Having a panic attack, calling all word warriors to the rescue!

Discussion in 'Anything Goes' started by Disneychildwithin, May 13, 2019.

  1. akarih

    akarih Meme Lord

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    @DCW your future employer with your resume praying for more like it giphy-2.gif

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  2. Kerri780

    Kerri780 Active Member

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    Good luck Lucy you've got this!!!
    I would say the cliche of fail to prepare, prepare to fail is accurate here! Again, don't got robotic but you're going to be nervous so really have some ideas of specific answers you can give ready and practised so that you don't feel like you're rambling a load of rubbish on the spot :)

    Also, pretty much the sentiment everyone here has said, SELF CONFIDENCE! Who cares if you've been emplotyed or not, you've got a huge amount of skills that are transferable.. think about it like this if they didn't see potential or think you're right for the job you wouldn't have got an interview.
    I'd pretty happily bet that some with more direct experience and more current 'work' (being a mum is blinking hard work!!!) experience than yourself didn't get interviews..
     
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  3. Disneychildwithin

    Disneychildwithin No Disney Character Left Behind Proclaimer

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    Ann, holding people's lives in the palm of her hands...

    you're all grown up!

    [​IMG]
     
  4. chubs191

    chubs191 Beautiful Tomorrow Admirer

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    The advice that I was gonna give seems inapplicable to this specialized interview. The one bit of advice I was given, but could not master, was interview for the job like you're interviewing them. I also just want to chime in and say break a leg! You're gonna be amazing! A clerk position would be a great foot in the door to understanding how to get where you want to go.

    If you wanna hear some bad interview stories to learn from other's mistakes, I put them in a spoiler tag:
    It can't be as bad as my co-worker's interview she was telling me about: there were 10 other applicants and a board of interviewers and they had to pick an animal they related to. People shoved her out of the way for all the animals she could relate herself to and she ended up with the crocodile. She nailed it, but still didn't get the job. So, it might take a couple of nailed interviews to land a job, even if you can relate yourself to a crocodile.

    It also can't be as bad as mine, where I actually landed an interview in THE place I want to work (yes, for those of you who know, that place). To find out that not only were they throwing outfield questions at me because they probably had already interviewed someone more qualified, but also the job didn't fit the job description in the listing. BUT I gained valuable insight into how their structure works and what I need to do to gain a job in what I actually want to do.
    I'll close this out with my favorite Walt quote:
     
    Last edited: May 13, 2019
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  5. momin.ator

    momin.ator Well-Known Member

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    I feel your pain. I have been thinking about looking for a job too. I am also a stay at home mom.
    You are so brave! I know you are going to do great!
     
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  6. ItzaPinfan

    ItzaPinfan Noob

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    The imposter syndrome is real no matter how seasoned an employee or how much experience one has. Perfectly normal to feel anxious and nervous, so I hope you can be kinder to yourself about it.

    If I may speak from personal experience, I find what works for me is to pump myself up before a nervous time, a good ole Disney song-a-long works wonder and I go in remembering, I have nothing to lose really, and everything to gain.

    Good luck and be kind to yourself, your background and life experience make you more than qualified for this role. You got this!


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  7. slbrabham

    slbrabham Well-Known Member

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    Lucy,

    You will be wonderful and any employer will be lucky to have you. Good luck.
     
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  8. krand1276

    krand1276 Well-Known Member

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    @chubs191 Do not feel bad about not mastering that. It all depends on the position you’re interviewing for and unfortunately, the person doing the hiring. For any of the entry level positions I hire for, I don’t mind a couple of innocent questions, but if they come across like they’re in charge of the interview, I don’t hire them. I report to HR that they didn’t seem like they’d be able to be a follower and be open to training, they may want to be in charge and do things their own way (gambling is a very regulated industry), and just generally give us problems down the road. I had one guy that seemed great in the interview, but when I asked if he had questions, he started asking me questions about my own position: what all I did, what kinds of qualifications were required, where I went to college. Strangely, it came across more creepy stalker-ish than threatening that he was wanting my job. He was not hired.
     
  9. dancecats

    dancecats Administrator Staff Member DPF Administrator

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    Since I don't have anything to contribute that hasn't already been mentioned, I'm just going to wish you the best of luck. Believe in yourself; you are completely qualified for this job and you've got this.
     
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  10. MischiefMade

    MischiefMade Ghost Dog Trainer

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    Personally when I think about using this technique as more about "will this job/company also be suitable for me". If I knew that it was about being on a phone I might ask something like "what kinds of situations would I be dealing with on phone calls" or sometimes I'll ask about when and if I am going to get medical benefits and how long the probation period is going to be, what the salary expectation is, and if there would be any opportunities for growth in my future with the company, etc. I think a lot of people take it from the side where you should be assertive and in charge, but I at least have taken it more in the way that this is my future, and if the company/position doesn't fit with me and what I want to achieve, then what is the point for the both of us? I don't want to waste the company's time, nor my own by finding out that this isn't the place for me.
     
  11. krand1276

    krand1276 Well-Known Member

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    Yes, I consider those as innocent questions. Most of them are actually covered between the interview with the HR person (benefits, pay, probation period) and the more department specific ones are covered by me (growth, job duties and expectations). If someone comes in with a challenging attitude: what’s the company going to do for me - as opposed to what is available to me; or (it’s hard to convey in type - it’s the brash attitude) You’d better choose me or you’d regret it - rather than I know I would be a great fit and an asset to your company. Confident, not cocky, is good.
     
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  12. MischiefMade

    MischiefMade Ghost Dog Trainer

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    Oh I know the type. I've sat in on many an interview in the past.
     
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  13. Booger1964

    Booger1964 Well-Known Member

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    Congratulations and good luck! I didn't come up with anything for you on my own, but maybe some of these tips from a recent article will help...

    Interview Tips for Stay-at-Home Moms Reentering Today’s Job Market


    Interview Tips for Stay-at-Home Moms Returning to Work

    By Sharon Reed Abboud, adapted from All Moms Work: Short-Term Career Strategies for Long-Range Success

    In today’s economy, many of America’s 5 million stay-at-home moms may find they need to go back to work. While crafting resumes and landing job interviews may be challenging, projecting confidence in a job interview you’ve secured may be your biggest hurdle.

    As a stay-at-home mom, the critical component of success in interviews for reentry is to be self-assured and project confidence in your career decision to stay home with your children. How do you project that confidence? The key to successful interviewing is to: hold your head high and don’t apologize.

    You should be confident, because you have worked hard at balancing your personal and professional priorities as a stay-at-home mom. Never apologize for staying home! Explain with confidence that you stayed home, because it was the best decision for your particular family and that you are now eager to reenter the professional workforce.

    Prepare for Confidence

    For a successful interview, not only will you need to project confidence about your decision to stay home, but also in your professional qualifications and ability to do the job. You will need to be up-to-date in both technology skills and industry information. You don’t want to reenter the job market like a Rip Van Winkle, wondering why everything has changed. You can get current industry information by conducting online and offline research, networking and taking classes.

    By preparing yourself to reenter the workforce, you will avoid the situations like that of one woman who went back to work after 12 years and telephoned her husband during her lunch break and said, "Why didn’t you tell me there aren’t any secretaries anymore?" She was shocked she had to type her own business correspondence. The first day another mom went back to work, her boss told her to save a document on a flash drive -- a device she had never even heard of.

    Other longtime stay-at-home moms are surprised by fashion changes ("business casual"), office culture (emailing the person in the next cubicle instead of getting up and walking 10 feet to talk to them) and general jargon ("teaming" instead of "team building," in some industries, for example).

    Source Your Network

    Networking is key here. You might consider taking a few friends or former colleagues out to lunch and asking them directly: "What’s new in our industry?" and "What do you think I need to know?" Be sure to also lurk (parlance for reading but not posting) on online industry boards to find out about changes in corporate culture.

    You will also develop confidence by researching a prospective company, which in turn will enable you to express industry and company knowledge during an interview. By learning about the company, you’ll be able to ask appropriate questions in your interview.

    A Typical Interview

    In a typical interview, the interviewer will take the time to provide an overview of the company or organization, describe the job that you are interviewing for, and then ask if you have any questions. During this time, you will need to listen attentively and project confidence and professionalism. It’s important to maintain eye contact but not stare them down. Be careful never to appear bored. Try to appear enthusiastic about the job opportunity.

    Watch your body language -- your nonverbal gestures during an interview -- because you can flub your interview by sending the wrong message. There are many facets for projecting positive body language; here are a few examples:

    • Use a firm and confident handshake (not limp, but not aggressive).
    • Do not sit before the interviewer sits down.
    • Do not slouch in your chair.
    • Do not put your hands in your pockets or fold your arms in front of you.
    • Do not look at the clock, your watch or cellphone.
    • Lean slightly forward to look interested in the conversation.
    • Speak clearly and confidently.
    Dress Up for Your Job Interview

    It’s important to dress professionally for your interview. Your first step is to try to find out what type of clothing people wear in the organization in which you are interviewing, and then try to dress accordingly. Remember, there are divergent norms for dressing in different types of industries; for example, if you’re applying for a banking job, then you will need to dress more conservatively than if you are interviewing for a job in advertising. That said, if you find that the company you are interviewing with has an overall casual dress policy and culture, you will still want to project your respect for the organization by taking the time to dress up in professional attire for the interview.

    Speak Confidently

    At your interview, be sure to project your confidence, but not arrogance, by speaking clearly. Try not to mumble. For some people, this can be very difficult, because you may feel very nervous. The key to alleviating this nervousness is practice. For most people, interviewing is a learned skill and does not come naturally. You can practice interviewing in front of the mirror or by using a tape recorder or video recorder. Or, you may ask your spouse or a friend to role play your interview. It’s important to practice many times so that the interview will seem natural to you.

    Question Time

    One of the key components to practicing how to interview effectively is to learn to anticipate and answer questions, and also ask appropriate questions. Generally speaking, many interviewers ask many of the same types of interview questions, so you may be able to anticipate these and practice your responses. Be careful not to sound canned when you reply, though.

    As a mom reentering the workforce, you may be asked questions directly related to your reentering status. For example: How have you kept your skills up-to-date?

    This is the key question that may get you the job. Be ready to explain everything you have done to keep up-to-date with your skills. For example, have you worked as a volunteer or taken classes while at home?

    Keep in mind that employers are prohibited by federal law to ask about childcare arrangements at the pre-employment stage. It is also unlawful to ask if you are pregnant or plan to have more children.

    Ask Your Interviewer the Best Questions

    At some point in the interview, the interviewer will ask, "Do you have any questions for me?" So, while you are doing your research, be sure to make a list of possible questions and tweak them as you find out more about the company. Your best questions will show that you have done your research and have a sincere interest in the company and its operations.
     
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  14. caw caw rawr

    caw caw rawr Squirrel!

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  15. Connies_Hobby

    Connies_Hobby SPREADING the DISNEY PIN MAGIC!!

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    Oh my word.. congratulations on the interview. Woot-woot.

    I don't need to add one suggestion, it's all been covered above.

    Completely and totally!

    Best of luck!

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  16. watzshakinbacon

    watzshakinbacon B for Belle or B for bacon?

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    Congrats on the interview!! I'm sure it'll be a really big change after being a stay-at-home mom for so long.

    Everyone has already put in really good advice (and I'm sure you've done a lot of Googling yourself), so I just want to say good luck!! <3
     
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  17. chubs191

    chubs191 Beautiful Tomorrow Admirer

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    Have a good time today!
     
  18. akarih

    akarih Meme Lord

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    Good luck, you'll do great! And here's all the job opportunities getting offered to you in a gif tumblr_nbmd3kdzQc1tc2omxo2_r1_250.gif

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  19. theoucharis

    theoucharis Well-Known Member

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    Hope it went well today for you, Lucy.

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  20. momin.ator

    momin.ator Well-Known Member

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    How did your interview go?
     
  21. dancecats

    dancecats Administrator Staff Member DPF Administrator

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    This. Spill some tea; enquiring (read: nosy) and supportive minds want to know ... . :)
     
  22. TheMickeyMouseRules

    TheMickeyMouseRules Cat Expert Mouse Authority and Paperfolder

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    Yes... agreed.

    Do hope it went really well though. Totally understand if you do not want to share. :)

    I hope you don't get even close to my recent experience... but I had to go through ~ 40 interviews (mostly firsts, quite of few 2nds, and ~3-4 3rds) to finally find a new job in February of this year. Its tough for me to sell myself (avoiding bragging is ingrained in me), but after this record breaking number of interviews (at least for me), I hope, I finally have the process down. After quite a few rejections, I finally went full steam with the 'bragging about me' ... and it worked. Note: Did not lie. Did not say anything negative. Did not hold back on the positive adjectives about myself or the job. Was not reserved, subtle or coy.
     
  23. krand1276

    krand1276 Well-Known Member

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    Lucy, if it helps: I absolutely thought I bombed out on my oral board. I didn't tell anyone except my husband before then because I was worried I'd have to go back and tell them all that I failed. After the oral board, I was on a plane to DLR and kicking myself the whole way that I should have said this and I forgot to say that. When we met up, Shelterkat was actually the second person I told and I told her I was sure I hadn't passed. Pincrazy was the next and I told her the same thing. (Both ladies were wonderfully supportive and encouraging, btw. Thank you so much for that!) Then I came home after the weekend and on Tuesday, I was called and told I was moving on to the next stage. I was shocked! Don't suffer through this alone. We're here for you!

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