The Disney 52 Animated Challenge: Year-Long Activity - NOW PLAYING: Wreck-It Ralph AND Frozen

Discussion in 'DPF Game Room' started by MerlinEmrys, Dec 15, 2017.

  1. MerlinEmrys

    MerlinEmrys Hicitus Pinicus!

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    Oh! I forgot to post this in my analysis! Did anyone catch the purple dragon in the opening credits? ;P

    [​IMG]

    I thought it was a neat little foreshadowing to Mim's "Did I say no purple dragons? Did I!?"
     
  2. watzshakinbacon

    watzshakinbacon B for Belle or B for bacon?

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    Dang! Missed another one. This time I blame it on getting sick. I still wanna watch since I haven’t seen sword in the stone in forever!!


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
     
  3. MerlinEmrys

    MerlinEmrys Hicitus Pinicus!

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    The weekly chat will be starting up shortly! Looking forward to the discussion! <3
     
  4. MerlinEmrys

    MerlinEmrys Hicitus Pinicus!

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    [​IMG]
    Mary Poppins (1964)

    Since I'm assuming most people least won't have the analysis completed by Monday, I am allowing Monday as a "wrap-up" discussion on Sword in the Stone. So you're welcome to respond to other analyses throughout the day.

    However, you may not post any more full analyses for Sword in the Stone to count for completion toward the 52 Challenge. No late homework. ;P

    ~Merlin
     
  5. pretty Omi

    pretty Omi Resident Smol Wolf

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  6. timeerkat

    timeerkat Your Friend Who Likes To Play

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    I wouldn't necessarily say he's dyslexic. He can't read or write, and given his situation in life I don't know if he's ever even seen the alphabet written out. This was probably his first time ever trying to write, so it's a bit premature to say dyslexic.
     
  7. Meritre

    Meritre Active Member

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    Hmm this seems to be a bit more than just a spoonful of sugar.


    I just would like to thank you all for a great evening/night chat, I enjoyed it very much and hope to hop in again soon! :)
    (It really gave me the feeling I'm "part of that world" and this means really much to me)
     
  8. MerlinEmrys

    MerlinEmrys Hicitus Pinicus!

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    Hey gang! I have yet another awesome announcement! Thanks to the incredible work of our resident artist, @AidanShepard , we now have a Participation Medal! :D

    [​IMG]

    So even if you complete just a single analysis over the course of the year, you'll get the Sorcerer Mickey Participation medal! :D Complete 26 or more analyses and you'll get the Participation and the Half-Completist! And complete 52 or more analyses and you'll get all three: Participation, Half-Completist, and Completist! :D

    These turned out so great! I really love them. :3 Thanks Aidan for all of your hard work! And I hope you guys enjoy a little more incentive ;) So feel free to hop on at any time!
     
  9. timeerkat

    timeerkat Your Friend Who Likes To Play

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    Awesome! I'm glad that there's something for people who join in every once in awhile, or want to start later in the year.
     
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  10. Meritre

    Meritre Active Member

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    Couldn't agree more :)
     
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  11. MerlinEmrys

    MerlinEmrys Hicitus Pinicus!

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    Indeed! I think it's a great addition. :D

    Sent from my SM-G950U1 using Tapatalk
     
  12. coblj003

    coblj003 DPF Charter Member DPF Correspondent

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    As I didn't get to participate in the last discussion, a few stray thoughts, forgive me for not posting earlier.

    What is with it with Disney's fascination of Magicians owning skulls?
    [​IMG]

    Merlin was definitely brought up un-Disney in pointing, I think only a Disney CM will understand this. By the way, I thought the sugar bowl was a cool animated tidbit that Disney would later bring back later(well sorta) for Beauty and the Beast.
    [​IMG]

    I know that this is only the 1960's and that Columbus Day has only been a federal holiday for a few decades, but I don't think Disney would've inserted this tidbit of discovering the New World (especially in a movie about medieval England) had they known of the PC fallout that surrounds the holiday today.

    [​IMG]

    As a nod to the Mary Poppins movie, which was in development at the same time as this, Archimedes pipes in about Wart being suitable for being as a chimney sweep. While the the job duty may have certainly been around, the profession didn't gain prominence until the 16th century when multiple chimneys in homes became more fashionable as well as the widespread use of coal for heating a century later requiring their frequent cleaning...
     
    Last edited: Apr 6, 2018
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  13. unibear

    unibear DPF Charter Member DPF Charter Member

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    Now that I’ve had my insulin shot, I’m ready to discuss Mary Poppins…

    1. My overall impression of the movie… Several things:

    First off, I never really liked this movie as a kid and haven’t seen it in over 30 years… This movie isn’t as saccharinely sweet as I remembered. Perhaps I was confusing it with “Sound of Music”, another Julie Andrews film I hated as a kid and have purposely avoided since that time…

    I know this movie won visual awards for mixing live action and animation, but it doesn’t feel like it has lasted the test of time. The “brightness level” of the animation and live action parts don’t really match too well and that makes it feel disjointed (especially on the carousel horses). However, I did like the penguin dance number; it reminded me of Gene Kelly dancing with Jerry—both are successes!

    I can’t help but compare it to “My Fair Lady”, which came out at the same time, competed with it for the movie awards, and both directly tied to Julie Andrews.
    • MFL has much better songs and none of them are boring or blah; about half of the songs in MP are memorable, the rest are really forgettable.
    • “Banks in Britian” = “I’m an Ordinary Man”, but MFL wins again because the character of Henry Higgins is more relatable/lovable than George Banks (more below).
    • Bedtime for the kids = bedtime for Eliza Doolittle, but “I Could Have Dancing All Night” scene wins hands-down.
    • Carousel horse race = horse race at the Ascot. And Mary’s and Eliza’s dresses seem similar (mostly white, with colored accents). I still think MFL wins here.
    • Sooty Mary Poppins = Dirty Eliza Doolittle. I mean, really! Did the MP writers think of ways to equate the two movies, as perhaps an FU to Jack Warner for not picking Julie Andrews? Seems like too much to be a coincidence…


    2. The character I chose to analyze was the father, George Banks. Wow, what a piece of work. He initially reminds me of the father from Peter Pan, except more so. This man is miserable, and I thoroughly disliked him from start to end. He never seems to listen when anyone else is talking (“The children are missing!” “Splendid! Splendid!") and seems to neglect the kids, even when he’s home. He seems distant and unloving to the kids and incredibly dismissive of the thoughts or feelings of his wife and kids (first ignoring or dismissing the kids’ employment advertisement and then tearing it up!).

    After hearing “British Bank” the first time and again in its reprise later in the film, I had the same thought. Father feels just like a low-budget version of Professor Henry Higgins singing “I’m an Ordinary Man” (“Let a child in your life, and you invite eternal strife!”). While both men are full of bluster and pig-headed ideas, unfortunately for Mary Poppins George Banks does not have the redeeming qualities that Professor Higgins has, and as a result I end up liking Professor Higgins and I still dislike the Mr. Banks even after the movie is over.

    Of all of the movies in the general genre of “let’s bring a nanny in to save the children that ends up saving the entire family”, the children in this movie seem the least offensive of all. They seem like perfectly well behaved children who show respect for their parents, who can’t seem to be bothered with them at all. At least the mother feels like she’s ignoring them for a good cause; the father just seems to be a deplorable human being and a stereotype of the father who comes home exhausted from work to sit and do nothing related to his family (which is why he puts up with a bad work situation!). It’s also incredibly annoying that the wife has to (??) continually kiss his behind, telling him that all of his decisions are marvelous and wonderful and hinting that she could never be as brilliant as her husband (and from a suffragette of all people!).

    Later in the film, George is again rude to the children, saying that he hates cheerful, that he hates singing children, etc. etc. I made a note: “Why doesn’t he just leave?” He’s miserable, and he’s intent on making everyone else miserable as well. Even later in the film, George comes home from a bad day at work and takes it out on the children, planning to fire Mary Poppins because the kids are having too good of a time! Wow…

    The bank scene was hard to watch. Perhaps it was meant to rationalize George’s behavior to show his work life, but I found myself really disliking him when he was basically willing to steal $$ from his kid to make his bosses happy. I know they needed the chaos at the bank to push the story forward, but it felt really unrealistic to think a comment by a child led to a run on the bank…

    The rest of this film is about George’s fall (insanity?), rebirth (thanks to guilt from Bert), and redemption (discussed more below in #3), but it’s too late and the damage is done. So, even at the end of the movie, I don’t like George and I don’t care about him or his “rebirth”. I think the movie tries to redeem him, but fails miserably to do so…

    EDIT: I just watched “Saving Mr. Banks” and it answered some of my questions about Mr. Banks, but the original movie never solved them and in the end this movie (made BY Disney) makes it seem like Travers was right to worry about Disney ruining her legacy, and that Disney just crapped all over her true love!


    3. The scenes I chose to analyze were Bert talking to the children after the bank, and the “Let’s go fly a kite” song (end). Bert tried to convince the children that their father really loved them, but they (and I) didn’t believe him. Bert thinks their father is caged in at work and should be pitied, somehow trying to suggest that keeping his feelings in and bottling up his frustrations is an admirable trait! When Bert says their father suffers “uncomplaining and silent” I burst out saying: “When was he EVER uncomplaining or silent?!?” The goal of this scene is to get the audience to see the father’s point of view, but I think it failed miserably. My thought was: “Why couldn’t Bert be their father? Perhaps the kids could run away with Mary Poppins and Bert and leave their ungrateful parents behind!” Not good for the movie…

    At the end, when George fixes the children’s kite and wants to play with them, I kept feeling that this was out-of-character for him. He lost his job and will probably lose the home but he doesn’t care. When the mother gives her suffragette banner as the tail and abandons her cause to join them, I thought: “Typical Disney ending, make the bad characters behave nice at the end, and all is well!” Just when I thought it couldn’t get worse (more happy and more out-of-character), the family sees all of the stuffy old bankers flying a kite, and they not only offer George his job back, but promote him to a partner—sure, make the person responsible for the run on the bank and the death of the founder a partner! That feels right! NOT! Again, the goal of this scene is to wrap up the movie and make them not need Mary Poppins. But I just don’t buy this redemption, and can imagine George being even worse to his family once he is a bank partner…


    4. and 6. The song I chose to analyze was “Spoonful of Sugar”, which is a rather catchy and memorable song in the movie, and the phrase I chose to analyze was “A spoonful of sugar makes the medicine go down.”

    The common vernacular idea of a “spoonful of sugar makes the medicine go down” is that you can use a bribe (something good) to make something distasteful (pun?) or disagreeable somewhat easier to bear.

    However, when Mary Poppins first sings it, it’s more about seeing the (existing) good or fun in an activity that changes your perspective of it from blah to fun. Not exactly the same idea, and the song/verses confused me, as I didn’t see it as particularly relevant to cleaning the nursery… I know this film won awards for visual technology, but it felt really hokey and dated. I guess that shows how far our visual techniques have come…

    In its reprise (“A man has dreams”) when George is blaming all of his troubles on the children and Mary Poppins, Bert uses the song to guilt George into valuing time spent with his children, which leads to an epiphany and the happy ending of the movie. Again, I don’t particularly see how a “spoonful of sugar” is apt here. Bert is talking more about treating his family with love and kindness, but is his family supposed to be the “medicine that goes down” that is helped by “the sugar”?? Not exactly a ringing endorsement of family (or marital) bliss. And, as such, this scene also seems to fall flat and remain unconvincing. I mean, the father starts out blaming everyone but himself for his troubles and then changes into a loving family man. I just don’t buy it…

    EDIT: “Saving Mr. Banks” attributes the “bitter pill to take” description of Mary Poppins from George to the Sherman brothers and Walt’s opinion of Mrs. Travers. Not exactly a wholesome image of Walt to share with the world…


    7. I suppose the goal of the movie (if you are to believe Walt in “Saving Mr. Banks”) is to introduce and endear Mary Poppins to its viewers. At least from my perspective, it failed pretty badly. I hated this movie as a kid! Now, after watching it again, I don’t hate it but I don’t particularly like it either…

    In common vernacular, the notion of Mary Poppins has become a saccharine-sweet character that can do no wrong. I definitely don’t see that in the movie! She’s very mercurial in the film, changing from nice to disagreeable and back. I felt that the song in the animated chalk painting about everybody loving Mary Poppins was over-the-top and cloyingly annoying (rhyme!); I kept thinking: “I don’t love her!”… She’s kind of rude and stand-offish when Bert tries to get the children into the chalk painting, saying “she doesn’t know what Bert is talking about” but then easily transfers them into the painting. Also, she’s kind of rude/cross to the children when it’s bedtime when they resist sleeping, denying that all of the wonderful things they did in the painting even happened. And finally hinting to the children that she didn’t really love them when she was leaving isn’t exactly endearing…

    Half-way through the film, I thought to myself: “Isn’t this over yet?” Not a good sign, and was COMPLETELY bored throughout the entire chimney sweep dance number. Ugh!

    EDIT: “Saving Mr. Banks” makes it clear Mrs. Travers did not like the idea of Mary Poppins being a musical or animated. Well, she lost major time on both of those ideas, and (sadly for her) those are two things that this movie is most known for!


    8. This movie continues to build on (and recycle) previous motifs used in other Disney movies. These include:
    • This is the 5th Disney movie set in London (6, if you count Alice in Wonderland along with Peter Pan, Lady and the Tramp, 101 Dalmatians, and Sword in the Stone). Disney must love him some London!
    • The whole blustery father with wonderful kids and a dutiful wife feels right out of “Peter Pan”
    • Is her magic carpet bag made from real magic carpets? Aladdin… NO!!
    • Disney movie heroine singing to a bird… Check.
    • Uncle Albert = Mad Hatter. Same actor, same insanity, and for crying out loud, it HAD to be a tea party didn’t it? It’s like you’re not even trying to be original…


    9. For me, the most iconic scene is the only scene I really liked in the movie: Bert dancing with the penguins.

    [​IMG]


    10. I picked this pin (59538) because to me, Casey at the Bat is a synonymous with “Swing and a miss”, and that’s how I feel about this movie. Ultimately, it was OK but it didn’t do anything for me and that’s the first time I’ve said that about a Disney movie…

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Apr 6, 2018
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  14. pins4twin

    pins4twin Well-Known Member

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    I recently read two of the Mary Poppins books, and she comes off as vain, rude and stand-offish. She doesn't treat the children particularly well, and I didn't understand why they revered her so much. The books I read did not have a straightforward plot, but were more a collection of incidents. The children are either with Mary, or follow Mary, and get involved in an adventure which Mary denies even happened, although there is always some evidence left behind.
     
  15. pretty Omi

    pretty Omi Resident Smol Wolf

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    Just wanted to point out that Lady and the Tramp does not take place in London, it takes place in New England, the Northeastern United States
     
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  16. unibear

    unibear DPF Charter Member DPF Charter Member

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    Then that makes it super weird that Peg, Bull, Lady, and Tramp appear as cameos in 101 Dalmatians, a movie clearly situated in London...
     
  17. coblj003

    coblj003 DPF Charter Member DPF Correspondent

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    It's more an Easter egg because the xerox process allows them to copy/reuse bits of stills and animation from previous films, you are going to see films from around this time period do a lot of that.
     
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  18. sbmpins

    sbmpins Pin Trader

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    1 - Mary poppins was one of my favorite films as a kid. We didn't watch very many of the animated Disney films but this was definitely part of our collection. I think what I really connected to as a kid where the songs and the fast pace of the film. I still think this is a fantastic movie. The visuals, the music and even many of the effects still hold up today.

    2 - A few years ago I saw the Broadway musical and I didn't really enjoy it. I found Mary poppins to be unlikable. However seeing the show prompted me to read the book. I liked her even less in the book! The fact that Julie Andrews was able to make this an endearing character amazes me. I never understood in the movie when they are in the nursery after the jolly holiday and Mary denies everything that happened. I thought it was just to make the kids go to sleep but in the other versions that disagreeableness shows in other parts of the story. It just doesn't make for a friendly character.

    4 - Sister Suffragete is a song that I know I didn't understand as a child. Tonight I really enjoyed the quote "though we adore men individually, we agree as a group they're rather stupid". While it is a funny line, I think it explains a large juxtaposition we see in Winifred. Nearly ever time she appears in the film she is headed to or coming from a march or protest for women's rights. However in the house, she is subservient to her husband at every turn. She even asks the staff to hide her votes for women ribbons because they upset her husband. It does make me wonder if her character was really driven to obtain the right to vote or just saw the protests as the cool thing to do in her extra time. She seems quite happy playing the role of dutiful housewife to her husband. I think the song played it's role in helping to explain a time period but I don't see that it was necessary to the story.

    6 - "Practically perfect people never allow sentiment to muddle their thinking." says Mary at the end if the film as the children are off to fly a kite with their father. Well, the first thing that came to mind when I considered this line was Spock; he would have said this if he were British. But back to this movie. Mr.Banks character flaw was his lack of sentiment. It was when Bert pointed out that he was too important and had priorities that couldn't be set aside for his kids that we see his change in character. He was missing the sentiment for his family. So was Mary saying Banks was perfect and he lost that?

    9 - my iconic shot is Mary flying over London. I think the paintings in this movie are breathtaking. And I learned on the making of segment of my DVD that these were doned on glass and he made holes so light could shine through and be brightened when needed, such as after the sun sets the lights in the houses getg brighter.

    [​IMG]

    10 - my pin represents the film, one of my favorite types of pins (characters dressed as characters), and a ride at Disney world that I very much will miss.

    [​IMG]

    Side notes -

    Weather-i know there is symbolism with it but I'm not good at explaining it. It's brought up often enough to almost be a character in the film. Every discussion with the Admiral is about weather - he even says there's a storm at #17 when they are fighting in the house at the beginnikng if ther movie. The wind brings Mary Poppins, when it changes, she leaves. Thee wind also clears out all of the other candidates for the nanny posting. Rain ends the Jolly Holiday and washes away the chalk drawings. Uncle Albert tells a joke about the weather changing and needing long underwear. "When the day is grey and ordinary, Mary makes the sun shine bright"

    It's funny how a movie can influence you without youh realizing it. I have 2 small dogs. When we go to the groomer or the store, I need them to hurry to get across the street. They have to go fast because their little legs don't cover much distance. When I want them to hurry I always say spit, spot. It was a while before I realized where they came from :)

    Sent from my SM-G950U using Tapatalk
     
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  19. timeerkat

    timeerkat Your Friend Who Likes To Play

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    1. This is a fun, whimsical movie. Nothing in it was that offensive or off putting (except for the red Indians line...), and the songs are very catchy and memorable for the most part. The use of color was effective (lots of muted colors in London, lots of bright colors when fantasy is taking place, such as when they are in the chalk drawing). The plot was fairly simple with a minor amount of conflict, but the movie still seemed a bit long. (I think it could have used about twenty to thirty fewer minutes.)

    It's a bit odd watching and enjoying the movie now that I know how P. L. Travers felt about her creation being used in such a way, though. Like, I want to really like it but I also want to acknowledge that the author had many disagreements about the direction of the movie. (And also how whitewashed Saving Mr. Banks was. Go figure that a movie created by the studio that produced Mary Poppins about the making of Mary Poppins would want to paint the company and Walt in as good a light as it could and skip over or change the bits that make them look bad...)

    It has a very strong musical theater vibe, with all of the reprises (SO MANY reprises!) I feel that some of the songs could have been cut or cut down, though the music varied adequately throughout (did I mention the reprises?) And there is a great deal of physical comedy, mainly through Bert. I feel that this was done to compensate for the lack of animation. It's easy in animation to exaggerate facial expressions, body movements, etc.; it's harder to do so with actual people, so their movements need to be larger and more emotional than normal to compensate.

    It was fun to see Ed Wynn as Uncle Albert. I wonder if the line towards the end about George being as mad as a March Hare was put in because of this casting choice.

    The use of green screen got quite distracting after awhile. I don't remember noticing it that much when I was younger, but it's used so heavily that it loses its appeal after awhile. There are also some scenes, especially Spoonful of Sugar when they are tidying up the nursery, where the image on the green screen doesn't seem to match up perfectly with the action in front of it. In particular, the dollhouse looks exceptionally big compared to Jane. (Though I FINALLY figured out how they pulled off the carpet bag trick!)


    5. The tuppence symbolizes adulthood. When George is trying to bring the children into his world of banking, Michael brings along his tuppence. He wants to use it to feed the birds, but George scoffs at this idea, thinking it to be a childish waste of money. When Michael is pressured by the bankers and his father to deposit it (grow up), he panics and grabs for his money. After the whole chimney sweep scene, Michael brings the tuppence to his father as a penance/peace offering, symbolically telling George that he is ready to grow up if it is needed. George brings the tuppence with him to face the bankers, but when he looks at them he realizes that this rejection of childhood is a harmful thing. He gives the tuppence to the bankers as he starts repeating all of the things that Jane and Michael have told him. This is him embracing some of the childhood qualities that he had firmly given up long ago.


    7. While some other previous films have focused on the importance of growing up,I feel like this film was meant to stress the importance of NOT growing up - or at least, not growing out of childlike qualities (imagination, for example). All of the qualities that George put into his advertisement are supremely important to him as an adult, and reflect that he wants his children to be treated as small adults rather than children (these qualities are reflected in their own advertisement). On all of the kids' adventures with Mary, they learn the importance of such qualities. This is attempted to be suppressed when George brings Jane and Michael to the bank without Mary, but it fails spectacularly. Only when George rejects the very adult world of banking that he was confined to, and connects with the children on their level by fixing their kite and going off to play with them, does he feel true happiness.


    9. This movie was harder for me to pin down one iconic shot, as so many scenes and images are brought to mind when you think of Mary Poppins. But one shot that I mainly noticed during this watch through was this:

    [​IMG]

    Boy, is this shot impactful! It's very ominous, something we haven't experienced in this movie up until now. George knows he is in trouble and is getting sacked, but this is still a intimidating setup. The one bright red circle reflects the bankers' anger with George, and the darkness surrounding them all is almost oppressive. It forces our attention to the bankers in the center of the circle, where the light is brightest, and highlights their importance. I give George credit for walking in to this room and approaching them; if it were me I might turn around and run out the door.


    10.
    [​IMG]

    Pin# 59869 - DisneyShopping.com - Dance Series - Bert & Penguins

    How very surprising, there isn't a pin of the bankers being creepy in a glowing circle in the bank. ;) I chose a pin from one of the most memorable songs from the movie - Jolly Holiday. I chose this pin of Bert and the penguins because I think that that scene is some of the best blending of live action with animation in the film, and some of the best physical comedy as well.
     
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  20. coblj003

    coblj003 DPF Charter Member DPF Correspondent

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    I'm getting off work a bit late today and have to run some early Sunday errands, hopefully I'll be able to post in the post when I get home in the afternoon...
     
  21. MerlinEmrys

    MerlinEmrys Hicitus Pinicus!

    Rating - 100%
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    1. Overall Impression:
    I knew I liked this movie, but I found myself smiling almost constantly throughout the entire thing. This movie is pure joy (bearing on overkill at times), and I think that’s most due because of the quiet chemistry between Bert and Mary Poppins. They so enjoy being together, and there’s no overt romantic connection (though there certainly could be), that it brings so much life to the film. I paid a lot more attention to the growth of Mr. Banks this time (certainly because of the recent Saving film), and I think that added a lot to the film’s body, gave it some meat. But the parts that stick with me most are certainly the magical ones with Mary Poppins (and I guess the children are there too……)


    2. Character Analysis:
    As pins4twins noted, this Mary Poppins is quite different than the one in the books. Disney certainly softened her sternness, quite to Travers’s dismay I’m sure, which in turn makes us focus more on her magic than her other negative traits (like vanity). The tipping point of Mary Poppins in this film is Julie Andrews’s smile—sometimes subtle and hidden when MP is trying to be stern, or out and proud on a Jolly Holiday:

    [​IMG]

    That kind of subtle dynamic, which is certainly attributed as well to the direction and film making (like just a shot of MP tapping her foot in “Step in Time”) does a lot for MP’s character. Without that, we get the overtly stern and vain woman who, while magical, doesn’t really give us that “sugar” feel.


    4. Song Analysis:
    I’ve got all of the Mary Poppins soundtrack on my car playlist, and I remember recently being startled by the lyrics of “Life I Lead,” so I made a note to use that for this analysis. This is Mr. Banks’s defining moment and gets echoed throughout the film. It’s all the more concerning, then, to see how he is defined. The casual chauvinism is something to take note of: “It's grand to be an Englishman in 1910 / King Edward's on the throne; / It's the age of men.” Queen Victoria died in 1901, so the Edwardian era is noted as this surge of (somewhat canned) machismo. Couple this with Mrs. Banks’s claims that “the cause [Votes for Women] so upsets him,” and he comes off as distinctly unlikable. Of course, I believe part of his character is that he doesn’t understand or realize the import of his words/actions/beliefs beyond his own person.

    We also get the following in “A British Bank”: “The children must be molded, shaped, and taught / That life's a looming battle to be faced and fought.” This is a terribly depressing outlook on life! And is an especially dark way to think of raising a child. Despite being a more “advanced” time, this concept is actually rather medieval. And perfectly encapsulates Mr. Banks’s character.


    6. Line Analysis:

    [​IMG]

    Not only what this a hysterical response, and one I employ frequently in my teaching (sarcasm XD, but I do think it often XD), but it exactly MP’s character. When she and the children return from their magical outings, MP denies it all (often with a smirk). She’s mysterious and aloof where her magic is concerned, as we also saw when Bert was trying to do some himself. In many ways, this makes us like her all the more—because to have an explanation would take away at least some of the magic.


    7. Overall Goal:
    If the overall goal for this film was warm fuzzies with a solid resolution, it more than succeeded. Certainly some aspects of the ending got wrapped up a little too nicely, but that’s just more of the same magic we’ve seen the whole time. In the wake of Saving Mr. Banks, I think more attention is placed now on his storyline whenever one watches the film, at least for me, which may detract a bit from Mary Poppin’s action. But, as she states, her job was done and done well, so it’s time for her to leave. As film whose got some of the most iconic music in Disney history, the music plus acting plus excellent writing really brings all of it together for an utter success.


    9. Iconic Shot:

    [​IMG]

    Few things are as quintessentially Mary Poppins as her flying in on her umbrella over Cherry Tree Lane. The entire atmosphere of the film changes. Before we’ve had some rando in a one-man-band, and a dude’s house that’s part ship and he fires his cannon at certain times? It’s all quite ridiculous. But as soon as MP arrives on her umbrella, it stops being weird and starts being magical. So this moment for me is really important.


    10. Representative Pin:

    [​IMG]
    Pin 116437 Mary Poppins - Practically Perfect in Every Way

    While there are certainly a few really good nominations for this, I really like the simplicity of this pin as well as the icon of Mary Poppins’s silhouette. And the “practically perfect” phrase really embodies this film for me.



    Stray Thoughts

    ---It bothers me just a little that when the Constable returns the children to their parents, he says “I’ve found some valuables, sir, that I think you may want.” Children as “valuables”? Struck me weird…

    ---Mary Poppins: The Queen of Sass
    [​IMG]

    ---The Fox swirling down the carousel pole is really good animation…
     
    Last edited: Apr 8, 2018
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  22. unibear

    unibear DPF Charter Member DPF Charter Member

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    It's fascinating that you would use this phrase in teaching. For me, this is a notion I try to RID my students of! This could be because I teach science and I WANT my students to know and understand the "how" and "why" of what has happened in the classroom. At least from my perspective, I don't believe that having an explanation takes away from the beauty and elegance of science. And the notion of magic in the science classroom (I don't know how it works, it's just magic) is something to be avoided in place of an explanation that can be used to predict future events and help us to understand why they happen.

    I'd like to hear how you use this phrase in your classes. Note: This is not a judgment or bashing; I'm genuinely interested in the context of this idea in your teaching. I realize the idea of "magic" isn't considered a bad thing in many fields, it's just that science isn't one of them...
     
  23. MerlinEmrys

    MerlinEmrys Hicitus Pinicus!

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    I was being SUPER sarcastic. XD

    I teach English comp; I have to explain literally everything. Hahah!

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  24. unibear

    unibear DPF Charter Member DPF Charter Member

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    OK. Sorry I missed that. Although I could see in an arts class or maybe music where you could use the term "magic" as something ephemeral or hard to explain/define. But you're right, the whole idea of "I never explain anything" is sort of the antithesis of teaching! It's right up there with "Because I told you so!"
     
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  25. MerlinEmrys

    MerlinEmrys Hicitus Pinicus!

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    Haha, no worries. I wasn't very clear, for sure. XD

    I will say, I'm always tempted to actually say it when a student asks me something I've gone over about 5 times already AND it's in the syllabus. That's when I want to be sassy. XD

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