 Disney Auctions - Bambi and Great Prince (60th Anniversary)

    Bambi looking up to his father. I thought about the sad one (100787), but I think this film is more uplifting.
     
  12. MerlinEmrys

    MerlinEmrys Hicitus Pinicus!

    Rating - 100%
    477   0   0

    [​IMG] [​IMG]
    Chicken Little (2005) and Meet the Robinsons (2007)

    Monday/Tuesday is our "wrap-up" discussion on Home on the Range and Bambi 2. So you're welcome to respond to other analyses throughout the day.

    However, you may not post any more full analyses for Home on the Range and Bambi 2 to count for completion toward the 52 Challenge. No late homework. ;P

    ~Merlin
     
  13. pretty Omi

    pretty Omi Resident Smol Wolf

    Rating - 100%
    18   0   0

    Lol how did nobody pick the single pin that was actually made for this movie? :p
    [​IMG]
    Pin 45311 DLRP - Bambi 2

    Also damn Merlin, I got a little misty eyed reading all of that!
     
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  14. unibear

    unibear DPF Charter Member DPF Charter Member

    Rating - 100%
    51   0   0

    I appreciate that "Bambi 2" hit a resonant chord for you, Merlin. But even after seeing your write-up, I still can't help but think "Bambi 2" is trying to do something half-a$$sed that's already been done pretty well by other movies around or before this time.

    But now I feel obligated to put up the meme:



    So nothing really gets to be new. I get that, but if you're going to rehash established story lines I feel like you have to bring something new to it, and I just don't feel like "Bambi 2" did that... Of course, I suppose, that's just my opinion and others are very welcome to theirs!

    EDIT: Oh, and Merlin, I assume you meant that you were BAWLING at a Disney sequel, because the other connotation is just too disturbing to think about...
     
  15. unibear

    unibear DPF Charter Member DPF Charter Member

    Rating - 100%
    51   0   0

    Well, I see that my dread over having to watch this movie was justified. Yet another bad movie in the second Disney Dark Ages…

    1. and 8. My overall impression of the movie… Several things:

    OK, I find this movie forgettable and cringe-worthy at the same time. Just as with “Bambi II”, this movie is riddled with so many clichés and stereotypes. Unlike B2, this movie also seemed to go full out in the over-the-top clichés and going for the very most unsubtle versions of these clichés that is not worthy of any movie, but especially not a Disney movie.

    Examples: Starting with the very first scene of the movie (this could be #3, but I’m going to do another scene there) just overdoses on the over-the-top animal clichés/cheap jokes including:
    • Dogs at the diner drinking from a bowl—I mean if they wear clothes and sit at a booth, why can’t they drink water from a glass?
    • Mother rabbit with a baby in a stroller. When she steals the baby from the stroller (twice in the same scene), we get a “paper-doll” style line of over a dozen rabbits. Did YOU know that rabbits have a lot of babies? NEVER heard THAT before…
    • Dogs all sticking their heads out of the car while THEY are driving
    • Another clothed animal using a clothed goat wheelbarrow-style as a lawn mower
    • Bird continually running into shop window instead of going in the door
    • Runt of the Litter is actually the largest animal, trying to break our expectations, but that, in and of itself, makes it a cliché…
    • Outfielder dog chasing his tail instead of watching the ball
    • Outfielder bull grazing on grass instead of watching the ball

    There were also non-animal clichés/cheap jokes that were really over the top and completely unsubtle, including:
    • Big metal sphere breaks through theater screen at EXACTLY the same time Indiana Jones is being chased by huge boulder in “Raiders of the Lost Ark” (and a nod to the old WDW ride?)
    • The whole story is YET ANOTHER tired example of the main character being an outsider/loser that must redeem himself to become loved by the city and his father. Ugh!
    • The trope of popular vs. unpopular appears in SEVERAL movies, but this one unsubtly calls it out for what it is: Popular vs. unpopular for the dodgeball game
    • Cliché of geek/nonathletic son not knowing sports—son promises he will smack the baseball in for a touchdown
    • Cliché of sports training montage highlighting Foxy Loxy as the sports star and Chicken Little as the loser—enough said
    • Cliché of sports loser winning the big game (see #3)
    • Really fat guy (Runt) gets stuck in the small escape hole and his friends much jump up and down on his head to push him through
    • Of course the soda machine won’t take Runt’s dollar bill and keeps spitting it out. Never heard that before!

    Clichés/stolen jokes tied to other Disney films
    • The opening steals from “Lion King” for an iconic opening, and then rips on previous Disney movies for opening with a book. In interest of full disclosure, I have to admit that I also ripped on said movies for using the book trope.
    • Cars smashed by said big metal sphere play “Mickey Mouse theme” on horns as they are crushed
    • Chicken Little uses flower stalk to climb up to ‘walk’ button (stolen from “Mulan”)
    • The cliché of the star athlete and popular father having a nerd/geek son and he is embarrassed by it. The main arch of the story, but incredibly cliché (stolen partially from “Bambi II”, including the initial discomfort between father and son, awkward moments early in the movie, son impresses father with physical prowess, everything becomes better, father tells kid he loves him, happy ending, etc. etc. etc.).
    • School counselor telling father that his loser son is “not like you at all.” Wow, that’s coming from a counselor! I can’t believe I’m saying this, but B2 handled it better, by using the exact quote but opposite at the end of the movie, with the Prince telling Bambi that he IS a lot like him.
    • Foxy Loxy as the stereotypical mean girl (see #2), very similar to/stolen from Ronno in “Bambi II”
    • The aliens in their suits look an AWFUL lot like Doris from “Meet the Robinsons”
    • The assumption that a map with X’s over several planets does NOT necessarily mean they are planning to (or did) blow up the planets. This gets to the whole “Brother Bear” notion that we DON’T always know what other creatures are thinking about/the whole aliens as invaders vs. aliens as rescue squad
    • The burp jokes as Runt fall/rolls feels like “Home on the Range” ’s obsession with burping
    • Blowfish gets in car crash, and blows up (stolen from “Finding Nemo”?)
    • The whole acorn obsession comes Bucky the squirrel in "Emperor's New Groove"

    Examples of poor writing/convenient plot points:
    • What are the odds of the same panel hitting the same character two years in a row?
    • How did the glow stick get caught and stay with the ship? If the panel had caught the stick, it would have shattered and leaked out; otherwise, the panel had to catch the fish’s fin! Ouch!
    • How did Chicken Little and friends get in the sealed spaceship?
    • Why would ringing a bell mess with the alien’s heads?
    • Of course, the alien ship magically disappears before anyone else can see it. They even use a shiny penny to distract them. UGH!
    • The movie never really explains WHY the whole sky of this city consists of huge metal hexagons projecting a sky image. WTF??
    • After the nice and tidy wrap-up of the father and son’s relationship, Chicken Little gets a little bit of courage and kisses Abby Mallard, complete with her raising her leg during the kiss

    One example of resisting the cliché (sort of): After ringing the bell for the aliens, and nobody seeing the ship or the aliens (which IS a cliché), Chicken Little begs his father to believe him this time: “You’ve got to believe me.” The response WASN’T the cliché I was expecting (“of course I do”); instead he said: “No, son. I don’t.” Totally unexpected, but also heart-breaking! Of course, after the confrontation the father changes 180° and buys into EVERYTHING his son says, you know, because he’s supposed to now…

    And the Hands-Down Worst Disney Line Goes To:
    OK, I said last week that HotR gets this award for the udder/boob joke. Still probably the worst. But having said that, this quote was definitely in the running, and incredibly cringe-worthy:
    “Hey, remember when that icy blue stuff fell from the sky? Everybody thought it was from space and stuff? And it just turned out to be frozen pee from a jet airplane.”
    “Yeah, that's right. It's frozen pee. Yeah. It's frozen pee. Pee, pee, pee, pee pee.”
    “Could you stop saying that?”
    “What? Pee? Pee. Tinkle? Piddle? Wee-wee? Whiz? Make pishee?”

    And the Bad Taste Award in a Disney Movie Goes To…
    This film for playing REM’s “End of the World as We Know It… And I Feel Fine” during the alien invasion with the townsfolk running for their lives! Double Ugh!

    OK, in all seriousness, I am forced to wonder: Was the whole aliens/invasion part of this movie really needed? I could have seen the movie move on from Chicken Little’s baseball triumph into him learning what that means for him: Is he popular now? Does everyone forgive him? It is a real (or temporary) forgiveness? If he becomes popular how does his relationship with his father/Abby and his unpopular friends change? (this one could run into cliché territory, but it’s not like we’re not there already). Did Chicken Little really need a double redemption in the movie?? And then we can ask, if two redemptions are unnecessary do we get rid of the baseball redemption or the alien redemption? I don’t know.

    (continued)
     
    Last edited: Nov 4, 2018
  16. unibear

    unibear DPF Charter Member DPF Charter Member

    Rating - 100%
    51   0   0

    2. OK, I’ve already written a lot, so I’m going to go a bit shorter from now on. The character I chose to analyze was Foxy Loxy. She is the prototypical popular mean girl. She’s part of the popular clique, and uses dodgeballs and one of her weird friends to punish the unpopular kids. She’s also the sport star of the baseball team, and lives for the limelight given to the popular and athletes. She also has a real problem dealing with the fact that Chicken Little’s admittedly lucky hit made him the star. Even towards the end, we see that she has had no redemption and throws a rock at the aliens and is “vaporized”. When she is actually returned, she apparently had her brain scrambled and is now nice. So the only redemption she has is because she was damaged by the aliens. Not especially satisfying, I must say…


    3. The sequence I chose to analyze was the final inning of the baseball game. This movie plays to the ultimate cliché of a sports-related movie. The final part of the game all comes down to the underdog/sports loser. They even play up all of the most unsubtle examples of the cliché: The loser can barely lift the bat, everyone around him is telling him not to swing (not to try, not to be the hero, just take the walk and let someone else be the hero—I’ll bet Foxy Loxy was next up to bat!). Of course, the loser refuses to not try to be the hero and all looks lost. I mean, two strikes, because there’s no tension unless there are two strikes. Then the cliché of the really weak loser actually hitting the ball with perfunctory slow-motion speed! The ball makes it to outfield, and the good players are miraculously bad! Who knew? Of course, the loser runs the wrong way, because he’s never seen a game or watched at practice for a game he supposedly loves. Then, of course, there HAS to be the showdown at home plate. And all is lost because the outfielders FINALLY charge to the plate with the ball and tag him out. The town is devastated and Chicken Little’s reputation as a loser is cemented for all time. BUT WAIT! The umpire sweeps off the buried plate and we see Chicken Little’s foot is on the plate. So, now he’s SAFE! And all is right in the world again, and now Chicken Little is a hero and Foxy Loxy is a nothing! Never seen this in a movie before; must be the first time the underdog wins the big game despite all odds!


    4. I really don’t like the introduction of already-established pop songs into this movie. It feels very un-Disney like, and much more like “Shrek” or other non-Disney movies. The song I chose to analyze was “All I Know”, the song playing when father and son both get home after the “sky is falling” event and both are sad. While the lyrics are pretty good, the images are just a bit too… I’m tired of saying cliché, so how about “recycled”—from every other movie that tries to tell the story of the father and son who don’t click easily. Then, of course, we find out that Chicken Little’s mom is gone (presumably dead) and the father is struggling to take on the “female” role of caretaker to the child (didn’t we just DO this in “Bambi II”??). It’s an OK song, and better than the pop tunes, but I feel like we already get that the father-son relationship is strained and I don’t need a mopey song to tell me that…


    6. The line I chose to analyze came from the sports announcer at the baseball game: “This excitement isn't about the fun of baseball, the prize. It's about the gloating and rubbing their noses in it, the ‘Na-na-na-na-na! We beat you!’ taunting that comes with the winning.” I just felt like this over-the-top unsubtle non-funny comment that might be true but SHOULDN’T be true pretty much sums up this movie, and why I don’t like it.


    7. As with “Bambi II” this movie is all about a broken father-son relationship that eventually gets healed. And while I didn’t particularly care for B2, this film makes me appreciate that there was SOME subtlety and storytelling going on in that film. Here is a quote from the alien father in this movie: “But, hey, I'm a dad. You know how it is with your kids. When they need ya, you do whatever it takes.” Pretty on the nose and unsubtle…


    9. OK, I’m tired of this review and this movie so I’m not going to try to find an iconic scene; I’ll stick with the pin.


    10. Ugh, I’m so uninspired by this movie because it’s so uninspired itself (OK, now I’m being unsubtle!). So, I went with the most non-descript pin I could find: the DSF marquee (42408).

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Nov 3, 2018
  17. Meritre

    Meritre Active Member

    Rating - 100%
    2   0   0

    I only remember that we all started to watch it together (family movie for saturday evening) and non os us could watch it untill the end so we stopped halfway and watched something else.
     
  18. unibear

    unibear DPF Charter Member DPF Charter Member

    Rating - 100%
    51   0   0

    This review took me so long because I too had to stop watching and take a break several times during the film. I'm more hopeful about "Meet the Robinsons", since I've already seen it.
     
  19. timeerkat

    timeerkat Your Friend Who Likes To Play

    Rating - 100%
    256   0   0

    So...I watched them both, gonna need to put my thoughts together on them for my writeups.
     
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  20. unibear

    unibear DPF Charter Member DPF Charter Member

    Rating - 100%
    51   0   0

    OK, this movie was a lot more fun to watch than “Chicken Little”.

    1. My overall impression of the movie… Several things:

    The animation style for this movie and “Chicken Little” both feel a lot like Pixar and their 3-D animation format, and I have to admit that I have trouble remembering whether “Meet the Robinsons” is a Disney film or a Pixar film.

    As you can see below, I found several similarities between this movie and “Chicken Little”, but that could just be because I watched them so closely in sequence (and that I’m getting tired of doing analyses…). Still, what I find to be largely negative aspects in CL do not bother me near as much in the film, and contrary to many of the films of this timeframe, I find this movie to be lots of fun. Not a really good movie, but enjoyable and at this point, I’ll take it.

    I love that Lewis’s distinctive hair hasn’t changed, and that became a plot point in the future and forced Lewis to wear a Carmen Miranda hat! The first time I saw young Lewis, I thought he looked just like Alton Brown from “Good Eats”.

    A couple of minor plot point issues:
    • Why wasn’t Lewis adopted as a baby? It should have been pretty easy to place an infant with an adopted family. I’m just saying…
    • When Lewis was working on his memory device, I question the likelihood that he would have had access to a university performing cutting-edge brain research or a medical operating room with an observation room. Also, where did he get the $$ to buy all of the electronics needed for his device (on an orphan’s salary, no less…).


    2. I guess I’ll focus on the Bowler Hat Guy. From the initial part of the film, it becomes pretty clear that he’s a rather ineffective and less-than-bright villain. It takes a bit more time to realize that he’s a patsy for Doris, the real villain. BHG’s advice to little Goob (the anti-“Frozen” advice of “Don’t let it go. Let it fester and boil.”—Which would have been a much worse song…) hints at his story. When he tells his life story to a young Lewis (which every villain, especially the less-bright ones, HAS to do), we see that Goob never let go his anger and hatred about losing the game. Then, all of a sudden, BHG’s arrested development makes sense—he is still living in the past, focusing his attention on how things didn’t go well and letting it fester. His whole reason for being has also focused on punishing Lewis instead of moving on and living his life; as such, he has no real goals for himself and has nothing to live for after Doris—and with her, his ability to punish Lewis—is gone. We never see that happens to BHG at the end of the movie, but there is hope that his life did dramatically change after his game-winning catch.


    3. The sequence I chose to analyze was when young Lewis met the Robinsons. This scene is filled with weird and eccentric characters; some of my favorites include Uncles Spike and Dmitri in the pots, Aunt Billie and Uncle Gaston, Uncle Art (Batman!) as a pizza delivery guy, and Frannie and the singing frogs. The whole scene of meeting the family and then eventually having dinner with the family shows that the whole family is nuts! But it’s a good kind of nuts. Everyone is weird and different and it doesn’t matter because they’re a family and love each other. It’s a nice message of the future and rather inspiring given that there are several people in the real world in the current day who seem to view differences (different races, religions, sexes, sexual orientations, etc.) as a reason to separate and hate and not a reason to understand and love. OK, perhaps I’m reading too much in to this, but it was pretty nice to see people who have real differences still interacting with love and fun and kindness.


    5. As many time-travel movies do, this movie has several symbols that are placed in the story the might not seem like they mean anything, but we find out later are important hidden clues. The first one that becomes apparent is the PB&J gun. When the family introduces the PB&J gun at the dinner table, this is the time that Lewis (and many in the audience) recognizes that this family is actually HIS family. I also thought about analyzing the symbolism of adult Frannie with the singing frogs (compared to young Frannie at the science fair), adult BHG with the red Radio Flyer wagon as he took the invention from the science fair, etc. etc. etc.


    6. This answer is very related to #3. OK, the movie hits the whole “Keep Moving Forward” with the subtlety of a sledgehammer, so I think I’m going to ignore it! The line I chose to analyze came from adult Frannie when Wilbur says, “We really have to go.” Her response—“No. No, you don’t.”—was very similar to what Chicken Little’s father said to him after CL begged him to believe him—“No, son. I don’t.” So, same words but totally different intent (and why I like MtR over CL, hands down). CL’s dad’s response showed that their family wasn’t all that loving or healthy for either one (dad is embarrassed by son, son feels unloved and unvalued by dad). In contrast, the Robinson’s family is weird and crazy and totally loving! Nobody is being judged, everyone is loved, and the family has more than enough love and understanding for a new member. Very cool, and a direct contrast to CL.


    7. Again, I think the animators view the goal of this movie is to push the “Keep Moving Forward” mantra, hard and heavy. So, again, I will ignore it. The lesson I got from this movie (and I think that Lewis did too!) is that there are always consequences (sometimes unintended) for your actions and you must take responsibility for them. Goob/BHG did not learn this lesson as a kid and it ruined his life and set him on the path for revenge. I think Lewis took something from that, and I think that led him to the decision NOT to meet his mother. If he met her and got her to keep him, his life would have changed irreparably (he wouldn’t meet Frannie or have his future family, he might not even have become an inventor, etc.). He also took responsibility for keeping Goob up all night (and unintentionally ruining his life by making him fall asleep in outfield), abandoning his invention and his chance for a better life temporarily to go and wake up Goob in the outfield. Only then did he focus on himself and his future. This was a short scene but I’m glad the writers put it in there to show that Lewis had grown as a result of this whole time-travel process (since it never seemed to occur to him in the past about not keeping Goob up all night).


    8. This movie has several similarities to other Disney movies/ideas. These include:
    • The movie makes it clear at the very end that the “Keep Moving Forward” mantra in the movie came from a quote from Walt Disney about the future.
    • This movie and “Chicken Little” are both rather unsubtle, CL for its not always (ever) effective humor and cheap jokes and MtR for its obvious and continual hitting the audience over the head with the whole “Keep Moving Forward” sentiment.
    • OK, Doris looks just like the aliens in their spacegear from “Chicken Little”. (And Lizzy looks just like Wednesday Addams, even though that’s not a Disney movie).
    • As Wilbur brings Lewis to the future, we see the people movers and a sign that says “Todayland” right in front of a building that looks just like Space Mountain (obvious references to Tomorrowland in WDW MK).
    • The “Don’t Let It Go” from Bowler Hat Guy sets the stage for Elsa’s musical rebuttal in “Frozen”.
    • The whole Goob’s life being based on and defined by winning or losing a baseball game feels similar to Chicken Little and his fixation on winning the baseball game.
    • All of the little Dorises attacking the time machine as Lewis was going to the past felt a lot like the buzzer droids that tried to destroy Obi-Wan and Anakin’s ships in Star Wars I (II?).


    9. I thought of two ideas as iconic shots for this film. The first was the end scene with Lewis and Cornelius talking about their future/past and their inventions. The second was where Lewis/Cornelius finally gets his family.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    10. OK, so what I loved about this movie was the absolutely weird but loving (and loveable) family. So, I went with this pin (53333) showing the family.

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Nov 4, 2018
  21. caw caw rawr

    caw caw rawr Squirrel!

    Rating - 100%
    49   0   0

    My kids love Little Chicken (so dubbed by my then 4 year old). I like it. It's not my favorite by any stretch but I enjoy watching it. Especially fun are the little cameos by famous peoples. :)

    As for Meet the Robinsons, I didn't know until this year that it's based on a children's book! Also, I would die for a Goob pin. Not Bowler Hat guy, but Goob. I love that kid.
    [​IMG]
     
    MerlinEmrys likes this.
  22. coblj003

    coblj003 DPF Charter Member DPF Correspondent

    Rating - 100%
    26   0   0

    It's been busy here, going to work on both today as it's the day off...
     
  23. timeerkat

    timeerkat Your Friend Who Likes To Play

    Rating - 100%
    256   0   0

    1. This is the second time I've seen Chicken Little, and that is enough for me. I don't think it's the worst Disney movie, but it's way down on the list for me.

    One of the criteria I use for judging whether or not I like a movie is whether I would want to live in that movie's world. And for Oakey Oaks, the answer is a resounding NO. The entire town has a very bitter attitude, it seems, and everyone is on high alert at all times. They freak out to the point of property damage about the alarm without finding out what's wrong first, then bully and shun Chicken Little (a YOUNG CHILD) so badly that his own father is embarrassed to be near him. They turn the small event into a book on tape, board game, movie, etc., retraumatizing him every time. Then when he tries to warn them again a year later (when he is still a YOUNG CHILD), they freak out AGAIN without finding out what's happening and bully and shun him some more. I think that the freak out scenes were meant to be funny, but it really does not come across that way. It just seems like a mean place to live.

    The movie relied heavily on animal puns - dogs drinking out of bowls instead of glasses, the chain of baby bunnies, the turkey getting easily distracted by something shiny - but it didn't strike me as particularly clever or a new take on anything.

    And I really disliked the way they handled Abby's character. She was a smart character who was friends with Chicken Little when almost no one was and was focused on helping to save the day until he kissed her and then...she just went goo-brained? Ok, I get if she does it for a moment for "comedy" sake, but she spent the rest of the alien invasion like that.

    I don't want to say that I hate the animation style since I don't actually *hate* it, but...the animation style really isn't my taste. The characters are so oddly proportioned and have a weird flatness to them, and a lot of the daylight scenes seems harshly lit. The exception is Fish - I thought his design was pretty clever and he is very expressive for being a fish.

    3. The sequence when Chicken Little is going to school at the start of the movie puts the world around him into perspective for us. His height and size presents a challenge for him (like when he had to get into a high window or when he got stuck to the ground by gum), but he is also resourceful - he uses soda bottles as rockets, he uses a coat hanger to unlock his locker from the inside, etc. The lack of surprise on his part about what happens tells us that these kinds of things are common in his life.

    The fast pace of the animation reflects how he has to move through the world to keep up with everyone else.

    The camera angle alternates between high shots looking down on him (how the world sees him) and low shots following behind or alongside him (how he sees the world).

    The song for this scene also introduces us to the musical theming of the film - mostly popular contemporary pop/rock songs. This is more reminiscent of Shrek than other Disney movies, which mostly use original music, and tells the audience that this is a modern-day story unlike many of the other Disney movies that are set in the past.


    7. Just like with Bambi 2, the big goal of this movie is for the father of the main character to learn how to be a father. But where Bambi 2 largely succeeded in this, Chicken Little fell flat. Buck Cluck was in Chicken Little's life all along (even though he keeps saying that Chicken Little's mother was the one who was good at parenting) and seemed more ill-equipped than the Great Prince who stepped in with no experience. Buck's approach to parenting seems to largely be "teach Chicken Little to blend in/become invisible so he doesn't embarrass me and my good name" as opposed to The Great Prince who was teaching Bambi from a genuinely good, if a bit misguided, place. Also, the Great Prince seemed to genuinely learn and change throughout the movie, whereas Buck is just less embarrassed by his son.


    9. I have a hard time finding anything "iconic" about this movie, so I just went with a shot of Chicken Little with his friends, since they were the only characters in the movie that didn't treat him like dirt just for existing.

    [​IMG]

    10. And here are his friends in pin form:

    [​IMG]
    Pin# 42522 - DisneyShopping.com - Chicken Little

    Random Thoughts

    ~ Do humans exist in this world? Cuz they were watching the actual Indiana Jones. Unless they meant it to be a commentary about how the animated animals were watching live action like real people watch animation? Or did they not have enough budget/time to reanimate the sequence using an animal in place of Indy? In any case, it was just confusing to see the clip of the actual movie in a world that we don't see any other humans in and brought me out of the film.

    ~ Funnily enough this movie shares two voice actors from other movies from either last week or this same week in this series - Patrick Stewart (The great Prince in Bambi 2 and Mr. Wollensworth in Chicken Little) and Adam West (Ace in Chicken Little and Uncle Art in Meet the Robinsons).
     
  24. timeerkat

    timeerkat Your Friend Who Likes To Play

    Rating - 100%
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    1. What a juxtapositon! Going from one of my least favorite Disney films to one of my favorite underrated ones in the same week. It was a nice palate cleanser - traveling from a world where everyone was mean and bitter to one where most everyone cared for each other and literally became each other's family.

    Meet the Robinsons is one of the films where I really wish it were more popular than it is. Not only is an enjoyable film, the humor lands really well and the serious scenes are really touching. You can really feel the emotion behind everyone's actions. The animation was really clean, and the characters were designed well. (And each character was unique! They had their own aesthetic to match their personality.) The voice acting is top notch, especially Lewis and Goob/Bowler Hat Guy.

    I like the twist of Bowler Hat Guy being Goob. I remember being genuinely surprised at that the first time I watched. Of note is that he becomes Bowler Hat Guy because of his resentment towards Lewis, and winds up being used by one of Lewis' inventions. Until the end when DOR-15 is destroyed and he goes off on his own, he is a creation of Lewis. I do wish the film showed us how he turned out in the future as Lewis grew up after going back to his own time.

    Tonally, it really reminded me of Emperor's New Groove. The storylines are different enough that I felt this didn't warrant being under number 8, but both films had such a nuanced humor mixed with more in-your-face humorous moments (over the top but in a fun way that adds to the film rather than detracts from it) and serious moments of character development in between.

    It's a bit of a stretch to think that the futuristic world could have been built in just a few decades, but I wasn't too bothered by that.

    (Also props to no one batting an eye at a grown man named Mary! They just accept his name as Mary.)


    5.
    [​IMG]

    Bowler Hat Guy/Goob's unicorn binder can seem to be just a joke for laughs - haha, the villain like pretty sparkly things! A grown man likes unicorns! - but it shows that deep down, he is really just a kid in an adult body. Due to the circumstances of his life, he was unable to mentally grow up to be a healthy adult. He is mentally stuck as a child since he was unable to move on from what he perceives is the moment his life was ruined when he was a kid. So it makes sense that he likes something designed for children. It also gives him a little bit of color and happiness in a largely dreary existence.

    7. The main goal is, of course, Keep Moving Forward. It's repeated many times throughout the film, and the end shot is a quote of Walt Disney that fades out to leave this phrase. But I think it's also important to talk about another message of the movie - that failure is something that should be celebrated. In our society, being perfect and successful is valued. Social media is designed in just a way that we can show off a perfect, edited version of ourselves. But failure and imperfection are just as, if not, more important.

    9. There are tons of striking visuals throughout the movie, but the thing that sticks in my brain above all else, is actually the very end screen.

    [​IMG]

    10. The film is largely about family, so I had to go with a pin of the Robinson family!

    [​IMG]

    Pin# 53333 - DSF - Disney's Meet The Robinsons - Family Portrait
     
    raikipins and Meritre like this.
  25. timeerkat

    timeerkat Your Friend Who Likes To Play

    Rating - 100%
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    Hopefully I can get myself back on track from now on! I own Bolt so I should be able to watch it in the next few days, and with any luck I'll be able to post that and Enchanted up before the end of the week.

    (Of course, the best laid plans of mice and men...)

    I'm so excited for Bolt week! :3
     
    MerlinEmrys, pretty Omi and coblj003 like this.

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