The Disney 52 Animated Challenge: Year-Long Activity - NOW PLAYING: Wreck-It Ralph AND Frozen

Discussion in 'DPF Game Room' started by MerlinEmrys, Dec 15, 2017.

  1. MerlinEmrys

    MerlinEmrys Hicitus Pinicus!

    Rating - 100%
    491   0   0

    (I would be lying if I said I didn't have a vested interest in this week's film XD

    But please don't feel like you have to like it. Lord know I have SEVERAL problems with it XD)

    Sent from my SM-G950U1 using Tapatalk
     
  2. slbrabham

    slbrabham Well-Known Member

    Rating - 100%
    38   0   0

    I'm going to paraphrase one of my favorite quotes. (It's by Kierkegaard.)
    SitS is not a problem to be solved, but a reality to be experienced.
     
    MerlinEmrys likes this.
  3. PixiePost

    PixiePost Previously SoraPandora

    Rating - 100%
    145   0   0

    Whoops.

    (WTH? I swear I posted this on another thread. Move along folks, nothing to see here.)

    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
     
    Last edited: Mar 25, 2018
    Meritre and MerlinEmrys like this.
  4. timeerkat

    timeerkat Your Friend Who Likes To Play

    Rating - 100%
    262   0   0

    *headdesk* Nooo, I was doing so well for so long there! I watched 101 Dalmatians on Friday night and went to bed right afterward, and then I was so focused on Wondercon this weekend that posting this on Saturday slipped my mind completely. I even realized as I was driving to pick up my friend this morning, but there was no opportunity for me to type everything out while I was at the con today (had to keep an eye on her very slippery two year old).

    I'm posting this just so I can say I posted something for every movie, even if it doesn't count for credit (unless I can invoke my one "oopsie too late" card? ;) )

    1. I really enjoyed this movie, though I am a little biased since I tend to prefer animal-centric movies overall (Lion King, Robin Hood, Zootopia, Bolt, etc.). The movie seemed to flow pretty well; there were a few spots where there seemed to be some filler (like the multiple times it cut to Roger lighting his pipe, Rolly repeatedly saying he's hungry, some of the Twilight Bark and chase scenes, etc.) but generally time was spent wisely. Horace and Jasper were a bit annoying, but there wasn't any one character that I was overly annoyed or upset at. It was a pretty standard and inoffensive kidnap and rescue film overall.

    I didn't notice so many specific animated sequences that were recycled from earlier works for this one, but I did notice a few times where the same animation was used within the movie or when a later movie took its animation from this one (for instance, Jasper getting knocked over the head is reused for Kay getting knocked over the head in Sword in the Stone).

    I love the vast variety of facial expressions going on in this film! Roger and Pongo are especially expressive. Disney seems to really improve on its character design from movie to movie, getting more intricate and detailed from one movie to the next.

    2. Cruella is an interesting character. Rather than her actions being motivated by revenge against a specific person, it's simple personal desire - she wanted a fur coat made of dalmatians, so to get enough fur she needed the puppies. She even tried to get them legally at first, and only resorted to dognapping once she was told no. (You can tell that she is not the type of person who is used to being told no; at first she dismissed roger and just offers him more money, but when he put his foot down she flew into a rage over it.)

    Her character design is amazing; very visually striking. She is very angular (those cheekbones could cut glass!), but she surrounds herself with her giant puffy round fur coat. She is literally surrounded by her obsession at all times, even when in bed. She is also surrounded by Devil symbolism; her last name is De Vil, her old manor is Hell Hall, she is usually surrounded by a cloud of smoke, the lining of her fur coat is red, and even her phone has a demon face on it:

    [​IMG]

    She is made to seem much older than she actually is (she certainly doesn't seem to be the same or very close in age to Anita, her old schoolmate). Her voice is deeper, her skin is sallow, she is more skeletal, etc. Unfortunately this plays into the trope of the evil older woman.

    [​IMG]

    She's one of the first villains we see with henchmen. Part of this could be to remove blame from herself (Horace and Jasper wouldn't be recognized by the Radcliffe's, and she didn't physically steal the puppies herself), but I believe that most of it is to avoid doing any of the dirty work herself.

    It also should be noted that the only full-length song in the entire movie is about her. (It is also one of the only villain songs to be song ABOUT the villain and not BY the villain).

    3. One of my favorite scenes in the entire film is the scene where Pongo is looking for a mate for Roger and sees all the dogs and their matching humans.

    [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG]

    It's a really lighthearted little scene, and highlights the strong relationship between humans and their dogs, to the point where they start to look and act alike. It uses visual humor to demonstrate this. Each pair starts as a wide shot where we can see both dog and owner, which gives us a great shot of the overall aesthetic of each pair, then it cuts to tight shots of the human and the dog so we can really see the similarities of each. The coloration, posture, and movement style of each is perfectly matched to a comical degree.

    We see most of these same pairs during the Twilight Bark, which serves to include them as an interconnected part of the city, rather than just a one-off sight gag.


    9. This film to me is primarily a film about family, and familiar love. The shot at the end, with all of the dogs surrounding Roger and Anita at the piano, is one of the most memorable shots in the film for me. Pongo and Perdita are rewarded for their courage and hard work by being reuinited with their puppies and their humans, and Roger and Anita take in the new puppies without a second thought simply out of love and the goodness of their hearts.

    [​IMG]

    10.

    [​IMG]
    Pin# 26433 - Disney Auctions - Giving Thanks (101 Dalmatians - Family)

    I think this pin does a great job in highlighting the theme of familial love.

    Random Thoughts

    ~ The 15 Radcliffe puppies were stolen, but the other 84 puppies were actually purchased legally from pet stores. Cruella could actually go after Roger and Anita for 84 counts of theft! It's unlikely that she would, since that would uncover the illegal activities on her end (and she would also probably have to admit why she had so many puppies), but I cant help but giggle at the thought of 101 Dalmatians 2: The Prolonged Court Battle for Puppy Custody.

    ~ How many dalmatians are around London and the surrounding areas where Cruella had access to 99 dalmatian puppies (84 from pet stores that would theoretically only have a few dalmatians at any one time) of roughly the same age?

    ~ One downside that saddens me about the movie is knowing that it caused a surge of dalmatian adoptions and then abandonments after people found out how much work they are. So many movies that feature animals have this problem (Jack Russels, chihuahuas, even clownfish after Nemo). This is one of the first that I know of to follow this trend, though.

    ~ Twilight Bark cameos I spotted:

    Jock
    [​IMG]

    Peg
    [​IMG]

    Bull
    [​IMG]

    Lady (running) and Tramp (on top of car)
    [​IMG]
     
    pretty Omi, MerlinEmrys and coblj003 like this.
  5. MerlinEmrys

    MerlinEmrys Hicitus Pinicus!

    Rating - 100%
    491   0   0

    @timeerkat I will allow the invocation of the one "I'm Late!" card. ;) <3

    Sent from my SM-G950U1 using Tapatalk
     
    pincrazy and timeerkat like this.
  6. timeerkat

    timeerkat Your Friend Who Likes To Play

    Rating - 100%
    262   0   0

    Phwew! Thanks! Now I just have to be careful the rest of the year. ;)
     
    MerlinEmrys likes this.
  7. MerlinEmrys

    MerlinEmrys Hicitus Pinicus!

    Rating - 100%
    491   0   0

    After a horrifically stressful week, I am so so so excited to watch my namesake movie tomorrow. :D
     
    pincrazy, Meritre and sbmpins like this.
  8. Counselor

    Counselor Active Member

    Rating - 100%
    8   0   0

    Like you, I have a bit of a routing interest in this film. It, RH and Pinoccio are the three that I watched many times as a boy and are films I watch to this day and enjoy for various new and fun reasons. Can't wait for discussion time ... Hopefully, with my crazy ass schedule I will not miss it :)


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
     
    MerlinEmrys likes this.
  9. Meritre

    Meritre Active Member

    Rating - 100%
    2   0   0

    I just started to watch the movie (for the first time ever) and I already know Merlin is my favourite :)
    Beware, I'm going to, plan to haunt the special chat on Sunday. :) (also for the first time)
     
    MerlinEmrys likes this.
  10. slbrabham

    slbrabham Well-Known Member

    Rating - 100%
    38   0   0

    The chats are great. It's always fun.
     
    Meritre likes this.
  11. xdattax

    xdattax Well-Known Member

    Rating - 100%
    58   0   0

    1. What is your overall impression of the film?

    Well, first of all, this was the first time seeing this film. I went and looked in the cabinet to see if I had it, and shock and surprise, I didn’t! So, after a quick check to the MPLS I found that the library closest to me had a copy of it. I’m pretty sure it had never been viewed before, as the DVD was in pristine condition.

    Overall, I enjoyed the movie. It had a scratchy feel to the animation, but it was endearing, not annoying. It was bright and colorfully animated. The movie had, to use a tumblr phrase, pure cinnamon bun feeling about it. Wart was not angry or mad at his lot in life, he was a sweet kid who stumbled upon his fairy godfather, opposite of Cinderella who had her FGM come to her. Merlin and Archimedes were funny and worthwhile characters, especially with Merlin’s references to the future.

    2. Choose one specific character to analyze.

    Ector was setup as the baddie here, but he wasn’t really a villain. He was portrayed as short, fat, unkind, and ignorant, though for a moment, he tries to convince us that he adopted Wart. He is an opportunist (but then again, in mediaeval times through even modern courtly behavior, who isn’t?) looking to improve his standing by putting his son on the throne. He really didn’t treat Wart too poorly, though he was overly quick to punish him for slights. His ignorance showed though, when he accused Merlin of black magic. Merlin, you can come set the dishes and mops and brooms to work for me any day! However, in the end he did not fight Wart becoming Arthur, king of England, he accepted it and probably figured he’d end up alright in it all.

    3. Choose one specific scene or sequence to analyze—tell me what response is it trying to evoke from the viewer and how does it go about getting that response?

    The Merlin/Mim fight scene! How fun and cute! I enjoyed the transformations, showing how powerful the two characters were. The color coding kept Mim pink and Merlin blue right until Mim hits a loophole in the rules. No dragons? No, no PINK dragons. Purple dragons are obviously acceptable. It’s even possible dragons are purple, since Wart implies that fighting dragons is a knightly duty. Mim might not have even cheated, to be honest. Merlin didn’t disappear, though it looked like he did, she too may have become teeny tiny. The scene was supposed to be the big fight, but it just added humor to the movie. Like Ector, Mim was supposed to be the bag guy, but she really wasn’t, at least not in this version of the movie. She was more chaotic neutral. She enjoyed being bad as a point of who she was, so to her there was no moral issue destroying bird-Wart. She functions on a different moral plane than Merlin and sees no problem with her behavior. If she was truly evil, Merlin probably would have not accepted such a challenge, as he even states his magic is more for learning and good, not destruction.

    5. Choose one specific symbol in the film to analyze.

    Oh, that sword. The sword is a symbol of power and the divine right to rule, yet only lets loose when a child pulls it. Wart only grabbed it because he needed a sword for Kay, not because he wanted to be the King of the Britons. Thus, the idea that someone selfless needed to be king, not any one who wanted it. Since the sword appeared from heaven, is noted as miraculous in the movie, it is then an act of god that Arthur is to be king.


    7. What is this film’s overall goal?

    The goal overall was to show the meek shall inherit the earth in a way. The innocent, meek Wart becomes King Arthur because he is meek and innocent. There was an overt Christian feel to the movie, Kay is even set up as a sort of Cain character, saying he was not Wart’s keeper. The movie kept mentioning that the strong preyed upon the weak, showing humans as well as animals doing so. The difference though, is that humans have a choice, while animals it is instinct for a hawk to swoop down upon a smaller, prey bird.

    Sorry for it being short and sweet, and no pictures. At work, so can't really mess around too much with it.
     
    pincrazy and coblj003 like this.
  12. coblj003

    coblj003 DPF Charter Member DPF Correspondent

    Rating - 100%
    26   0   0

    [​IMG]
    And here we are in the final animated feature released before Walt's passing. This film would mark another occurance of strict budgeting for the studio using the xerox process as well as the animated debut of songs by the Sherman Brothers. While it did well in the box office, it is largerly seen as a passable if forgettable movie in comparison to the earlier films from that era.

    1. Overall Impression
    [​IMG]
    If 101 Dalmatians was Disney's poster child in cost cutting, Sword in the Stone would be it's antithesis in showing that you can only go so far before the cracks start showing. This is the first Disney that directly employed only one director(one of the 9 old men, Wolfgang Reithman)down from three from the previous film; He would go on to singly direct the next few animated films after Walt's death. As what started in it's predecessor, the S&tS copies/reused animation to a noticeable degree such as Sir Kay noticing you eating the same meat several times as well as the several scenes copied directly from Bambi and 101 Dalmatians.

    [​IMG]
    The beginning starts out brightly detailed like Sleeping Beauty, but the remainder of the film seems to employ the scratchy xerox effect along with a heavy use of dark and earthy(muddy) background colors contrasted only by pops of color of the characters themselves. The Music is wonderfully done by George Brun and is noted as the first animated film to showcase songs by the Sherman brothers(Mary Poppins), though it isn't quite remembered as much as their future works.

    [​IMG]
    As epic and dark as the intro makes out the setting of medieval England to be, it overall seems horribly mundane; there is literally no excitement of doing daily chores and tasks that sir Ector and Kay give to Arthur while the dangerous wolf is for better or worse comedic effect. Though the plot itself is bare, the excitement arises during the several small viginettes of Merlin showcasing Magic and trying to educate Arthur; Usually transforming animal forms to showcase the importance of using one's mind to overcome large obstacles, though he rarely succeeds at doing that except in the battle with Madam Mim.

    [​IMG]
    My biggest criticism of this film is the uneven treatment they gave in voicing Arthur, it just screams being cheap or not caring about the overall result. As the story goes, the original voice actor's voice broke due to puberty; rather then take the time to rerecord the entirety of his lines with another child actor, the director incorporated his two sons(yay for cost savings) to record lines not already recorded resulting in significantly wide arrange of voices throughout the film; several scenes even utilized all three voices at once.

    2. Character Analysis
    [​IMG]
    Madam Mim seems to excel as a wicked witch archetype. First showcased by Disney with the charcter Witch Hazel, WB's Chuck Jones would further it's own version(even reusing the same voice actress June Foray) in a series of Looney Toon shorts.
    [​IMG]
    Madam Mim seems to take on many of the characteristics of that particular character: grotesque perception of vanity, high pitch cackle, as well as having a beautiful version of herself, then ultimately being defeated by being outsmarted by her foe.
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    5. Symbolism
    [​IMG]
    Considering Disney's often conservative stance in previous films(black magic is evil) until now, I have to chuckle that Disney would have an inconspicuous portrayal of fortune telling. While it looks like Madam Mim is playing a game of solitaire, card games then traditionally have their basis in cartomancy. According to this website, the three cards ultimately tell the plot of the movie:
    Knave of Hearts - Close friend or happy, fair headed younger person.
    Five of Spades - Expect interference in your happy home. Reversals of fortune that will be resolved.
    Four of Diamonds - Inheritance. Finances improve.

    A fair haired youth's troubled home life will resolve itself by an inheritance...


    7. Film's overall goal
    [​IMG]
    As biblically inclined that many past Disney films have been thus far, the film itself seems to be a retelling of the story of David. The high priest Samuel(Merlin) listens to God and finds an unlikely shepherd boy David(Arthur) that would help defeat a larger foe Goliath as well become the future king of Israel. In that story, it is also taught that it was David's brains, not brawn that helped defeat his foe, a trait that Merlin repeatedly tries to teach Arthur.

    8. Connections
    [​IMG]
    The moment where Wart is kneeling in the kitchen amongst the broken dishes is very reminiscent of Cinderella. With the light shining on behind him in the dark and dreary room, he looks defeated as his dream of becoming a squire was extinguished by Sir Ector and Kay as was Cinderella's dream of attending a ball was also seemingly extinguished. Also fitting as this also marked by the arrival/reappearance of the Fairy Godmother/Merlin respectively.
    [​IMG]


    9. Iconic Scene
    [​IMG]
    While any other scene from this film tends is just a memorable viginette, this particular scene(well 2nd) is what truly marks the beginning of the Arthurian tale, how a young boy is somehow able to overcome the obstacle of retrieving an invaluable object that would choose him as king over the kingdom of Camelot. The light shining over him is what artistically marks him as ruler as if divinely chosen by God himself.


    10. Representative Pin
    Pin 27142 DLR - Sword in the Stone 40th Anniversary with Wart, Arthur, Archimedes.
    [​IMG]
    This is the best representative pin of Squire Arthur about to take the sword from the stone, the pinultimate scene from the film. What I like is that if you look closely, it even manages to capture the shining light freckles in the background.




     
    Last edited: Mar 31, 2018
    MerlinEmrys and pincrazy like this.
  13. Meritre

    Meritre Active Member

    Rating - 100%
    2   0   0

    So... for the first time I’ll even attempt an analysis. Lots of enthusiasm and a bit of extra free time. Here is part 1:

    I have to point out that I watched it dubbed first then re-watched parts in English.

    1. What is your overall impression of the film? Some possible talking points include: what you did or did not like about it; what about the film has stuck with you; what did you find different on this viewing; how would modern audiences respond to this (for the older films)… The list goes on. Hahah!
    I watched it for the first time and I liked it a lot. That would usually mean that it aged quite well, if I weren’t in the habit of liking Disney movies that are not really popular compared to the others. But it gave me everything I expected: fun and a lesson I can agree with, that studying pays off and the question brains versus brute strength. (I think this will come back with Hercules, with a similar conclusion but a different point of view.)
    The art was similar to 101 Dalmatians and I like that rougher, slightly sketchy look.


    2. Choose one specific character to analyze. You can explore how a character acts, what they say, how they dress, etc. to explain what they may represent or their function and meaning in the narrative. Try to avoid obvious "plot" stuff (ex: the Evil Queen is a villain, so her purpose is to be bad...), but explore unique and specific elements about the character (ex: the EQ is surrounded by images of peacocks, further suggesting her obsession with vanity). You may also use these elements to explain why you connected or disconnected from the character.


    Merlin is an obvious choice. He is my favorite character because he funny, he has his flaws, but does things to help, to improve and with the best intentions. And he’s really smart and clever and wants to share it.

    I’m not sure when the picture of a ’typical Wizard’ was established but Merlin has everything: long white beard, a blue robe with a pointy wizards hat, he is wise, powerful but still very friendly. I would even add the name, Merlin. That was my idea of a wizard as a small child. Also he stands for the message the film gave me (I already mentioned that), studying pays off. He also has glasses and this is often associated with wise people, with those who read a lot and with teachers and Merlin is all three. (Not to mention he has an owl, another symbol of wisdom as a pet. I read somewhere that in the polish version Archimedes was turned into a female owl and named Minerva – the roman version of the Greek goddess Athena, goddess of wisdom (among other things))



    3. Choose one specific scene or sequence to analyze—tell me what response is it trying to evoke from the viewer and how does it go about getting that response? Your analysis could include the scene’s use of color, action, camera angles, music, character development, setting, backdrop, style, etc. If you can justify it with evidence from the scene, then it’s an analysis!
    The first scene after the prologue works with very few colors and even those are muted and have a greyish tint.
    The using of light is also very typical for setting the right mood for a scary forest, the ‘bad wolf’ is dark, with scary glowing red eyes, those are often associated with devils and evil creatures. (Lucifer from Cinderella also appeared as a shadow with glowing eyes – even if his were green)

    [​IMG]

    The dark branches and the whole scene resembles Snow Whites flight a bit, setting up some kind of dark and threatening mood, but Snow White running in the forest is a very dynamic scene, with lots of different angles, this one is more static, with slower movements and just a few different angles. The innocent little squirrel gets lots of light and the bird of prey is quite dark against the background.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    After seeing it we certainly agree with both the narrator, whose words “the strong preying on the week” are shown in that scene, and Merlin, who appears right after this scene, that this is a dark age. But Merlin’s words, just like his brighter colors, prove, that he isn’t talking about the same problems the narrator did.

    And at the very end of the movie, it’s really colorful, when the ‘Dark Age’ finally ends now that there is a king.

    [​IMG]



    4. Choose one song to analyze—tell me what response is it trying to evoke from the viewer and how does it go about getting that response? What purpose does this song have in the film and does it succeed in that purpose?
    That's What Makes the World Go Round is about learning but in a fun way and it is an important step on the way of learning. And music always helps remember things so I think it was a good idea of Merlin to put his teaching in a song. (And he does it again.) Apparently he succeeded as Wart was even singing it when he was back in the kitchen cleaning – he memorized it. The song is a happy one, indicating “See? Learning is not that difficult at all”. It also contains one of the films messages – learning and studying pays off.
    I guess the translations, I mean the good ones should evoke the same response from the viewer as the original – if it is possible. (I’m studying to become a translator and interpreter)
    The Hungarian titles meaning is: Opposites but they make a pair together
    It doesn’t have much to do with the original but it fits well with the scene and it is, just like the original, teaching things about the world.
    (When I looked up the original English title of the song, That's What Makes the World Go Round, I immediately thought of the song Money from Cabaret – Money makes the world go round. Cabaret came three years after this movie though so it couldn’t have influenced it.)



    5. Choose one specific symbol in the film to analyze. A symbol is typically something inanimate, an object, rather than a character. So don’t say “Brer Bear represents dumb people,” as that’s more of a character analysis than a symbol. Rather, think about specific objects (jewelry, clothing, houses, food, weapons, etc.) What does this symbol mean and how does that meaning impact the film?
    I choose the crown from the end of the film. A crown is usually associated with a king, with a ruler. I think here it stands for all the things we find hard to do but we know we must do and in Arthur’s case this happens to be being king. It keeps sliding over Arthurs eyes I think that means that he is not completely ready to be a king (the royal robe being too long for him indicates the same) but he pushes it back so he is willing to learn – despite the fact that he tries to flee. Merlin also puts the crown straight, meaning he is helping the new king on the way of becoming the king and leader he wants to be.
    The crowns main color is red, red can stand for royalty and for blood – the blood that was shed for the crown, as we know these were dark times and people fought against each other. The small green part could stand for the small hope the sword in the stone represented – the hope of finding a new king, as green is often associated with hope and rebirth. (spring) Those bright colors are quite the opposites of the earthy colors Warp had, showing how big a change this whole king thing is for him.
     
    pincrazy and coblj003 like this.
  14. Meritre

    Meritre Active Member

    Rating - 100%
    2   0   0

    Part 2:
    6. Choose a single line of dialog that you find to be the most significant/impactful line in the film and why. You can be a little loose with the “single line” bit, but let’s not go for Maleficent’s entire monologue to Philip... Rather, something like Stitch’s “This is my family. I found it all on my own. It’s little, and broken, but still good. Yeah – still good.” (brb weeping).
    “Works every time, just like magic”
    “Ez mindig beválik, mint a varázslat” – it says just what the original English one.
    I think Merlin doesn’t only mean that this trick of his works every time but that words, if used cleverly, are just like magic. (And that’s why I think the translation is great because it has this second meaning, too) So it is worth to learn to use them the right way. It also connects to another sentence he says: “Do not get this foolish idea that magic will not solve all the problems because it will not!” to be precise. Words can’t solve magically all problems but they have more power than we realize they have. And with education their power grow – and there we are again, education is worth the trouble.



    7. What is this film’s overall goal? Is it to teach a specific lesson (what is it) or get an emotional response (such as)? Or both? And how well or poorly does the film succeed in that goal? Be specific!
    I think this film is about showing that studying is worth it and is useful. Let’s face it, most kids are sometimes fed up with school and don’t see the point why they have to go there. This film tells them in their own ‘language’ that they should study and do their homework, for knowledge is power. The fight between Merlin and Madam Mim is a good example, where the wizard outwits his opponent. Or when he tricks his owl to do what he wants.



    8. What connections or progressions do you see in this film to past films? Example: how does Sleeping Beauty progress (or digress?) the princess archetype built in Cinderella? Be specific!
    It connect to quite a few earlier films with the book used for the opening, for example Snow White, Pinocchio, Sleeping Beauty.
    It is about a boy learning about life and in that way it is similar to Pinocchio but the two boys are very different. While Pinocchio does everything he shouldn’t but learns in the end from them, Wart listens to Merlin and thinks him great – only he didn’t act like Merlin expected him, continue to study, it seems Wart did not learn from what happened to him (thanks to Merlin who transformed him into various animals) and feels like he is in trouble in the end when he becomes king.
    Merlin is a bit like the Fairy Godmother from Cinderella, both have a blue robe and white hair and both help a poor little orphan who spends the better part of the day cleaning. Arthur rises up to become king just like Cinderella rose and became royalty. (Also they use some of the same magic words in hungarian)


    9. What is the iconic shot of the film? What single frame of animation do you find to be the most memorable and why? Post it! You can check out this link to find some great screencaps to help!
    Although the sword in the stone has quite limited time, it is in the title and the very thing that is the most well-known about Arthur. And he does so twice in the movie. So I choose the shot Arthur (and no longer Wart) pulling the sword out of the stone.
    [​IMG]



    10. What single pin do you think best represents this film for you? Why? Give us the pin number and post a picture!


    I choose this pin, because it shows the iconic pulling the sword from the stone moment but it also has Merlin, the most important helper the new king has and that he is going to help him even after he became king.

    Pin 16207

    [​IMG]

    Hm now that I’m reading it through and hunting for typos it all feels so dumb. I’m sorry, Professor, I’m still learning how to do it properly. And practice makes perfect, right? :)


    Stray thoughts: Madame Mim has pink and purple, two typically princess colors as main colors. Those are unexpected choices for a villain.

    There was a lot of reused animation in this one and quite a few parts were used later on from this movie.
     
    Last edited: Mar 31, 2018
  15. slbrabham

    slbrabham Well-Known Member

    Rating - 100%
    38   0   0

    @Meritre
    I enjoyed your analysis, especially your choice of quote. Words are powerful.
     
    Meritre likes this.
  16. Meritre

    Meritre Active Member

    Rating - 100%
    2   0   0

    Thank you, that really made my day!
     
    slbrabham likes this.
  17. unibear

    unibear DPF Charter Member DPF Charter Member

    Rating - 100%
    51   0   0

    Now we’re at the Sword in the Stone, another movie that opens with a book (like Sleeping Beauty).

    1. My overall impression of the movie… Several things:
    • The movie starts out saying that eventually the townsfolk forgot about the magic sword that would make its liberator the King of England—I find that doubtful…
    • It seems odd that Merlin didn’t recognize Wart as the future King of England. I get that he doesn’t know the future perfectly, but it seems hard to believe that he wouldn’t remember who freed the sword and became the king.
    • I like that Merlin uses his magic for educational purposes. Note, he didn’t say “only for good”, which allows him to cheat if he feels like it will help his cause along.
    • I wonder if Wart is dyslexic? When learning to write his letters from Archimedes, he distinctly wrote the F and G backwards.
    • The end sort of feels rushed. I mean, they get Wart to pull the sword out the stone and then he’s king… And the movie ends. Kind of rushed…


    2. I chose to analyze Madame Mim, because he’s the lone cat in this film. First off, she’s not very well developed as a character or as a villain. There doesn’t seem to be any thought or explanation given as to why she is evil. She arbitrarily decides to kill Wart as a bird because “Merlin sees good in him and that’s bad.” So, does she have a real animosity toward Merlin? It doesn’t seem like it. In fact, the Wizard Duel seems to be more a matter of Mim being bored rather than a true vendetta. Also, she makes up the rules for the duel and then disregards them. Why? Because she can, and she knows Merlin won’t? And why does Merlin follow these rules when she doesn’t? Merlin states earlier in the film that he plans to cheat and use magic (every trick in the book) to get Wart to follow his studies, so he’s not above breaking rules.

    All in all, the scene with Mim just seems like an excuse for fun animations, and not much more. Although, it does ultimately illustrate the main message of the film (or at least Merlin’s training of Wart)… More on that later.


    3. The scene I chose was the Wizard’s Duel (also described in #2 above). As I said above, the Wizard’s Duel was a chance for Merlin and Mim to match their magic (and their smarts) against each other. It doesn’t really feel like “life or death” even though Mim sounds like she’s trying to kill Merlin; in fact, it feels more like a game of cat and mouse (and tiger and dragon and crab and rhino etc. etc. etc.). Some of the transformations in response to his/her adversary are more ingenious than others—I like Merlin’s walrus as an example of something really big to squash Mim when he was small before, I like Merlin’s mouse in response to Mim’s elephant, and I like Merlin’s goat to push her over the edge of the cliff (especially when he had been called “an old goat” by the woman in the kitchen before). But perhaps the best transformation was Merlin into a germ, infecting Mim and ending the duel. It also illustrated Merlin’s main message to Wart throughout the film: “Knowledge and wisdom is the true power.”


    4. and 5. The song I chose to analyze was “That What Makes the World Go Round”, the song playing when Merlin and Wart are fish, and the symbol I chose to analyze was “the future”.

    The major goal of the song is to get Wart to accept that education is useful and that he should put aside his goals of being a squire to learn from him. The overall message in the song (and in his fight with the barracuda) is: Brain over brawn. He is somewhat successful in getting Wart to look past his fears and use his brains to escape from the barracuda (and catching him in the chain reminds me of Ariel catching the shark in the metal “anchor” thingy).

    This quote from the song is most telling of Merlin’s view of fate and Man’s ability to change it: “Don’t just wait, and trust to fate, and say that’s how it’s meant to be.” This is in stark contrast to Sleeping Beauty, which took a very fatalistic view of life and Man’s inability to change it. It’s also interesting that Merlin would have this view after seeing the future. It makes me wonder if he has visited the future several times and has seen it change based on the decisions made by humans.

    His view that the future can change is illustrated early in the film when he’s waiting for Wart to drop in and he’s talking to Archimedes. I forget what Archimedes asks Merlin, but his response was: “if all goes well”, which suggests that Merlin believes that the future can change based on circumstances. This caught my ear because Merlin is supposed to see the future, but he doesn’t seem to know exactly what’s going to happen. His view of the future matches Yoda’s view also: “Always in motion is the future,” and Merlin has many things in common with Yoda…


    6. The line I chose to analyze came from Merlin to Wart: “Don’t you get any foolish ideas that magic will solve all your problems… because it won’t.” Again, a very mature (and perhaps unexpected) view from a very powerful magical creature (also something Yoda might say to Luke). Having seen the future, Merlin can see many “magical” things based on technology that seem everyday to us (locomotives, planes, etc.). So, it’s not surprising that Merlin sees limits to magic. He also demonstrates his belief in that idea by using knowledge and wisdom (along with magic) to defeat Mim.


    8. This movie continues to build on (and recycle) previous motifs used in other Disney movies. These include:
    • The movie starts with the opening of a book, just like Sleeping Beauty.
    • Wart with his stepfather and stepbrother (and being assigned to perform menial cleaning tasks) only to be freed by a benevolent magical entity feels like a nod to Cinderella: “Clean the dishes, Cinderelly—I mean Wart.”
    • Bermuda Merlin = 'I’m going to Disneyland' Genie. Also, Merlin and Genie are very similar in that they use references to objects/cultural references that the other characters don’t understand (but we do).
    • Merlin skating on the water when he first meets Wart reminds me of Tinker Bell and Peter Pan skating on water in Peter Pan.
    • Snake Mim looks an awful lot like Kaa.


    9. I think most of us are going to agree that the most iconic scene is Wart pulling the sword from the Stone. (Wait—Stitch, King of the Britons?)
    [​IMG] [​IMG]

    10. I picked this pin (112167) because to me, this film seems to be all about the idea that “knowledge and wisdom are the true power”, and the best example of that is Merlin giving Mim a nasty disease, spots and all…
    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Mar 31, 2018
    pincrazy, Meritre and coblj003 like this.
  18. slbrabham

    slbrabham Well-Known Member

    Rating - 100%
    38   0   0

    Sword in the Stone Analysis

    1.) Overall Impression
    Three words summarized my impression of this film after watching it tonight - character over plot. This film possessed some interesting characters and intriguing ideas; but it lacked a cohesive plot. I enjoyed watching the film as much as I usually enjoy watching the film.

    The characters were memorable and enjoyable to watch. For example, Merlin spouted little pearls of wisdom to Wart during their adventures through jaunty tunes. He sang, danced, and used magic to show Wart the importance of education. (If only all teachers could use magic ....) Wart was endearing as he split his time from his duties of being a squire and the exciting adventures that Merlin promised. Wart was brave when he tried to defend Merlin's teachings to Sir Hector. His honest nature showed through when he didn't blame the kitchen incident solely on Merlin to save himself. Also, his reactions were realistic when he had the opportunity to travel to London as a squire. Archimedes showed real growth that surprised me during this viewing. Madam Mim acted as a foil for Merlin and his magic. The wizard duel scene showed the cleverness of both wizards and provided humor. Even Sir Ector and Kay provided comedic relief. Who didn't enjoy watching Kay getting thrown from his horse and thrown into the tower.

    The lack of plot proved problematic. Any of the scenes in the middle of the film could be shown in a different order with little impact on the film. The wolf chasing Wart at different times seemed repetitive and didn't add anything to the film.

    Other than the sword in the stone and the character's names, I don't know how much of this movie reflected the plot of T.H. White's novel and series.

    Side Thoughts or Random Musings:

    I have always felt that this film more than other films can be shown and enjoyed as smaller sequences without much explanation.

    I have shown this film to my fourth grade students during the state testing week in the afternoon after the test session.The students have usually laughed and enjoyed the film because it was new to them and silly at times. I have found that there's little to criticize in this movie like prejudices or stereotypes that some earlier films suffer with today.

    2.) Specific Character
    As I watched the film tonight, I realized Archimedes grew the most as a character. He was never a favorite character of mine in this movie, and I thought him distracting before this viewing. (I don't even have a pin of him by himself so I must not have liked him.). But my opinion of him changed.

    Initially Archimedes did not care for Wart, and he made his feelings clear at the cottage that he wanted no part of the adventure. However, as Archimedes spent time with Wart, his feelings toward Wart changed. During the sequence when Merlin and Wart were fish, Archimedes tried to save or help Wart while Merlin wanted Wart to save himself. When Merlin turned Wart into a sparrow, Archimedes volunteered to teach Wart about flying because he felt he knew best as he was a bird. During his instruction, Archimedes tried to save Wart from the hawk and went for Merlin when Wart fell in Mim's cottage. Archimedes understood that Wart's future was in Wart's hands. As much as Merlin wanted Wart to realize that education was the key to his future, Merlin couldn't make Wart give up his dream of being a squire. When Wart told Merlin that he wanted to travel with Kay as his squire, Merlin left Wart while Archimedes remained. Archimedes even traveled to London with Wart and tried to help him. Archimedes became a friend to Wart when Wart needed support.

    Merlin acted as Wart's teacher or tutor and felt that he knew best for Wart. When Wart chose a path different than the path Merlin thought best, Merlin became furious and left. I have always liked the character of Merlin because he epitomized the struggles of being a teacher.

    8.) Connections or Progressions
    The character of Wart had some similarities to the character of Pinocchio. Both are young males visited by magical beings in blue who must transverse different adventures (or trials). The character of Wart reminded me of Mickey Mouse in the Sorcerer's Apprentice when he dressed in the red squire's robe. The robes were both oversized and showed the unpreparedness of each.

    Merlin's design reflected a simpler version of Yen Sid with both of them being older white men with long white beards. The blue-colored robes and pointed hat became synonymous with wizardry.

    9.) Iconic Scene
    The most iconic shot or scene is the famous scene of Wart pulling the sword from the stone and transforms from Wart (a bother) to a future king.
    [​IMG]

    10.) Representative Pin
    PP 126859
    [​IMG]
    This was a difficult choice between pins that reflected the iconic scene and pins that represented the characters. As I thought the characters were the best part of the film, I selected a pin with most of the characters.




    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
     
    pincrazy, Meritre and coblj003 like this.
  19. pincrazy

    pincrazy Well-Known Member

    Rating - 100%
    9   0   0

    Just finished watching, I better turn in before I fall asleep or i might miss cutoff.
    1) Overall impression, I enjoyed this film, entertaining, creative, and fun. No major negatives, artistically similar to Sleeping Beauty. The theme of the movie seemed to stress the importance of education.
    3) The scene sequence i picked is when Merlin turned Arthur into a fish. The scenery and animation recreated life in the water, it was beautifully done.
    4) Song selected was the introduction called The Legend of the Sword Stone. It started with the book, similar to other Disney films, and setup the story for the viewer through the song and pictures.
    5) The symbol seemed to be The Sword. It represented the promise of leadership, power, and royalty.
    10) Pin I chose #80058 of Arthur in Merlin's classroom represented Merlin's effort to show the importance of learning.
     
    coblj003 likes this.
  20. timeerkat

    timeerkat Your Friend Who Likes To Play

    Rating - 100%
    262   0   0

    YYYYEEEEESSSSS, Sword in the Stone! While not my favorite Disney movie, it's in my top ten. Growing up, whenever we'd visit my maternal grandparents, we would watch Secret of NIMH and Sword in the Stone, pretty much without fail. As a result, it's probably one of the movies I've seen the most. I haven't seen it in awhile, though, so it was great to have the chance to watch it again.

    1. Man, I missed this movie! It's just a fun fantastical fantasy film, and has some of my favorite individual scenes of any Disney movie (the Wizard's Duel and the squirrel scene, though that one just breaks my heart.) I love the art design (I've always had a thing for sketchy lines over super clean ones; it somehow makes an animated movie seem that much more animated to me.) And the characters are, for the most part, really diverse and interesting. (In fact, the only character that was mostly on the bland side for me was Wart himself, which wasn't helped by Disney's disservice regarding his voice casting.)

    One thing I noticed on this viewing versus when I was growing up was the lack of a major conflict. There are confrontations (Ector and Merlin, Wart and Mim, Merlin and Mim, etc.) but the biggest conflicts in the film seem to be nature versus Wart (the wolf and the barracuda). Similarly, the plot was a bit thin. There is the throughline of getting Arthur to London to pull the sword from the anvil, but it almost seems more like that was used as an excuse to use a grouping of scenes that show off Merlin's magic than the character's motivation.

    And the poor wolf! I know we're supposed to root against him, but I always feel so sorry for him when he puts in such a large amount of effort in exchange for being thwarted or physically assaulted.


    2. Though this story is on its surface about Wart and how he becomes king, Merlin is the real main character of the film. We are even introduced to Wart through Merlin's vision. The majority of actions in the film revolve around him, or are a result of his actions. Many of the cutaway scenes are focused on Merlin, mostly talking through his plans with Archimedes.

    Even though he is an all-powerful wizard, he does have his flaws. He is quick to frustration and anger, often taking it out on others who don't deserve it. He is convinced his viewpoints are right and comes up with plans to justify them, without thinking them through. He puts Wart's life in danger multiple times to teach him lessons, but is unwilling to intervene until it is almost too late. And he put Wart's interests on the back burner unless they also served his own purposes (and when Wart decides to become a squire - his ENTIRE LIFE'S AMBITION up until he meets Merlin - Merlin throws a temper tantrum and blasts himself away).

    He also uses his magic as a crutch sometimes. While his intentions are good (as is stated multiple times, he uses his magic only for "educational purposes"), there are times where he uses it simply to put sugar into tea or to scoot his chair forward. When teaching Wart his lessons, he mostly resorts to transforming him into various animals. And he enchants the entire kitchen just so he can drag Wart away to do more magic.

    Incidentally, he is responsible for my favorite single frame in the entire movie:

    [​IMG]



    4. I picked the opening song. The lyrics serve to set up the backstory of the film; many children watching the movie may not be familiar with the legend of King Arthur so the song gives context to the story. The choral music and slow vocals also match the time setting of the story more than the other, much more whimsical songs in the movie. As much as I love the Sherman Brothers' music, those songs contrast the story to a somewhat distracting degree.

    Plus, the sheer emotion and power of the singer during the line "And that miracle appeared, in London town!" gives me chills. It rivals the Disney Afternoon theme songs!



    9.
    [​IMG]

    While Wart pulling Excalibur out of the anvil is pretty iconic, ultimately for me this movie is about Merlin. One of his most dramatic scenes in the film is the Wizard's Duel. I chose this shot since it emphasizes a wonderful comparision between Merlin and Mim. While they both are very powerful, Merlin uses his magic for good. Mim, on the other hand, uses her magic to destroy others, and has no problem bending or breaking rules if it suits her purpose. (It should be noted that Merlin seems to be ok with this too. After all, he does tell Archimedes that he's ok with cheating as long as it's for a beneficial end. But he does play by the rules when it matters, such as during the Wizard Duel.))

    10. This might *technically* be cheating, but I choose this frame set as it encapsulates the Wizard's Duel perfectly :

    [​IMG]
    Pin# 24529 - WDW - Journey Through Time Pin Event 2003 (The Magic of Merlin & Mim) Framed Pin Set


    This isn't the most iconic pin, but it's my absolute favorite pin from my SiTS collection.

    [​IMG]
    Pin# 89190 - Disney Store Europe - Squirrels Wart and Red Head Valentine
     
    pincrazy, Meritre and coblj003 like this.
  21. MerlinEmrys

    MerlinEmrys Hicitus Pinicus!

    Rating - 100%
    491   0   0

    1. Overall Impression:
    I went into this movie a little nervous. You know how sometimes you really love something form your childhood, and then you watch it later only to realize that it really wasn’t that good and you only liked it for nostalgia? Well, that was me going into this. But thankfully, I thoroughly enjoyed myself and found the movie to be much better than my anxiety would have suggested. I seemed to remember it being episodic and disconnected, but with this watch I found everything to actually work really well together. Certainly there were some pacing issues, and you could tell in some spots where they came back after the fact to fix a scene’s conclusion, but overall I found it unified and solidly scaffolded.

    I watched the 50th Anniversary blu ray, which REALLY cleaned up the animation. I’m not totally sure that was a good thing, as the characters’ “scratchy” style seemed to compliment it solidly enough. But the colors and backgrounds were muuuuuuch better! No purple Merlin! :D

    Overall, I was absolutely enamored with the movie and really enjoyed myself. Even Russ found some points fun. So good job, SitS! You didn’t make me regret my main collection ;P


    2. Character Analysis:
    Who else could I analyze BUT Merlin!?! Merlin (both the Disney character and legend figure) has always had a special place in my heart—I think because he’s the kind of wizard I would want to be. As he says, “My magic is used more for educational purposes,” so I like to think of myself as a bit of a magical professor ;P

    But, back to the character. Merlin is so lovably bumbling that he just stands out as the most fleshed out character. Rather than being obnoxious like other similarly silly characters, Merlin’s actions were much more endearing, for example when he came back to apologize for mucking up Wart’s chances at being squire. But also, the blu ray had a deleted scene which explained some original ideas for Merlin and Archimedes—that Merlin lives backwards through time, and Archimedes lives forward. You can see this play out a lot, especially in the beginning scenes, as Merlin struggles with all of the “medieval mess” and Archimedes is hyper skeptical of Merlin’s “futuristic fiddlefaddle.” Considering this concept, their dynamic makes a lot more sense, and Merlin’s bumbling is all the more understandable—how frustrating would it be to watch conveniences disappear!?

    I also appreciate that he’s not this all powerful wizard character. For, as he says, “Don’t think that magic will solve all of your problems. Because it won’t!” He’s considers magic just a convenient advantage he has over the competition rather than a cure-all. And indeed, his magic more often causes trouble or puts them in life and death situations more than it really solves anything.

    But beyond anything else, I found Merlin to be the most expressive character so far (but that could be my bias talking). His range of emotion is impressive, his voice acting is absolutely superb, and his animation is just so freaking charming. I love him so…

    [​IMG]


    4. Song Analysis:
    I don’t remember liking the music in the film much beyond “Higitus Figitus”. But on this watch, I found myself really liking “That’s What Makes the World Go Round”. Some of the lyrics are really potent: “You must set your sights upon the heights / Don’t be a mediocrity / Don’t just wait and trust in fate / And say ‘that’s how it’s meant to be’ / It’s up to you how far you go”. I never realized how super important this song is in Wart’s development. The scene begins with Wart saying “I’m an orphan, and knights have to be of proper birth.” Later, when he becomes a squire, and Merlin is furious, he says, “What do you want from me? I’m a nobody!” So Wart is adamant that he isn’t actually worth anything beyond the lowest station, and Merlin’s whole deal is teaching him that he’s capable of so much more. And this song really drives that home. And, of course, we all know that he grows up to be King Arthur, so he’s destined for great things—but he has to be willing to go for it first.


    6. Dialog Analysis:
    This film is chock full of awesome dialog, so it was really hard for me to decide what to hone in on. But the dialog before the first “transformation” scene I found to be important. When Wart asked if Merlin could turn him into a fish, we get this bit: “Well do you have any imagination? Can you imagine yourself as a fish? [. . .] Then I believe my magic can do the rest!” In this way, Merlin’s magic is just an extension of Wart’s imagination, a conduit for that prime energy. We see the same thing happen again when Wart dreamily looks out the window and talks about his favorite dream of being a bird, and Merlin sneaks up to turn him into one. This positions Merlin’s magic as an outright counter to Mim’s. Hers destroys, while Merlin’s creates—but it does so using one’s creative, imaginative energy. I like to think that the magic wouldn’t work if it didn’t have that energy behind it.


    7. Overall Goal:
    I think it’s safe to say that the heart of this film is the importance of an education. I’m not sure if there were any politics behind that message, exactly, but it’s definitely a major aspect. Merlin’s adamant suggestion that education makes you better is at times quite heavy handed. And he definitely uses the same logic that got me into my higher degrees:

    Merlin: You need an education!
    Wart: What good will that do?
    Merlin: Well get it first, and then who knows!?

    Gets ya every time, man….


    8. Progression:
    Just wanted to put a quick pin in this idea about the storybook opening. This is one more of an illuminated manuscript, definitely thematically appropriate. But we see that bard sitting at the top, who will eventually become the more interactive Allan-a-Dale in Robin Hood. So wanted to keep an eye on that.

    [​IMG]


    9. Iconic Shot:
    Despite my love for Merlin, I think fewer scenes are as iconic as Wart leaning on tiptoe and touching the sword hilt.

    [​IMG]

    The light coming down, plus the heavenly chorus singing, just really adds a lot to this scene.


    10. Representative Pin:
    For once, “iconic” and “representative” are two different things for me! :D It took a little consideration, but I think this one nicely combines the professor/student dynamic, which Archimedes being middle man, and the chalkboard in the back suggests that progress.

    [​IMG]
    Pin 80058 Walt's Classic Collection - Sword in the Stone - Merlin Teaches Arthur Only

    I had also considered the Beloved Tale (78640), but since I don’t have that one in my collection, I didn’t choose it ;P Purely self-serving here. XD



    Spare thoughts:
    --I like how in the beginning of the film, every character expected Wart to fail, including the wolf, who just sat and waited for him to fall into his mouth. It sets up a really good basis for Wart’s growth.

    --Sugar Boy is such a solid minor character. XD
    [​IMG]

    --“Books are always first, you know.” Story of my life. XD
     
  22. pincrazy

    pincrazy Well-Known Member

    Rating - 100%
    9   0   0

    Hmmm, wondering where's Merlin's ? Finally catching up on reading everyone's this morning, so interesting to see everyone's viewpoints! :stitch:
     
    MerlinEmrys likes this.
  23. MerlinEmrys

    MerlinEmrys Hicitus Pinicus!

    Rating - 100%
    491   0   0

    I'm right before this comment. ;P

    Sent from my SM-G950U1 using Tapatalk
     
  24. MerlinEmrys

    MerlinEmrys Hicitus Pinicus!

    Rating - 100%
    491   0   0

    Last call for Sword in the Stone! :)

    Also a reminder we have the chat tonight at 7pm eastern! :)

    Sent from my SM-G950U1 using Tapatalk
     
  25. pincrazy

    pincrazy Well-Known Member

    Rating - 100%
    9   0   0

    Ugh sorry bout that, just saw, how did I miss? I'll blane it on my phone : p
     
    MerlinEmrys likes this.

Share This Page