The Disney 52 Animated Challenge: Year-Long Activity - NOW PLAYING: Wreck-It Ralph AND Frozen

Discussion in 'DPF Game Room' started by MerlinEmrys, Dec 15, 2017.

  1. timeerkat

    timeerkat Your Friend Who Likes To Play

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    [​IMG]

    1. Robin Hood week, oo de lally! This was actually the very first movie in the entire series that I already own! I've seen it so many times that I essentially have it memorized, but I watched it through again to look for things that I might miss on casual viewings.

    I don't think it comes as a great surprise to all y'all that this is one of my favorite movies, and Robin himself is one of my favorite characters. (He was actually one of the first crushes I can remember.) The songs are really catchy and memorable, and the characters are for the most part pretty likeable. It's one of the first to feature an all-animal cast (technically Bambi fits, because we don't actually see Man on screen, but humans exist in that world) and humanoid anthropomorphic animals, both of which appeal to me.

    Of note, this movie has a large percentage of bad guys compared to the others. It has Prince John and Sir Hiss, the Sheriff of Nottingham, and Nutsy and Trigger (they were more neutral, since they seem to just serve whoever is king a evidenced by them guarding PJ, Hiss, and Sheriff as prisoners, but they count as they worked for PJ for the majority of the film). If you add in characters such as Captain Crocodile and the rhino and elephant guards, the bad guys almost seem to outnumber the good ones.

    It does have its flaws, though. A great deal of it is recycled, both from other movies and within the movie itself. Back when it was first released it was probably a lot less noticeable (at least with the footage borrowed from other movies), since people didn't have access to the movies to rewatch all together like we've been doing. But the reuse of animation within the film was really noticeable and sometimes distracting. Additionally, the animation quality fluctuated within the movie. Sometimes it was sketchy, and sometimes the lines were crisp. The character animations seemed off for some of the characters sometimes, most noticeably for Mama Bunny in the jail cell. And the story cut around a bit too much sometimes. It was a buddy movie right up until we're introduced to Maid Marian and then all of a sudden Robin can only think of her. And the choice of which characters have British versus American accents was interesting. All the royalty-level characters were British (King Richard, Prince John, Marian, Hiss, and Klucky) as well as Robin and some of the side characters (like Mama Bunny and Otto), but most of the lower class characters and the villain lackeys all had American accents - and even those differed, such as the Sheriff's southern twang versus Skippy's more general accent. And the anachronism of the Happy Birthday song stood out to me, too.


    2. I'm going to go a bit off base with the new form of this question, but instead of focusing on one character I wanted to go over some of the characters' species and how stereotypical traits of that species are reflected in the characters themselves.

    Robin Hood - Foxes are, above all else, viewed as sly, cunning tricksters and thieves. These traits serve Robin well, as he comes up with various ways to pull a fast one on Prince John and rob him to redistribute the wealth back to the people of Nottingham.

    Little John - Bears are outgoing, strong creatures, just like Little John. They are also intelligent problem solvers, demonstrated by how quickly he can think on his feet.

    Klucky - Chickens are social animals, and Klucky is a very sociable character. They have a wide range of personalities; some are shy and gentle, while others can be quite outgoing and aggressive; this matches Klucky's blend of brashness and nurturing.

    As a note - Klucky is hands down one of my favorite side characters ever. GET IT, GIRL!

    Friar Tuck - He is generally gentle and kind to the citizens of Nottingham and Robin. However, when confronted by those who are abusing their power and making others suffer, that trademark badger temper comes out and he fights nearly to the death to protect what's important to him.

    Mama Bunny and the kids - First of all, rabbits are known for their ability to multiply, so it makes sense for Mama to have a large family. Additionally, rabbits are quick and clever, two traits that serve Skippy well as someone who looks up to Robin and acts somewhat as his protege.

    Prince John - As a flip to the other characters exemplifying their species' traits, Prince John is shown as the opposite. Lions are generally viewed as brave, strong, fierce, devoted to their pride, and regal. Prince John, on the other hand, is cowardly, weak, and willing to send his own brother away in order to take over the crown. This opposition to normal lion qualities is done to highlight the fact that he is the villain. (It's also in line with their trend of flamboyant and foppish "sissy villains" like Hook.)


    5. I chose Robin's hat.

    [​IMG]

    As Maid Marian said, "Only Robin Hood wears a hat like that!" The hat is a symbol of hope, in a time when the citizens of Nottingham have very little of it due to Prince John's awful rule. At the very beginning of the movie, Prince John's archers try to take out Robin Hood, shooting an arrow right through his hat and almost killing him (and the hope of the people along with it). Then, when Robin visits Skippy for his birthday, he gives him a bow and the hat off of his own head, showing him that even when his only farthing is taken, Robin will still be there for them. Later on, Maid Marian and Klucky recognize who Skippy is dressed as by the hat. Skippy proceeds to wear it through the entire movie, indicating that that spark of hope is still with the townsfolk.

    Through his many disguises, Robin wears different hats, but he always (or at least almost always; I'm unsure of the fortune teller costume since the first frame to last frame of that disguise he's still wearing the bandana) wears his own hat underneath.

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    9. There are so many scenes that I love from this movie that it was hard to pick. But one of the major themes of the movie is standing up against injustice, and the fight at the end of the archery scene demonstrates this perfectly.

    [​IMG]

    10. What single pin do you think best represents this film for you? Why? Give us the pin number and post a picture!

    This is almost a perfect recreation of the above:

    [​IMG]

    Pin# 84233 - JDS - 110th Legacy Collection - Robin Hood and Prince John (this is the LE110 version; there is also an LE250 version - pin 84138 - but may as well go for the harder to find one! ;) )


    It's not as representative, but I have to give props to my favorite non-fantasy mash-up pin (even slightly more than the Stitch invades pin series), featuring this week's -and- last week's movies! I was actually on the fence about using this for last week's representative pin, but decided to hold off to use it this week.

    [​IMG]

    Pin# 83849 - DSF - Disney Cats - Prince John & King Leonidas


    Random Thoughts

    Either more foxes and bears exist in this world that we aren't introduced to, Robin is AMAZING at disguises, or the other characters just have blinders on. As far as we can tell, Robin and Little John are the only bear and fox (aside from Marian) in this part of the world, and yet time and time again the other characters are VERY SURPRISED when they take off their costumes and reveal themselves.
     
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  2. timeerkat

    timeerkat Your Friend Who Likes To Play

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    I also have to say, Robin dressed as the stork is my #1 most wanted cosplay. I've been wanting to do that for YEAAAAAAARS, I just haven't figured out the logistics of functionality of wearing it and walking around in it all day in crowded spaces.
     
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  3. slbrabham

    slbrabham Well-Known Member

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    Robin Hood Analysis
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    1.) Humorous. Adventurous. Romantic.
    Robin Hood possessed elements of all three to make it a great underrated classic. I enjoyed the watching of the movie with one slight criticism or complaint. While I don't mind using voice actors from other films, the mix of very "western" accents with more "English" accents did cause me to roll my eyes. Little John's accent was tolerable, but the Sheriffs's accent made me think of old western movies. (I kept waiting for him to use the word varmint.)

    Using animated anthropomorphic animals to tell the tale of Robin Hood was inspired. The animators primarily relied on some classic tropes in characterizing specific roles. By making Robin Hood a fox, the viewer understood that he was sly. Sly doesn't have to be bad. In England, foxes in the hunt relied upon their smarts to evade death. The poor church mice, widowed Mrs. Bunny with all her kids, royal lions, and others relied on the established metaphors of their animal nature for part of their character development. For example, King Richard, as a lion, was the ruler of England like a lion is seen as the ruler of the savanna. The real life King Richard was known as King Richard, the Lionheart. Prince John, another lion, exemplified the cowardly lion trope. The rooster Allan-a-Dale as the ministrel opened the tale as a rooster heralds the start of a new day. Certain larger animals (rhino, elephant, and crocodile) were part of the guard. The Sheriff was a wolf who was portrayed as greedy.

    The story amused me as most of the previous tales did. The story of Robin Hood was not a new tale so the idea of animals as the characters was a new Spin in the familiar tale. I found myself laughing aloud at some of the antics that with humans might have appeared too silly. The choice to design the characters at animals helped the tale remain light hearted. The music had both a catchy tune Oo-De-Lally and the required live song for a romance, Love Goes On. The film appeared to hold up well in story and animation.

    2.) Robin Hood dressing as a Stork in the archery contest was deliberate by both the character and the production team. Storks signified numerous metaphors throughout history. Storks were seen as mostly harmless animals.

    By dressing as the clumsy Stork Robin Hood showed both his intelligence and his pride. Robin thought himself almost invincible as seen in the opening chase after the Oo-de-Lally song. Little John warned Robin of the dangers and Robin shrugged them off. Robin needed to enter the contest to prove himself the best (and maybe see Marian). He was smart enough to attended in disguise. The disguise of the Stork was inspired as no feared the Stork. Through Robin Hood's clumsy appearance and act that made him appear incapable of winning the contest, Robin showcased his intelligence.
    [​IMG]
    The fact that the animators selected the Stork could be seen as very deliberate, as well. Storks were used in the imagery of delivering babies to mothers so they were viewed as protectors of the week. Robin Hood protected the poor.

    5.) The crown was a symbol of rulership over England. Prince John even says, "This crown, this crown, gives me a sense of power." [​IMG]

    Prince John was not the King of England at the time of the tale, but he wanted to be ruler. He saw the trappings of rule, such as the crown, a symbol of power. He needed the symbols to strengthen his idea of rule because he did not have the support of others.

    When he was talking to Sir Hiss about the crown being a sign of power, the crown kept slipping from atop his head. [​IMG][​IMG]
    The crown did not fit because he did not have the right to rule. He had to position his ears in a particular way for the crown to fit. [​IMG]
    He manipulated the fit of the crown just as he manipulated others. From remarks from Sir Hiss, Prince John was responsible for King Richard leaving England for the crusade. Prince John wanted power (to be king), and he would do what he wanted and what he needed to become king. He needed the crown to feel powerful and look like a ruler.

    8.) Robin Hood had recycled animation from itself and previous films. Robin Hood possessed elements similar to earlier films. Robin Hood's voice cast contained actors from other films. Does this detract from the film? In my opinion, most of the repetition was pleasant. For example, the forest dance scene in Robin Hood and the Aristocats dance scene were identically choreographed. Did I enjoy both? Yes. As a child, I would not have noticed it (I would have been swooning). As an adult, I understood the need for this cost saving measure.

    I know we make comments in the repetition of books opening specific films. The book at the beginning of the film telegraphed the style of film to come for the early Walt Disney films. For established fairy or folk tales, the movies opened with image of the book. This imagery alluded to the works place in literature (or history). While Bambi, 101 Dalmatians, and Mary Poppins were based on books, as well. Those books were more contemporary with the production of the film. Peter Pan and Alice in Wonderland were based on works of literature but were more fantasy than fairytale. After Walt Disney's death, the films needed familiarity (or a sense of that Walt Disney would have approved) so they opened both the Jungle Book and Robin Hood with intro shots of books. It mimicked a device used from the early Disney animated films.

    My iconic shot was repetitive of earlier ideas, but it served an important purpose in the film.

    9.) Iconic Shot
    [​IMG]
    The just married scene was iconic to me for several reasons. The concept of the hero and heroine riding (or dancing) off together to live happily ever after was established in Snow White and continued in differing manners in earlier fairy tales. Robin Hood continued this concept providing a familiar ending that satisfied the audience by reassuring them that good won and received what they had earned. This type of ending provided another familiar element to earlier films that connected this film to Walt Disney's legacy.

    Finally, I like the sign "just married" on the back of the carriage. The sign was popularized in the 20th century and not part of 12th century England. This showed the animators using modern elements of the real world in the fairytale world. This type of mixing authentic period appropriate elements with modern pieces initially appeared in Sword in the Stone and continued here. The shot reflected the familiar in the history of Disney animation with the new idea of adding pieces for adults.


    10.) Pin
    [​IMG]

    My pin represented my iconic shot.

    Random History Fact
    1.). John's nickname was John Lackland.

    Stray Thought
    1.) In Disney history, can we make Robin and Marian the ancestors of Nick Wilde.


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    Last edited: Apr 29, 2018
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  4. MerlinEmrys

    MerlinEmrys Hicitus Pinicus!

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    I know it's been a second since I've been in one, but if anyone is around for the chat tonight, it starts at 7:00pm EST. :)
     
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  5. Meritre

    Meritre Active Member

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    *gets coffe to stay awake* :)
     
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  6. coblj003

    coblj003 DPF Charter Member DPF Correspondent

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    1. Initial Opinion.
    So here we are at the probably the mark of what the Post Disney-Period work is known for, major animation recycling. This film seems like it tried to cut costs to the max, it just seemed very bare bones and doesn't have the epic gravitas that the films from the Walt Era had. Storywise, Disney has yet again chosen to choose a popular story from the public domain library, though its use of anamorphic characters would distinguish it from other film/theatre works. The animation style definitely has the xerox feel to it, but it is ever more apparent with the reused animation from at least three films(Snow White, Jungle Book, Aristocats). The music has a low budget feel with the Roger Miller's songs amongst a generic 70's cartoon soundtrack. I would vote it a 3 stars out of five.

    2. Character Analysis.
    I find it hilarious that Robin Hood's "bad" traits is truely made out to how his character is perceived culturally: Cunning, sly, trickster, thieving, etc. One noticible attribute that is given to him is use of theatrics and disguise, a common trait of transformation commonly associated to foxes in folktales and legends. Robin Hood has no less then four disguises throughout the movie, though his first transformation as a Gypsy woman is also indicative of fox like behavior.

    3. Scene Analysis
    The phoney king of England dance number is where it is most evident they copied much of their animation. From Snow White- Maid Marian, Baloo-Little John, Aristocats-various accompaniment, etc, it feels less an Easter egg feel versus being a blantant cost saving tactic.
    .

    4. Song Analysis
    Bravely bold sir Robin, came down from Camelo.... sorry, wrong film. Actually one of the interesting things in the repeat of refrain of Ooh De Lally at the end was that it incorporated a semi-full choir. I wonder why only for this short end piece when the rest of the film was so bare and as it was something that hadn't been really done in a feature animation since before 101 Dalmatians.

    8. Progressions
    It is fitting that the vultures are part of the royal guard in this film. Much of their roles go from guarding prisoners or creating a gallows which is a hint at what their general cultural symbolism. In the film though they aren't perceived as evil either, who are seen guarding the three true villains at the end of the film.
     
  7. pincrazy

    pincrazy Well-Known Member

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    1) Found Robin Hood a more complete story, returning to a Disney classic feel. Entertaining characters, mysic, and animation. Seems like some of the earlier works.

    3) Enjoyed the animation sequence with the opening credits. Sadly I missed the names credited, being distracted and entertained by the animation. I'd also like to acknowledge the srquence with the rescue of Friar Tuck and Robin's escape, cleverly thoughtout and animated.

    5) The symbol was pronounced by Prince John The Crown, as he said it gave him the feeling of Power!

    7) The overall goal seemed to "be Good", standing up against wrong, and love can triumph. There's a political statement, that all rulers aren't good and misuse their powers, that seems to be the theme, but can be corrected and remedied by those that stand up against them.

    10) Pin#11453 with Robin/Skippy, tied with pin #35978 Prince John for design and artwork : )
     
  8. MerlinEmrys

    MerlinEmrys Hicitus Pinicus!

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    If you're around the chat will be starting up shortly! :)
     
  9. unibear

    unibear DPF Charter Member DPF Charter Member

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    1... 2... 5!
     
  10. MerlinEmrys

    MerlinEmrys Hicitus Pinicus!

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    [​IMG]
    The Many Adventures of Winnie the Pooh (1977)

    Monday is our "wrap-up" discussion on Robin Hood. So you're welcome to respond to other analyses throughout the day.

    However, you may not post any more full analyses for Robin Hood to count for completion toward the 52 Challenge. No late homework. ;P

    ~Merlin
     
  11. timeerkat

    timeerkat Your Friend Who Likes To Play

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    Edit: this posted before I was done. Will come back and post the rest of my questions when I have a bit of time.

    1. This is more of a slice of life film than most of the preceding ones. It was three standalone segments that were made over the course of a decade, so there isn't really one storyline through the entire film. But I think that with these characters, that fits. Christopher Robin's imagination brings all of the stuffed animals to life. A very young boy would probably think is smaller chunks of time and in separate stories than one very large one. (I know there are feature length Pooh movies later on, but this was a great introduction to the characters. And I believe that those take place when he's older.)

    I grew up on the New Adventures of Winnie the Pooh on Saturday mornings, so those are the voices I'm most used to. So throughout this movie, I kept going "This voice sounds very familiar but I can't place it!" and after looking it up on IMDB realized it's because the majority of characters from this are voiced by Disney recurring actors. For instance, Rabbit has the same voice actor as Archimedes, and Kanga has the same voice actor as Lady (and Little Sister/Mama Rabbit from Robin Hood). Of course Sterling Holloway was a dead giveaway. That being said, the actors did a good job of changing their voices for the characters - close enough where I could tell I recognized them from somewhere but changed enough where I couldn't place from where.



    8. Similar to many earlier movies, this one started out with the book and a narrator. But, as a progression from those, the book and narrator were involved through the entire movie. They each became secondary characters, with the on-screen characters interacting directly with the book and conversing with the narrator. I also think that adding in the book was a clever way to connect the three segments, which were all developed years apart from each other.

    I didn't notice nearly as much recycled animation from other films in this one, though there was some in-film recycled shots (whenever Christopher Robin as summoned, they used the same shot of him climbing over the fence with Rabbit scrambling ahead, doubling back towards him, and then running ahead.



    Random Thoughts

    1 - I don't usually follow animators, and usually can't pick out one animator's style over another's, but during the Winnie the Pooh and Tigger too segment, I could tell that Rabbit was done by Don Bluth. His facial expressions, the way he carried his body, and his mouth/tongue movements were all very similar to the art in Secret of NIMH.

    2 - I adored the little touch when Rabbit draws the moose face on Pooh's backside, and he laughs, making the mouth go squiggly. It cuts to Pooh and he's got the same facial expression on for a beat.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
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  12. unibear

    unibear DPF Charter Member DPF Charter Member

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    This was one of my absolutely most favorite Disney movies as a kid, and I still love it to this day!


    1. My overall impression of the movie… Several things:
    • This movie feels very episodic, and I definitely remember watching the stand alone cartoons as a kid (“Honey Tree”, “Blustery Day”, and “Tigger Too”), but they don’t feel completely disjoint, certainly not as bad as “Alice in Wonderland”, for example.
    • This movie opens with a book, but in this case I quite like it! The characters are introduced using the book’s inner cover, and the book acts like a character or major symbol in the movie (I thought about analyzing the book as a character or symbol, but ultimately chose others). The book is used to transition from story to story or scene to scene. It’s also used as part of the actual story (catching Pooh as he was ejected from the bee hive/tree and helping Tigger get out of the tree) and the characters actually interact with the Narrator as well. Also, the book is used to convey certain ideas: Owl talks a lot (for literally pages), the wind was really blustery (blowing words and letters across the book), the rain was torrential (washing words and letters away), etc.
    • There are many misspellings (Rnig, howse, hunny, cabege, kerits, etc.) and inverted/backward letters (N and S, commonly). I feel like the goal of that was to suggest that this whole world was invented by a child, with a limited grasp on letter and spelling. I think we’re supposed to interpret this as endearing and not insulting.
    • The scene where Pooh and Gopher are talking as Gopher is eating his lunch in front of a stuck-in-Rabbit’s-hole Pooh is a little cringe worthy with respect to the mispronunciation of the letter ‘S’.
    • There are so many wonderful songs in this movie: “Winnie the Pooh”, “Up Down”, “Rumbly in my Tumbly”, “Little Black Raincloud”, “Wonderful Thing about Tiggers”, “Heffalumps and Woozles”, and “Rain Rain Rain”, to name just a few.
    • This movie was the first time I ever heard the word “blokes”. I eventually learned that it meant “guys”, and I guess I also learned that Tigger was Australian!
    • This movie also has one my favorite puns from Eeyore: “It’s not much of a tail, but I’m sort of attached to it.”


    2. The character I chose to analyze was Tigger, because he’s a kitty and my most favorite character from this movie as a kid (I still love Tigger, but as I’ve gotten older, I like Pooh more and more). In the “Blustery Day”, Tigger was introduced in the night filled with anxious sorts of noises. Pooh is frightened of the unknown (noises and such) and Tigger bursts in and bounces Pooh. Tigger is full of bluster and bravado, and tends to speak about himself in the third-person (“Everyone’s scared of Tiggers!”). Tigger acts very brave and strong, but he’s also afraid of his own reflection in the mirror. Tigger introduces himself with a very cool song, “The Wonderful Thing about Tiggers” (the first song I ever remember memorizing as a kid). Finally, Tigger introduces “Heffalumps and Woozles” (another one of my favorite songs, see below) as honey stealers to Pooh.

    Tigger’s character is a bit more developed in “Tigger Too”. Still full of bluster and bravado (afraid of heights), Tigger announces that “Tigger do” just about everything “the best!” However, when he’s not so good at it (like ice skating) he announces that, “Tiggers do NOT like” whatever it is he wasn’t so good at. Tigger likes bouncing just about everyone (but Pooh and Rabbit the most).

    I’d say that Tigger represents a free spirit who does as he pleases without much thought to it. As such, I find him to be a very likeable and charming character. This is in contrast to Rabbit, who is a stick-in-the-mud and very opposed to Tigger’s free-spirit nature, and therefore less appealing. Rabbit tries to repress Tigger’s free spirit, first by trying to get Tigger lost so he will be “humble, small, and sad”. This scene felt particularly satisfying because it blows up in Rabbit’s face, getting Rabbit lost instead of Tigger and making him a “humiliated Rabbit, a lost-and-found Rabbit…” Rabbit does win out (temporarily) by forcing Tigger into renouncing his bouncing (got to love that rhyme). Even as a kid, I felt that there was nothing sadder than a Tigger who couldn’t bounce, and thankfully Pooh and friends coerce Rabbit into letting Tigger bounce again. I also found it very ironic that Rabbit doesn’t like bouncing, even though rabbits in general are known for their bouncing…

    Tigger also gave me many of my favorite lines as a kid: “TTFN: Ta-ta for now!”, “bunny boy”, “long ears”, and “blokes”.


    3. The scene I chose to analyze was the end scene of Christopher Robin saying goodbye to Pooh. This scene plays to the fact that every child must eventually grow up and give up their childish ways. Still, as a kid (and even now) this scene was incredibly sad to me. I never understood why Christopher Robin couldn’t go to school (grow up) but still visit Pooh and friends (still retain some of his childlike characteristics). I still feel this is a false dichotomy, and I’ve tried to grow up but not lose all of my childlike wonder…

    I also found it ironic that Christopher Robin asks Pooh not to forget him, but the real issue is that Christopher Robin is more likely to forget Pooh and his childlike adventures with Pooh and his friends. Rather a sad and poignant scene, but is it a necessary one? I am reminded of the end of the movie “Labyrinth”, where Sarah has returned from her fanciful adventures, but promises NOT to forget her friends from the labyrinth and they have a party at the end of the movie. I like that ending better…


    4. The song I chose to analyze was “Heffalumps and Woozles”. This song and the very idea of its characters were introduced to Pooh by Tigger as honey stealers. The overall feel of the song is meant to be scary or spooky (minor chords) but I still find it to be endearing. The scene is very colorful and the lyrics are very cool and imaginative (it has my most favorite rhyme in all of Disney movies except maybe those in“I Won’t Say I’m in Love” for Hercules: “If honey’s what you covet, you’ll find that they love it”—brilliant!).

    The characters (“villains” in this movie, if there are any, which I doubt) are undoubtedly based on elephants and weasels, but much more colorful and whimsical. They’re really not that threatening at all, except to a Pooh bear afraid of his honey being stolen, since all they seem to do is steal Pooh’s honey!

    As a kid, I used to play many instruments including the bass clarinet, and I remember learning the solo in this song as a practice lesson! Also, I have to say that this particular scene is my absolutely most favorite part of the Many Adventures of Pooh ride in the parks. That part of the ride is incredibly colorful and fun, and I still vividly remember that elephant with his trunk lit like a cannon and the ensuing smoke ring from that ride. Fun!


    5. The specific symbol I chose to analyze was Christopher Robin’s umbrella. Throughout the different shorts, it symbolizes safety and protection. In “Honey Tree”, Christopher Robin uses it to help protect Pooh’s ruse that he is a little black rain cloud by opening it and repeatedly saying, “Tut-tut, it looks like rain!” He then uses it to shelter himself and Pooh in the mud puddle from the hoard of bees. Later, Christopher Robin uses the umbrella to shield a very stuck Pooh’s head from the rain when he was in Rabbit’s hole. Finally, in “Blustery Day”, Tigger, Rabbit, Kanga, and Roo used Christopher Robin’s umbrella as a boat to reach the safety of Christopher Robin’s house.


    6. The quote I chose to analyze was Gopher’s theme and variations of this running joke: First, when Gopher was introduced, he said, “I’m not in the book, but I’m at your service.” Then, as he was leaving his discussion with Owl about freeing Pooh, he said, “Think it over, let me know. You’ve got my card. I’m not in the book, you know.” Finally, when he fell down his hole, he said, “I’m not in the book, and I’m a ding-dang glad of it!”

    At first, it seems like a joke about Gopher’s phone number being unlisted and that’s he’s not in the phone book. However, the pun of it all is that he’s not actually in A. A. Milne’s books either! As a kid, I missed this! I really only figured it out when I was in the park and the Pooh ride when I happened to talk to a couple from Britain and they told me that Gopher wasn’t an A. A. Milne character at all!


    8. This movie continues to build on (and recycle) previous motifs used in other Disney movies. These include:
    • Voice recycling: Tigger (Shun Gon), Pooh (Kaa), and the Narrator (Narrator/Sir Ector in “Sword and the Stone”, Bagheera). For me, the characters in this movie are the default characters for these voices, so it doesn’t bother me near as much in this movie as it did in the other movies!
    • Animation recycling: Tigger bounces Pooh and Rabbit several times, and it feels the same. Also I saw a couple of scenes with Christopher Robin jumping over a fence with Rabbit in front of him.


    9. Because this movie is so episodic, it’s hard to come up with one scene that is iconic. I thought about Pooh stuck in the honey tree or with the bees, I thought about Pooh stuck in Rabbit’s hole, I thought about the Heffalumps and Woozles song, I thought about Tigger caught in the tree, etc. etc. etc. So, I chose this scene with Tigger after he pounced on Pooh because… well, I just liked it!

    [​IMG]

    10. I chose this pin (20918) because it’s got most of the characters (except for Rabbit and Christopher Robin), and it’s even got the bees!

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: May 5, 2018
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  13. Ventchick

    Ventchick The DPF Ventriloquist

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    Sent you a pm thru Tapatalk.


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  14. timeerkat

    timeerkat Your Friend Who Likes To Play

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    2. Eeyore's always been my favorite Winnie the Pooh character, but watching this gave me a much bigger appreciation for Pooh himself.

    While he may seem like just a "silly old bear" on the surface, there is a lot to Pooh. He has qualities that others may find as weaknesses (short, fat, obsessed with honey, "bear of little brain"), but he embraces these qualities. Not only does he see them as part of who he is, he is proud of them. He is who he is, is happy with who he is, and doesn't try to change himself to please others. He thinks outside the box - when trying to get honey, he comes up with the idea of dressing like a raincloud to trick the bees, and while it wasn't effective it was definitely creative. He is also a true friend to all, even when he first meets someone (like Tigger and Gopher). He shares his victories with his friends and doesn't hesitate to give them credit when it is deserved (he suggests that his hero party becomes a two-hero party after Piglet gives up his house for Owl).

    I could really see the personality and imagination of a small boy reflected in Pooh. After all, Pooh and the rest of the Hundred Acre Wood animals are actually products of Christopher Robin's imagination. (All of the characters reflect how a child would see them in the world - Piglet is small, so he is shy and timid; Eeyore is grey and droopy so he is slow and sad, Rabbit is a rabbit, so he is excitable and loves vegetables, Kanga is a a mother and watches over the gang as such, etc.)


    9. It was hard for me to choose, as these are iconic parts of each of the segments. But I chose the gang pulling Pooh out from Rabbit's house. It highlights the friendship that everyone has for each other and their willingness to help a friend in need.

    [​IMG]

    10. I went with the Beloved Tales, as it almost perfectly matches the shot above:

    [​IMG]
    Pin# 90460 - DSF - Beloved Tales - The Many Adventures of Winnie the Pooh
     
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  15. pincrazy

    pincrazy Well-Known Member

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    This film holds a special memory, it was the movie that babysat my daughter's early years and characters decorated her nursery, back when Sears catalog was a mom's best friend!
    Since my library copy was damaged, I made a rush to find another copy at Best Buy :pooh:

    1) Overall impression, I always felt the story reminded us of childhood memories. While the story was cleverly intertwined opening with Christopher's live room and then leading to the book, using the text as part of the animation, and teaching children word association as if reading along. It's the classic toy story of a child's world alive with his favorite companions. It's endearing, well animated, and timeless.
    2) Pooh is a character of childlike innocence and ambition, at times forgetful, and holds friendships close. As a main character Pooh is cuddly, unpretentious, and very lovable. He's resourceful in his comical way to analyze his situations/adventures. Sterling Holloway seems a perfect match for Pooh's voice..
    3) The scene they celebrate Pooh for being a hero for saving Piglet during the flood, turned into a shared acknowledgment with Piglet for giving Owl his home. It's a moment of charity and friendship. Although Piglet allows Eeyore to give his home to owl, none if the other characters understand not to correct Eeyore either. Although it seems unusual that only Owl doesn't know that it's Piglet's home, it teaches us that friendship is also in the giving and sharing, possible also in empathy for others.
    5) The symbol seems to be honey, it lures Pooh into inconevient situations. Seems to represent things we enjoy, and the trouble we get into while finding/searching/attaining them and how our decisions make situations good/bad., while making us happy.
    Hmmm sounds familiar.
    6) Christopher Robin: Well, its, when grownups ask "What are you going to do?" And you say "Nothing." Then you go out and do it. ---- it's the statement acknowleging that childhood is carefree, and he is growing up. Christopher is saying good-bye to his childhood friend, and realizing he will no longer be able to do "nothing".
    Rushing to turn this in, hmmm I hope I covered everything. :stitch:
     
  16. MerlinEmrys

    MerlinEmrys Hicitus Pinicus!

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    1. Overall Impression
    To be perfectly honest, this film rather exhausted me. Its episodic vibe was so strong that it felt twice as long as it really was because there was not a cohesive overarching plot. Certainly, we’ve had other films that film episodic, like Alice, but those typically had a frame narrative that the episodes (often loosely) propelled forward. This film did not—nor does the book it’s based on. But somehow, the book feels more cohesive, possibly because I have the ability to close the book for a while, hahah! Any one of these shorts are delightful, but strung together they don’t work quite as well.


    2. Character Analysis
    I’ve taught the book a few times now, which has given me a different perspective on most of the characters. And with this watch-through, I found myself really connected to Rabbit. (It doesn’t hurt that he’s voiced by Archimedes—nor that he’s animated by Don Bluth in the Misty Forest segment). But in the Hundred Acre Wood, most of the characters are more “child” characters, such as Pooh or Piglet. There are three “adult” characters and qualities: Kanga (mother), Owl (“wisdom”), and Rabbit (manners). When Pooh visits Rabbit’s for lunch, Rabbit is frantic because Pooh will eat all of his food, and we see why because Rabbit keeps offering him more because it’s the polite thing to do when one has guests, even though Rabbit doesn’t want to. There’s just something very human about that which really resonates with me. I also enjoy the fact that Rabbit doesn’t like Tigger’s bouncing until he bounces for himself and finds they have something in common. (There’s a similar event in the first Pooh book where Rabbit tries to get Kanga to leave because she’s a foreign animal, but becomes very fond of Roo once he gets to know him).


    5. Symbol Analysis / 6. Line Analysis
    Without a doubt, the Book itself is a powerful element in all of these shorts. It provides transitions on a film mechanics level (the characters actually cross over pages), it connects the film to the source material and better establishes the viewer as a “reader” as well, and it also works on the meta level as it saves Tigger from the top of the tree. However, there are a few points where they got a little heavy handed with the metaphor: namely with Gopher’s “I’m not in the book, you know!” Which, yes, he’s not in the book, but he and other characters repeat that point many many times to the extent that it got distracting (and kinda tacky). His not being in the book gives him the opportunity to do something “unexpected” (even though the film has already taken liberties with the source material). However, he doesn’t ever actually do anything beyond mentioning dynamite and calling attention to the fact that he’s not in the book… But you ARE in the movie, Gopher—so you might as well do something! XD


    9. Iconic Shot
    It’s hard to pick an iconic shot since each of these sequences can basically stand alone on their own, but I think everyone banding together to pull Pooh out of Rabbit’s House would have to win:

    [​IMG]

    If the Pooh Sticks sequence was in this film, I’d have gone with that instead, hahah!


    10. Representative Pin
    Again, another tough one but I’ll have to go with this:

    [​IMG]
    Pin 67685 DisneyShopping.com - Jumbo Christopher Robin & Pooh Pin

    Reading is such an important part of the spirit of the film, that I think this does a good job of capturing that. These characters are all extensions of Christopher Robin’s (re: the reader’s) imagination, so having Pooh there as CR is reading I think represents the core of the film.
     
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  17. PixiePost

    PixiePost Previously SoraPandora

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    Ooh, I like that pin.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
     
  18. MerlinEmrys

    MerlinEmrys Hicitus Pinicus!

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    Just a reminder, we will be having the chat tonight at 7pm. :)

    Sent from my SM-G950U1 using Tapatalk
     
  19. Meritre

    Meritre Active Member

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    I remember I gave the book as a gift to my very first teacher when I had to say goodbye to her.
    I found myself connected to Rabbit, too. In the hungarian version Winnie and archimedes share the voice actor (he later goes voicing Genie) And the Narrator and Mufasa also share the voice :)

    :) :D :D

    I would have chosen this one, too, it is the part I remember from the book best as well.

    I couldn't agree more! :) (And we are still doing it *looks at the dolls sitting on the self and thinks of all their stories and adventures*)
     
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  20. MerlinEmrys

    MerlinEmrys Hicitus Pinicus!

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    If anyone is around, feel free to join me in the D52 chat! :)
     
  21. PixiePost

    PixiePost Previously SoraPandora

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    It’s interesting seeing the characters that people connect most to in Winnie the Pooh. I connected most of all to Eeyore when I was younger, later Piglet, and now most of all Pooh.

    [​IMG]

    It looks like a lot of us embrace our inner silly old bear when we get older.



    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
     
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  22. MerlinEmrys

    MerlinEmrys Hicitus Pinicus!

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    [​IMG]
    The Rescuers (1977)

    Monday is our "wrap-up" discussion on The Many Adventures of Winnie the Pooh. So you're welcome to respond to other analyses throughout the day.

    However, you may not post any more full analyses for The Many Adventures of Winnie the Pooh to count for completion toward the 52 Challenge. No late homework. ;P

    ~Merlin
     
  23. coblj003

    coblj003 DPF Charter Member DPF Correspondent

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    Now I feel glad that I did Bedknobs and broomsticks, I was gone all day so unable to finish today...
     
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  24. timeerkat

    timeerkat Your Friend Who Likes To Play

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    Holy cow, there have been twenty movies reviewed so far!
     
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  25. MerlinEmrys

    MerlinEmrys Hicitus Pinicus!

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    RIGHT!? Isn't that crazy!? And the Renaissance is on the horizon now! End of June!!
     
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