The Disney 52 Animated Challenge: Year-Long Activity - NOW PLAYING: Award Ceremony

Discussion in 'DPF Game Room' started by MerlinEmrys, Dec 15, 2017.

  1. unibear

    unibear DPF Charter Member DPF Charter Member

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    Is it just me, or does the Backson kind of look like Sulley?! Kitty!!
     
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  2. MerlinEmrys

    MerlinEmrys Hicitus Pinicus!

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    [​IMG] [​IMG]
    Wreck-It Ralph (2012) and Frozen (2013)

    Monday/Tuesday is our "wrap-up" discussion on Tangled and Winnie the Pooh. So you're welcome to respond to other analyses throughout the day.

    However, you may not post any more full analyses for Tangled and Winnie the Pooh to count for completion toward the 52 Challenge. No late homework. ;P

    ~Merlin
     
  3. MerlinEmrys

    MerlinEmrys Hicitus Pinicus!

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    And with one last change to the schedule, we will double up this week on WiR and Frozen (through the 15th) and then BH6 and Zootopia the following. We are in the final stretch now. :)

    (and maybe now that grades have been turned in, I can actually get back to doing this! XD)
     
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  4. unibear

    unibear DPF Charter Member DPF Charter Member

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    OK, I just gave two finals yesterday and really need to be grading these, but I decided to do this analysis first. As such, this might be short—although I’m not sure that’s possible from me.

    1. and 8. My overall impression of the movie… Several things:

    I remember liking this movie, but thinking is was just okay. In watching it again, I did find that I “bought in” to the film easily and was very engaged and entertained. The movie wasn’t slow or plodding and I never really felt myself looking at the clock while watching it. I also like how well written the plot was, how they pretty effectively linked three different video games, and how well defined the individual characters were. They also worked in different video game “feels” (“Fix-It Felix Jr. = 80’s Donkey Kong, “Sugar Rush” felt very 90’s Japanese cutesy style, “Hero’s Duty” = 00’s Call of Duty). This movie also plays homage to Disney’s “Tron”, another movie based on the off-duty lives of video game characters.

    OK, as a science teacher, I just have to give a huge shout-out to the “Diet Cola and Mentos” fountain.

    King Candy uses Ralph’s fears over Vanellope’s safety to get him to act against her. Total villain move (similar to how Mother Gothel manipulates Rapunzel and how Scar shamed Simba into escaping the pride after “causing” his father’s death). While Ralph doesn’t want to do it, and you can see the conflict in him when he decides to destroy Vanellope’s car, Ralph learns a hard “hero” lesson—sometimes you have to do things you don’t want because they seem like the right thing to do. That’s part of being an adult, and part of being a “hero”.

    I also liked that Ralph was willing to sacrifice himself to save Vanellope, and accepts the final cost of his decision. It really made me like Ralph as a good guy, and even a “good-guy”. I don’t even mind that Vanellope saves him from his noble deed, and it doesn’t feel like it cheapened the sacrifice because Ralph had no idea she was going to save him.


    2. The character I chose to analyze is Fix-it Felix Jr. From previous memory, I thought that Felix was an all-around good guy, but he actually just started as a “good-guy”. By that, I mean that Felix’s view of Ralph (and therefore himself) is that Ralph is a “bad-guy” (hence, he is the “good-guy”), and that Ralph must be as fulfilled in his role as Felix is. Felix shows no compassion or comprehension for Ralph’s loneliness when he shows up at the 30-year anniversary of the game, and awkward silence ensues. While the apartment dwellers (AD) are more comfortable showing open disdain and contempt for Ralph at the party, Felix is a bit different. I remembered (incorrectly) that Felix was being a true friend to Ralph to the AD, but I see in this watching that Felix is a “people pleaser”—he was trying to make everyone at the party happy during an awkward situation but he wasn’t really a friend to Ralph. Once Ralph runs away, Felix goes after him to “Hero’s Duty” and then “Sugar Rush”, not to help his friend but because (as he tells Calhoun), “It is my job to fix what Ralph breaks.” And, later in King Candy’s fungeon, Felix goes off on Ralph because Ralph messed everything up (because he’s a “bad-guy”) and this made Felix have to clean things up and generally inconvenience Felix. I sort of get that by the end of the movie, Felix’s ideas about “good-guys” and “bad-guys” might have evolved a bit—he became friends with Ralph, and married Calhoun—but I don’t really know if we saw this change or it just happened. I also think that Felix probably never ventured out of the game before because he was generally happy with his life and saw no need for an outlet, unlike Ralph, but now that he has left the game his “world-view” has changed.


    3. and 6. (and 8.) The sequence I chose to analyze was the Bad-Anon meeting: “One Game at a Time”. This scene is a parody of an Alcoholics Anonymous (or other groups like Gambler’s Anonymous, etc.) in which the “bad-guys” from various video games came together for emotional support in their general dissatisfaction with being “bad-guys”. It seems odd that none of these characters seem to really like being bad, but some are better at resigning themselves to the fact that they are. I don’t think this necessarily means that all “bad-guys” dislike being bad, it’s just that those that are perfectly happy being evil wouldn’t be attending this particular meeting! This compilation of video characters in one spot (and the whole movie in general) has a “Who Framed Roger Rabbit” feel to it, in that they both use the idea that toons from all walks of life (cartoons/video games) live together in the same town.

    The quote I chose came from the Bad-Anon meeting: “You are a ‘bad-guy’, but this does not mean that you are bad guy.” I know that this is confusing, but I get exactly what the wrestler was trying to say—who you are is not defined by what you are, and this is a common Disney (and non-Disney) idea. Ralph (and Felix) starts out the film as archtype of the bad-guy (good-guy) and that’s about it. But, as he ventures out into other games, he starts to see that he can be more than he was programmed to be (“I’m not bad, I’m just programmed that way”, another nod to WFRR). Ralph goes to “Hero’s Duty” to be a hero, and when he gets to “Sugar Rush” he actually starts to act like something other than a “bad-guy”. Sure, he has moments of relapse (anger issues, ranting, destroying Vanellope’s car, etc.), but he also has lots of “hero” moves (chasing off the racers who destroyed Vanellope’s first car, saving Felix, getting Felix to fix the car, training Vanellope to drive, fighting candy-cy-bugs, etc.) that ultimately define who he is—a good guy even though he still plays a “bad-guy”.


    4. There weren’t many songs in this film, so I chose to analyze the “Shut Up and Drive” song. In this scene, Ralph teaches Vanellope how to drive her race car even though he can’t drive either! This feels like the traditional 80’s training montage and while fun, has been done to death in tons of movies since… well, the 80’s!


    5. I symbol I chose to analyze was the medal from “Hero’s Duty”. Ralph goes after this medal so he can live in the penthouse at “Fix-It Felix Jr.” and prove that he is a good guy that has some inherent worth, contrary to how he was treated for 30 years in the game. So, Ralph gets the medal but Vanellope steals it and uses it to enter the “Sugar Rush” race because it kind of looks like a coin. The movie makes the point (and I got it) that both of them viewed the medal/coin as a “ticket to a better life”, Ralph so that he didn’t have to live in the dump and would be seen as a member of his community and Vanellope so that she could finally be a racer in the game and be part of her (racer) community. When they both realize that they are both outcasts, they form a bond and start a friendship—kindred spirits.


    7. (and 8.) The take-home message for this movie is related to the quote I had above, and in general is that who you are is not necessarily defined by your station in life, it’s based on what you do and how you act. I think Ralph also learns that he can behave heroically, even if he is a “bad-guy”, and that is what defines who he is and not his programming. This general idea has been used by Disney at least twice before: (1) Jessica Rabbit, who was clearly drawn as a femme fatale but is a loving and caring wife to Roger, and a good person, and (2) Stitch, who was genetically designed to be evil but became a good puppy and loving member of Lilo and Nani’s ohana. And now we have Ralph, who was programmed to be a “bad-guy” but is now a good friend to Vanellope (and Felix) and is more generally accepted by his community members.


    9. I don’t know if this is the most iconic scene, but it’s one that I found to be pretty funny—when Ralph accidentally kills Felix at the 30-year party. It just really plays to the whole “it’s-a-video-game” feel of the film.

    [​IMG]

    10. OK, there really aren’t a whole lot of “Wreck It Ralph” pins that aren’t just a single character. So, I chose this one (122453) because it has Ralph, Vanellope, AND the “Hero’s Duty” medal.

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Dec 18, 2018
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  5. timeerkat

    timeerkat Your Friend Who Likes To Play

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    Did my watchings, will post my analyses tomorrow s I have an eaaaaarly day at work.
     
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  6. coblj003

    coblj003 DPF Charter Member DPF Correspondent

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    I've watched both films for this week but just got off work and have a short turnover period before I have to be back. I have the full day off tommorow from work except for heading to check out my wife's ultrasound so hopefully get them in.
     
  7. timeerkat

    timeerkat Your Friend Who Likes To Play

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    I'm so sorry for the delay. My brain is shot right now; I keep looking at my notes and they're not translating to cogent thoughts. I'll post my reviews tomorrow even if Merlin has to call the deadline beforehand.
     
  8. Meritre

    Meritre Well-Known Member

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    According to the current schedule these two movies run until the 15th, so you should be fine :) Maybe getting some rest will help?
     
    Last edited: Dec 11, 2018
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  9. MerlinEmrys

    MerlinEmrys Hicitus Pinicus!

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    @timeerkat can confirm. You have plenty of time. :)

    Sent from my SM-G950U1 using Tapatalk
     
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  10. Meritre

    Meritre Well-Known Member

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    Done with Ralph, Frozen comes tomorrow, hopefully.

    1. What is your overall impression of the film? Some possible talking points include: what you did or did not like about it; what about the film has stuck with you; what did you find different on this viewing; how would modern audiences respond to this (for the older films)… The list goes on. Hahah!
    I have a special connection to this film that somewhat also connect to this forum and me being here although I’m not a pin collector. I didn’t watch it when it came out I don’t think I even knew about it. When I registered to this forum there was a really nice person here who helped me to get something I couldn’t have gotten otherwise. I was really touched by her being so very kind to a total stranger. And one of her favourites was Vanellope. I got curious about the movie, because it was one of her favourites and watched it and loved it (I think I saw it about three years after its original release). I also shared the movie with my sister and brother who can enjoy this movie in the original language. (The hun dub is horrible) I was looking forward to watch it again for this challenge (I also planned to rewatch it right before I get to watch Wreck-It Ralph 2 but I don’t know when that will be – “When can I see you again?” I’ll stop) and I enjoyed it very much. I just love how they play with the language, it’s definitely very challenging to translat this movie to make the jokes work. I thought the characters really nice and refreshing and different from the usual.

    2. Choose one specific character to analyze. You can explore how a character acts, what they say, how they dress, etc. to explain what they may represent or their function and meaning in the narrative. Try to avoid obvious "plot" stuff (ex: the Evil Queen is a villain, so her purpose is to be bad...), but explore unique and specific elements about the character (ex: the EQ is surrounded by images of peacocks, further suggesting her obsession with vanity). You may also use these elements to explain why you connected or disconnected from the character.
    There are so many characters that it’s hard to choose! I’ll go with Ralph since I connected to him the most. He describes himself at the beginning as hot tempered, which he is but he is also a lot of other things. I think he is a bit introverted – he didn’t really have friends, didn’t meet up with the other bad guys for 30 years to get things off his chest, and had trouble communicate to them what his problem with his life was. (But the others were at fault, too, they didn’t really wanted to listen, they didn’t really care, Felix included.)
    But then again, he had no touble to befriend a child. They say, children know no fear – well it is exaggerated but in this case, I think it works. The Nicelanders were all scared of Ralph, one of the main reasons they didn’t want to have to do with him anything. And they didn’t want to change anything.
    I thought it funny that the first thing he brings up about his home when he talks about it to Vanellope is that it’s unhygienic. Not that it’s lonely there. But his main problem is that he is lonely and the others dislike, if not hate him.
    He is really one of those guys who looks rough on the outside but once you get to know them a little they are really kind and sweet. He’s also very trusting – maybe that comes from being desparate for a friend? He thinks what King Candy told him is the truth. Maybe he thinks that none of the bad guys are really bad. (I guess many of them are not really bad but there are certainly exceptions)
    One of my favourite things about this movie is that Ralph figures things out for himself – thinks and comes to a conclusion, like, he saw Vanellopes picture and that moment he realised that King Candy lied to him. And he also starts to act immediately to set the wrong he did right. I guess he is so relateable because we all make mistakes when trying to achieve a goal we think is going to change our lifes and things turn out very different from what we thought at the beginning.

    3. Choose one specific scene or sequence to analyze—tell me what response is it trying to evoke from the viewer and how does it go about getting that response? Your analysis could include the scene’s use of color, action, camera angles, music, character development, setting, backdrop, style, etc. If you can justify it with evidence from the scene, then it’s an analysis!
    I choose one of my favourite scenes, when Ralph and Vanellope make the cart. It is quite colorful like the rest of the Sugar-Rush world. Sweets and colorfulness indicate happiness but this scene is not as bright as the others showing that the characters are facing a challenge. This scene sets up practiacally the friendship between Ralph and Vanellope and is one of the most important parts.
    [​IMG]

    4. Choose one song to analyze—tell me what response is it trying to evoke from the viewer and how does it go about getting that response? What purpose does this song have in the film and does it succeed in that purpose?
    I really like the closing song, When can I see you again. It actually shows how their lives improved after the events of the movie, even Felix learned his lesson – he learned to be more empathic and I think he taught that lesson to the Nicelanders as well so they all get along well now. (Even if he was the best of the bunch he was just, nice enough only meant that he wasn’t mean to Ralph but he wasn’t a friend, either.) It actually sums up the movie pretty well: don’t be afraid to try and seek the things you want, be it a friend or becoming a racer or simply just venturing out of your comfortzone.
    Maybe it even points at the sequel when Ralph and Vanellope meet for a new adventure? (I have no idea as I haven't seen the sequel and know only what I saw in the trailers)

    5. Choose one specific symbol in the film to analyze. A symbol is typically something inanimate, an object, rather than a character. So don’t say “Brer Bear represents dumb people,” as that’s more of a character analysis than a symbol. Rather, think about specific objects (jewelry, clothing, houses, food, weapons, etc.) What does this symbol mean and how does that meaning impact the film?
    I choose the medal Vanellope gave to Ralph, it stands for their friendship and it reflects that perfectly well. It looks like a cookie, well something sweet and baked and edible – it reflects how they befriended each other in that world of sweets and strengthened their friendship through a deal and as a part of that deal, they baked a kart together. One side of the cookie stands for the teasing part – they love to tease each other, like at the end when Ralph leaves to return to his own game. And the hero part show that they are willing to do anything for each other – even including giving their lives so the other can live.

    6. Choose a single line of dialog that you find to be the most significant/impactful line in the film and why. You can be a little loose with the “single line” bit, but let’s not go for Maleficent’s entire monologue to Philip... Rather, something like Stitch’s “This is my family. I found it all on my own. It’s little, and broken, but still good. Yeah – still good.” (brb weeping).
    Usually it’s hard for me to find one but this time I actually had too many I wanted to talk about. There were so many good ones. I decided to go with King Candys words: “Do you know what the hardest part of being a king is? Doing what’s right, no matter what.” And his line about heroes making though choices is trying to deliver the same message. I think that although he is a villain, his word were very true. If taken out of the context, those can be wise words. But here they are used as a very dangerous and evil weapon. King Candy knows how to use words well. Although how they all treated Vanellope might have been a hint for Ralph that this could be a trap but in Ralphs place, I would have fallen for that trap and acted the same. Good thing that Ralph noticed things and went straight back to set things right. And that’s why he deserves his medal.

    7. What is this film’s overall goal? Is it to teach a specific lesson (what is it) or get an emotional response (such as)? Or both? And how well or poorly does the film succeed in that goal? Be specific!
    It tells about not to judge by looks – but it’s a bit different this time. It’s more about labels. As the Zombie said at the beginning, labels don’t make you happy. They are limiting your possibilities.
    I think it’s also about the importance of friends and friendship and that acts speak louder than words, like how Ralph went to free Vanellope with the fixed cart, to show her that he knows he made a mistake and is fixing it. Friends are friends and we do what we think is best for them.
    It also tells that we shouldn’t be afraid to go out of our comfortzone and seek the things we want.

    8. What connections or progressions do you see in this film to past films? Example: how does Sleeping Beauty progress (or digress?) the princess archetype built in Cinderella? Be specific! Also, consider what use there is in returning to or re-imagining those elements?
    When Vanellope becomes a princess again, she certainly looked a bi like the Beast transforming back into a human. The movie also changed its view maybe even mocked a little the classic princess modell. Vanellope is not at all like Snow White or Ariel. She is a kid, not a teen, she is lively, she is active and is interested inracing – something not necessarily connected to princesses or even females. She prefers comfortable clothes over princess clothes. She actively tries to achieve her dream but there isn’t much she can do but hide until Ralph cames along. (Bullies wreck her kart so she can’t race and before that she had no chanche to get a gold coin.)
    It explored the judging others part like previous movies like Beauty and the Beast and The Hunchback of Notre-Dame and others. Like The emperors new Groove and Lilo and Stich on the friendship of the two main characters but it is very different from the previous friendships.

    9. What is the iconic shot of the film? What single frame of animation do you find to be the most memorable and why? Post it! You can check out this link to find some great screencaps to help!
    Vanellopes and Ralph signature on the cart might be an odd choice but those signatures kind of seal their friendship, the main focus of the movie and it also reflects their personalities.
    [​IMG]

    10. What single pin do you think best represents this film for you? Why? Give us the pin number and post a picture!
    I actually wanted one with only the medal Vanellope gave to Ralph, this is the closest to that.
    Pin 128202 WDI - Heroines - Vanellope Von Schweets

    [​IMG]


    Stray thoughts:

    More like all the other lines I wanted to analyse. I loved what the Zombie said at the beginning. “Labels don’t make you happy” and “You must love you” They are also part of the message of the film, like don’t let labels limit what you do (both Ralph and Vanellope proved it) And also you must love yourself as a bad guy (for Ralph) to accept things and fix things so he can be happy but the others can be happy, too.
    Another one of my favourites was “If that jid loves me, how bad can I be?” It shows that he achieved his goal and is at peace with himself.
     
    Last edited: Dec 13, 2018
  11. Meritre

    Meritre Well-Known Member

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    Finals can wait, the more for me to read, the better *is really selfish - the end of the challenge comes closer and closer :( *

    I realised the very same thing during this watch.

    I'd like to believe that he really changed. I think he taught the other Nicelanders about what he learned during his trip to the other games and hand in that they are all get along well now (Ralph gets a pie, a real home and the throwing off of the building is not only fun because he can see Vanellope but because the attitude of the nicelanders has changed ad well.)

    Another quote I loved from the movie and I think it connect strongly to what Zombie said about labels not making one happy. :) (And I put that in my analysis as a bonus because I knew you already covered that quote :) )
     
  12. Meritre

    Meritre Well-Known Member

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    I have a LOT to add but I'll post it for now - I'm not sure I'll have the time to add everything I want. :( :(

    1. What is your overall impression of the film? Some possible talking points include: what you did or did not like about it; what about the film has stuck with you; what did you find different on this viewing; how would modern audiences respond to this (for the older films)… The list goes on. Hahah!

    When it came out and I saw it for the first time I was really enthusiastic – since I watched it with my sister and I loves that sister bond the movie focused on. I rewatched it quite a few times back then. (Again, hun dub is horrible, the lyrics of Let it go… and I didn’t like the hun singing voice they choose for Elsa but that’s just my personal preference – I’ve seen and heardthe actress on stage and I didn’t like her. But most opinions are positive about her, even international watchers liked her performance – they were lucky they didn’t understand the lyrics)

    But the enthusiasm slowly died down. I still like it but not as much as some of my favourites. It is really beautiful and I like most of the songs and there are some things I really liked how they were done in this movie, like the villain not giving away himself as a villain with his looks. (Unlike Gaston and Vanessa – she actually looks OK but still mean but Gaston is simply ugly in my opinion.) I really like the character designs for this movie.


    2. Choose one specific character to analyze. You can explore how a character acts, what they say, how they dress, etc. to explain what they may represent or their function and meaning in the narrative. Try to avoid obvious "plot" stuff (ex: the Evil Queen is a villain, so her purpose is to be bad...), but explore unique and specific elements about the character (ex: the EQ is surrounded by images of peacocks, further suggesting her obsession with vanity). You may also use these elements to explain why you connected or disconnected from the character.
    I have a friend (also found through this forum) with whom we talked a lot about Elsa so I’m going with her. Unlike for previous heroines and princesses, she has to fight her inner demons to get her happy ending. (I know there is Hans but Anna is there to deal with him) I thought her fears and her personality very relateable.
    I think the gloves help to keep her powers in check because she believes they can. But towards the end she even freezes her way out of the chains. (They must have been there for an emergency. Still, it’s really scary.)
    Her off shoulder dress (or should I say dresses, there are more in the shorts) represent her becoming free.
    Also, her hair was tied up in a bun bit when she “lets it go” and becomes somewhat free her hair is freed, too.


    3. Choose one specific scene or sequence to analyze—tell me what response is it trying to evoke from the viewer and how does it go about getting that response? Your analysis could include the scene’s use of color, action, camera angles, music, character development, setting, backdrop, style, etc. If you can justify it with evidence from the scene, then it’s an analysis!

    It’s a really short par but I think it’s really effective. This scene shows Elsas fears not only with her walking up and down and muttering to herself but also the colors, the sharp new parts that grow in her castle


    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]


    4. Choose one song to analyze—tell me what response is it trying to evoke from the viewer and how does it go about getting that response? What purpose does this song have in the film and does it succeed in that purpose?
    For the first time in forever tells us more about Anna and how she feels about the whole situation. It also shows her dreams and we also learn about her sisters fears and feelings about the coronation and their situation.


    5. Choose one specific symbol in the film to analyze. A symbol is typically something inanimate, an object, rather than a character. So don’t say “Brer Bear represents dumb people,” as that’s more of a character analysis than a symbol. Rather, think about specific objects (jewelry, clothing, houses, food, weapons, etc.) What does this symbol mean and how does that meaning impact the film?
    The two dolls of the princesses stand for their relationship, their strong bond that they were able to restore as even many years later. When Elsa moves out from their shared room, she takes the Anna doll:
    [​IMG]
    And the Elsa doll stays with Anna.
    [​IMG]
    I guess the doll is later returned to Anna - they became more and more distant.
    [​IMG]

    6. Choose a single line of dialog that you find to be the most significant/impactful line in the film and why. You can be a little loose with the “single line” bit, but let’s not go for Maleficent’s entire monologue to Philip... Rather, something like Stitch’s “This is my family. I found it all on my own. It’s little, and broken, but still good. Yeah – still good.” (brb weeping).
    “Elsa, you can’t run from this” Just like the line I choose for Wreck-it Ralph, it comes from a villain that says it with ill intentions but it has actually a lot of truth in it. Elsa is better off facing her fears than running away. And she doesn't have to do that alone.

    7. What is this film’s overall goal? Is it to teach a specific lesson (what is it) or get an emotional response (such as)? Or both? And how well or poorly does the film succeed in that goal? Be specific!
    It went and turned the don’t judge by looks teaching around, this time we didn’t have an ugly character with a golden heart but a good looking one who’s the villain. It’s one of the things I really liked about this movie.
    I also think it teaches that you have to be at peace with yourself, you have to accept yourself to be happy. (And sometimes there is a prince charming helping with that, sometimes a friend, sometimes a relative)

    8. What connections or progressions do you see in this film to past films? Example: how does Sleeping Beauty progress (or digress?) the princess archetype built in Cinderella? Be specific! Also, consider what use there is in returning to or re-imagining those elements?

    It is based on a fairytale like many other movies but with a new type of main character – Anna is surprisingly clumsy, very trusting and doesn’t really know how to go on in the world. But she has a heart of gold, like all princesses.
    I think the Princess movie this one is most connected to is Tangled – not only because the animation style is similar and Rapunzel makes an appearance but because both Elsa and Rapunzel spent a lot of time alone shut up in a room.

    9. What is the iconic shot of the film? What single frame of animation do you find to be the most memorable and why? Post it! You can check out this link to find some great screencaps to help!

    One oft he most beautiful moments oft he movie, I think.

    [​IMG]


    10. What single pin do you think best represents this film for you? Why? Give us the pin number and post a picture!

    I wasn’t really happy with any oft he pins but since the most important part of the movei was the relationship between the sisters, I choose a pin with them.

    Pin 97850 Anna & Elsa Jeweled Snowflake Pin

    [​IMG]


    Runner up is this one:

    Pin# 131707 ACME/HotArt - Trading - Elsa

    [​IMG]

    I can’t really explain but it has that something I miss from all the other pins.


    Stray thoughts:

    King Agnarr and Queen Iduna need to attend a course so they learn about parenting. Locking up your daughter is definitely not the right way to deal with the problem. I’m a bit harsh but to me it looked like they didn’t really hendle the problem well, especially the king. But I guess Elsa herself is at fault, too, for shutting herself up and sending Anna away. But I guess she got this idea she is dangerous from her parents?

    I’m also curious why the sisters didn’t talk through the door? That would have been safe.

    I thought that "Love is an open door" is wholly Annas creation. It's what love means for her - her sister opening the door she's been knosking at for so many years.

    I feel lik a Let it go reprise with Anna (like in the Broadway version) would have been a great addition to the movie. So we all could fell that now Elsa can really let it go.

    Does anybody have a good explanation for this picture? Why is he smiling? It looks like a genuine smile to me, and it looks like he thinks she is quite a nice girl. There was no one around for whom he had to pretend to be nice. I’m confused.

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Dec 17, 2018
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  13. timeerkat

    timeerkat Your Friend Who Likes To Play

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    288   0   0

    [​IMG]

    1. Frozen is a decently solid movie, one that I enjoy watching from time to time. The songs are really catchy and lyrically clever and the animation is complex (though having visited Norway in person earlier this year, it doesn't quite catch the absolute stunning majesty of the countryside, but it would be pretty impossible to do that without actually just seeing it in person). I love the focus on the relationship and love between sisters.

    They did an amazing job at animating expression. I mean, just look at this shot. You can feel the fear and anticipation radiating off of her.

    [​IMG]

    And the confusion and heartache here, after Elsa tells her to leave.

    [​IMG]

    Disney once again included the now seemingly obligatory "Let's poke fun at ourselves! See kids, we're cool and can totally take a joke at our own expense!" with the notion of not marrying a man you just met and other characters almost offended that Anna could do that.

    One point that I think gets overlooked is how the film shows the effect of a child's illness on their sibling (not that Elsa's powers are an illness, but they act as a pretty good stand-in). A lot of attention is focused on the child who is affected, but Frozen shows the effect on Anna of all this attention to Elsa. She is shown as feeling forgotten, lonely, and ignored, with no one to voice these feelings to. Elsa being locked away caused her to be locked away as well, but with no context for why. As a result, she developed into a fiercely independent person, but one that doesn't have a lot of coping skills for life outside of the castle walls.



    5.
    [​IMG]

    Elsa's ice castle is a positive product of her powers - one of the first conduits she has to channel her power into without her fearing that she will harm anyone. It also acts as her sanctuary from the outside world. With it being secluded up in the mountains, there is no one around for her to hurt, but also no one around to hurt her. She grew up constantly being told that her power is dangerous and treated like a monster or at least capable of accidentally performing monstrous acts. She was locked away by her parents with no say in the matter. By being alone of her own volition, she finally was able to feel free. She could make her own decisions and could be in the wide open at last.

    The castle also gives the movie a chance to play with the symbolic meaning of certain colors. Traditionally, red stands for anger and yellow for fear. In this film, those are flipped. When Anna confronts Elsa in her ice castle, the sunset causes the background to glow red, reflecting Elsa's growing fear of hurting Anna.

    [​IMG]

    As Elsa worries more and more about what has happened, the castle itself is a brilliant red.

    [​IMG]

    Still later, when Hans and the two young men from Wesselton burst in to Elsa's castle, the background is glowing yellow, to reflect Elsa's anger.

    [​IMG]


    6. "Some people are worth melting for."

    This line embodies the spirit of the film. The film plays on various types of love - familial love, romantic love, and love between friends. This line conveys that these types of love besides romantic love can be just as powerful. Olaf and Anna are friends, but their love is still strong enough that Olaf is willing to risk his life for her.


    9. My iconic shot is the act of true love, when Anna saves Elsa from Hans with her last dying breath.

    [​IMG]


    I have to include this shot, too.

    [​IMG]

    All through her childhood Elsa was kept locked away due to her powers. Now, on the first day of freedom she's had in nearly two decades, her powers caused a literal barrier between her and everyone else. This is such a subtle touch but it is very impactful.

    10. There is no pin of my iconic shot (which is a shame, because I think an ice Anna would actually make a pretty gorgeous pin if done correctly), so I went with a pin that shows the two sisters loving each other (and actually looking at each other! So many pins of the two of them have their backs to each other.). I particularly like this pin because it has the word "friendship" on it as well.

    [​IMG]

    Pin# 129620 - SDR - Pin Trading Fun Day 2018 - Frozen Friendship - Anna & Elsa Only

    Random Thoughts

    ~ Why was Elsa required to remove her gloves during the ceremony? Is there a mandate that all new leaders must hold the scepter and orb with their bare hands? The staff knew about her powers, so you would think they could make a concession for her.

    ~ The trolls are JERKS! Did they actually kidnap Kristoff? And why did you leave in memories of the fun times if Elsa was just going to be locked away, causing Anna to think she did something wrong for her fun sister to suddenly be hiding from her. I solidly stand behind the theory that Hans did love Anna until her visit with the trolls, who used their magic to corrupt him so that she would end up with Kristoff after all.

    ~ If the cold never bothered her anyway, why does Elsa have a blanket on her in the prison cell? (I do like the little detail of not seeing her breath while she's in the cold, though.)

    ~ Wow, the townspeople must REALLY have trusted Hans. He came into the room and told them that Anna was dead, and not one person went to go check on her. He told them that they got married first and they all just believe him.

    ~ The part at the end where it was declared that Arendelle would no longer be doing trade with Wesselton was played for laughs, but earlier it was established that Wesselton was Arendelle's biggest trade partner. I really hope that whatever they received in trade was easily obtained from their other trading partners, otherwise they may have screwed themselves over for the sake of pettiness.
     
    Last edited: Dec 16, 2018
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  14. Meritre

    Meritre Well-Known Member

    Rating - 100%
    2   0   0

    Well chosen picture :) :) :D

    I like this explanation, I'll take it. I dislike those trolls.

    I think she even had a song about it that she wants to be more than the neglected, 'spare' child. It was deleted later though.

    I think Wesselton was depending more on Arendelle than the other way around - the duke said he wants to explit its riches when he arriwed at the beginning of he movie. But I agree, it was played for laughs.

    I read somewhere that the crew was sent to Norway to study the country. I don't know who took part in that trip though. :)
     
    Last edited: Dec 17, 2018
  15. timeerkat

    timeerkat Your Friend Who Likes To Play

    Rating - 100%
    288   0   0

    1. I friggin' love this movie, y'all. But I don't think that's a surprise. The theme of the movie, the voice acting, the animation, the creativity in the settings, and even the villain reveal were all handled wonderfully. The world is set up naturally (expository dialogue can be tiresome but putting it into the context of Ralph telling his story during Bad-Anon and Sonic giving "gaming tips" in Game Central Station was very creative.)

    Oh GOSH the wordplay. This movie was full of "dad joke" levels of word play, and I love every one. The cops as donuts, Devil Dogs, Nesquicksand, etc.

    Again, the animation blows me away. There were more new difficult things to animate - translucent gumdrops, nesquick powder, taffy, all of the textures and opacities of the various candies, the gigantic swarms of cybugs, etc. Characters from different games, or even characters within the same game but at a different "level" have very distinct movements - Tapper moves differently than Gene, who moves differently than QBert. And Ralph and Felix (main characters) move differently than Gene, Mary, and the other Nicelanders (secondary characters). Characters in newer games have more fluid movement and more complex character design than ones from older games - even Felix himself notices this when he sees Calhoun and says "Look at that high definition!". Look at this shot of Calhoun, Felix, and Vanellope. Vanellope has more details and definition than Felix, and Calhoun is a step above Vanellope.

    [​IMG]

    They also took great care with the small details. There are too many to list here, but one of my favorites is that at the beginning once the arcade closes, Ken and Ryu mention going to Tapper's. Later on, when Ralph is at Tapper's, you can see Ryu in the background finishing up his drink. I love that they modified the Walt Disney Studios logo and Steamboat Willie musical clip into an 8-bit version, so even before the movie starts you are brought into the world of video games.

    They also did a service of exposing the audience to the feelings and experiences of "bad guys." When we play a video game, it is easy to just play through and not give a a second thought to the "bad guys" and how they experience the world. They are just an obstacle to get through on the way to winning the game. This movie humanized them, and brought them to our level.

    2. Felix is indeed set up to be the "good guy" by virtue of the game in which he is a part of. He is the main character (the only playable character in the game, actually), who the game is named after, and the entire story of his game revolves around him. The player's goal is to fix the building, and so sets up the fixer as the hero. He has gone with his programming the entire time, since he didn't have a reason *not* to before now.

    I look at Felix as being representative of privilege in our society. When you are the default "good" as deemed by society, you can go through life as is. You don't have a need to question society, since it benefits you. You can afford to have blinders on (and, if you are surrounded by others within the same bubble of privilege, you may not even know that you have those blinders on, as everything around you enforces this worldview) . Only by being exposed to what marginalized people are going through does this bubble start to burst.

    Ralph changing the status quo by leaving the game, causing Felix to go after him (it's in his programming to "fix what Ralph wrecks") and to finally see the outside world and to see things from Ralph's perspective. Once that happens and he is outside of that bubble, treated by King Candy in Sugar Rush just like Ralph is treated in Fix-It Felix Jr., he can see things from Ralph's point of view. After he has this realization, he uses his power to help improve Ralph's life.

    We can see this in our society as a whole. There have been many times where someone is firmly against a cause until they or someone they know is personally affected by it, after which time they support it because they now know firsthand the consequences of said problem. (Think of all the times that a politician, say, was against stem-cell research until a family member becomes ill, or support anti-LGBT legislation until a family member comes out.)


    5. Choose one specific symbol in the film to analyze. A symbol is typically something inanimate, an object, rather than a character. So don’t say “Brer Bear represents dumb people,” as that’s more of a character analysis than a symbol. Rather, think about specific objects (jewelry, clothing, houses, food, weapons, etc.) What does this symbol mean and how does that meaning impact the film?

    [​IMG]

    Ralph's goal through the movie is to bring a medal home to Gene to prove that "bad guys can win medals, too" and improve his lot in life. The first medal, and the one he's so focused on getting back, was one he had to essentially steal from another game. It took no heroic effort on his part to achieve. This medal, however, was one that was made specifically for him. While the Medal of Heroes is bright and shiny and impressive-looking, this medal from Vanellope was made because he did do something heroic in her eyes - he befriended her when no one else would (and are actually actively hunting her down) and helped her try and reach her own goal of becoming a racer. This turns on its head the notion that being a hero takes some huge showy effort. You can be a hero just by being a "good guy" and doing the right thing for one person.


    7. This film has the express goal of teaching that "good guy" and "bad guy" are not black and white, and there is a lot of nuance to the people behind those labels.

    Felix is the "good guy" but his naivety and privilege cause him to neglect Ralph during their game.

    Ralph is the "bad guy" but has a good heart, and his wrecking even leads to creation or positive things in some instances (like when he built Vanellope a race track or broke Felix out of the Fungeon).

    King Candy is a villain hiding in plain sight as a "good guy."

    Vanellope is treated as a "bad guy" by the other characters due to Turbo's tampering but is in actuality an equal to the other Sugar Rush racers.


    9. Man, it's actually hard for me to pick this, since multiple things in this movie could be iconic shots for me. But I'll go with this, as it incorporates my symbol :

    [​IMG]

    This is the low point in the movie - Ralph thinks he has lost the only friend he has because he was trying to save her and his own game has been abandoned. This reminds him that he actually can be capable of being a hero, and starts his upswing into saving the day.


    [​IMG]

    HAHAHA!!!!! Besides being a wonderfully framed shot, I love this because it pokes fun at the sappy "just fallen in love" actions in previous movies. The environment is singing a bubbly love song, making itself into hearts, etc. to celebrate new love, while Felix and Calhoun are looking around like the world has gone crazy.

    10. There are a bunch of pins I love (mainly all the Felix ones), but this one I think has one of the strongest messages about the film:
    [​IMG]
    Pin# 127052 - Once Upon A Time - Pin of the Month - Wreck It Ralph

    To borrow a theme from Princess and the Frog, this pin represents what Ralph wants (a better life; the party scene on the left is what kicks off his journey to get a medal) and what he actually needs (a friend, shown by Vanellope on the right)


    Bonus pin:

    This pin kind of reminds me of a character selection screen in a video game:

    [​IMG]
    Pin# 112998 - DSSH - Character Block - Wreck it Ralph


    Random Thoughts

    ~ I laughed really hard when Calhoun delivers her chicken hawk in a coop line, and Felix is confused. Calhoun's line sounds just like something Kenneth on 30 Rock would say; Kenneth is played by Jack McBrayer, who did the voice of Felix. Something about a Kenneth-like line making Kenneth confused just delights me.

    ~ One of the few non-video game brands featured in the movie is Subway. I know that Subway did Wreck-It Ralph kids meals for the first movie, so I wonder if they had some sort of sponsorship deal ("Put us in your kids meal and we'll put you in the movie" kind of thing).



    Gotta run out the door now, but I have some more things that I'll post in a bit.
     
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  16. coblj003

    coblj003 DPF Charter Member DPF Correspondent

    Rating - 100%
    26   0   0

    Wreck it Ralph
    [​IMG]
    1. Overall Impressions
    As a kid who grew up in the 90's, Wreck it Ralph definitely plays on the Video Game Arcade nostalgia feel, as such many of the people I've talked to on this site either love or hate this movie, I definitely go for the former. After High School, my brother and I even went into collecting Arcade Cabinets and Hardware as Liquidation auctions at that time made getting into the hobby then very affordable; though supply and demand has pretty much dried up the well so to speak and prices have soared due to the advent of online sales. That said, the Arcade scene of today has pretty much imploded due to the rise and popularity of the home consoles; as such many stand alone arcade's and developers have shuttered(hence liquidation auctions) leaving only a select redemption(Chuckie Cheese, Dave &Busters) or retro scene(think Disney Quest) style arcades in it's wake. As such, the premise behind Litwak's Arcade does a similar job a recreating that Family Amusement style complex in that there isn't an otherwise viable way of maintaining an arcade today, I recall a similar place along the freeway in Chula Vista that also had Go-Kart and Minigolf.

    In addition to all the Video-game cameos, Disney decided to have several conversion games based on popular Nintendo titles. Fix-it Felix Jr. itself is based heavily on Donkey King, from Arcade cab design's shape and color, to it's gameplay. Ralph very much acts in similar mannerism to DK, while homage is given to Mario, who ironically is one of the injured faces that Felix makes to get out of the Nes-quicksand. Sugar Rush itself is very much based off the Mario Kart Series, even including it's own version of Rainbow Road. Hero's Duty(it's title a play on the Call of Duty series) itself get's much of inspiration from the Metroid Series, though I tend to see a bit of Inspiration from other Arcade shoot-em up title's such as SNK's Metal Slug.

    I do find for all it's VG inclusion from popular series(Pacman, Super Mario, Sonic the Hedgehog, and Street Fighter), several had to altered drastically due to lisencing or other factors. It is said that Don Bluth declined a Dirk the Daring Cameo though his Arcade Cab makes an appearance complete with ingame screens(though the Marquee is blurred out). TMNT(as published by Konami) makes an appearance in the flashback scene though it's most likely that Nickelodeon/Disney decided against an actual in-movie cameo. There is also notable mentions of several name conversions such as the controversial shooter Lethal Enforcer(Fatal Assault) and equally controversial fighter Mortal Kombat 3(Undead Apocalypse 3).

    The Wreck it Ralph movie is a style juxtaposition in comparison Toy Story/Who Framed Roger Rabbit, it meshes many different IP's as well as breaking the fourth wall in how the VG Player interacts on the character's level. The art direction was interesting blend of what was further Pixar/Disney meshing but was an interesting interpretation of in game physics with "2D -Sprite" (basic frame stuttering/exaggerated pixel-block design ) in comparison to the high definition 3D models (smooth and more lifelike). My only realist plot criticism is mainly how each game connects via electricity, but it is easy to look past for the sake of the movie; it is actually realistic that an arcade machine would have its current data settings such as high scores or time unlocked features(such as additional characters) reset/erase any saved data if it turned off/unplugged. The storyline itself is well thought out and captivating, though it is easy to follow what is missed if one sees it a second time around. Interestingly, the plot points focus on relateable topics such as Bullying, Loneliness, Dead-end Job, Homelessness, Midlife Crisis, etc... The Soundtrack was an interesting blend of Video-game Style Music created exclusively for this movie in the era they were created(with one exception). I may be biased but I give this a 5/5 stars as it's one of the few Disney Films past/current I choose to watch at any given moment.

    2. Character Analysis
    [​IMG]
    I'm going to go ahead and try to explain the character designs behind Disney's original characters during the Bad Anon group; I know there are a lot of game discussions involving them but I'll I try to keep them at an arcade game level that may or may not reflect Disney's interpretation.
    • Saitine follows the generic Devil Himself character design though his appearance doesn't necessarily correspond to known games; his costume later makes a cameo appearance in Fred's room in Big Hero 6 meaning Disney holds the exclusive design. His name pronunciation is actually Engrish(misspelling gaffs common in Japanese game translations) of Satan, probably Satin, otherwise it would have been pronounced Sah-Tahn... [​IMG]
    • 1011001 is the yellow robot, his name actually meaning yellow in binary and is the 2nd costume to get a cameo in BH6. Based on his caricature at Tappers, he may be based on the robotic antagonists of Robotron 2084, a terminator like game that used simplistic pixel shapes to respresent the killer robots denoted only by their colors, yellow/red. [​IMG] [​IMG]
    • Cyborg is clearly the character Kano from Mortal Kombat, of which Warner Brothers currently own the rights to. Most likely Disney had recieved the initial licensing from Midway games before the rights were sold-off in mid-development, hence the modification. His voice seems to be based off his movie version rather then in-game voice, quite similar to Zangeif's portrayal. [​IMG]
    • The Eye of the Beholder is a unique creature from the Dungeons and Dragon Series, though changed slightly due to licensing. [​IMG]
    • Shinobi's inclusion is actually as a replacement character; initially the sneak previews at D23 had Dr. Wily from Megaman though he was later replaced later in development. The ninja takes his spot in the lineup and if you look closely the character moves very much in the same manner(arms firmly elevated at the side) as the mad scientist. Shinobi's Tapper caricature though is reminiscent of the title screen from Sega's Shinobi. Fans speculate that Capcom had rescinded any Mega-Man contracts as the creator had recently left the company though it's more likely the Bad Anon cast was already becoming heavily Capcom represented and was trying to limit licensing fees. [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG]
    • The Sorceress is an interesting inclusion though there is much a debate about just who she is inspired by. Given that her original design had her as a vamptress with bat wings, it gives an idea that she may be based off of Capcom's Morrigan Aensland, a succubus fighter from the Darkstalker series. She was probably a bit too Risqué for Disney's taste ushering a more conservative Jessica Rabbit redesign(if you can call it that), before also removing her bat wings as well. Her final color palette seems to be borrowed from her other-self, Lilith. [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG]
    3. Scene Analysis/Music Analysis
    The Hero's Duty Sequence is very interesting to me as it very much shares very much the same structure as popular shoot-em ups, title Metal Slug. In most Arcade titles, there is a usually a basic How to Play sequence before you are given an "easy" level to practice (hence why the player calls it a ripoff after only just starting). Most arcade games though aren't called quarter munchers for nothing and I was aghast that one play cost a dollar, though I concede most redemption arcades are somewhat on the expensive side. On a similar note, I love Skrillex' rendition of the shoot-em up theme which is generally fast paced and meant to give the player a sense of a fast but steady procession forward. The reason I mention Metal Slug is that it is plays very similar to this track.


    5. Quote
    [​IMG]
    Props go to M. Bison's quote of "you're not thinking of going turbo, are you". This has the sense of breaking the nostalgia 4th wall to the audience as the game Street Fighter 2 Turbo is seen as the pinnacle version in that series in the Arcade.

    8. Progressions.
    One of the progressions that Wreck it Ralph shares with Princess and the Frog is when Ralph returns to his game and finds it empty of its inhabitants, bar Gene who is downing a last martini before abandoning the game as well before handing the key's to Ralph. In this regard, Ralph's situation mimicks the last phrase the voodoo spirits utter(You Got What You Wanted, But You Lost What Had) in that he got his medal and right to live in the penthouse suite but lost his friends, neighbors, and at the moment his game/home in the process...

    9. Iconic Scene
    [​IMG]
    My Iconic scene is the end moment that Ralph is heading toward Diet Cola Mountain. In such he recites the Bad Guy Affirmation clutching his Earned medal in which he actually fulfills his greatest desire of becoming a hero to save his first true friend from being erased at the greatest risk of his life. Quintessentially it mimicks's the pose of a Shoryuken uppercut, which is one of the moves Street Fighter's Ryu, whom Ralph/Vanellope later share the ending bonus game scene with.
    [​IMG]

    (Cont.)
     
    Last edited: Dec 20, 2018
  17. coblj003

    coblj003 DPF Charter Member DPF Correspondent

    Rating - 100%
    26   0   0

    (Cont.)
    10. Representative pin
    [​IMG]
    Pin 93603 DisneyStore.com -Pixelated Wreck-It Ralph Jumbo Pin

    I was actually wanting to get a pin featuring Ralph's Street fighter pose, but as there wasn't any I decided to go with this pose instead. Ironically I feel it goes well with this street fighter set I bought from thinkgeek if I replace Ralph in with either Chun li or Ryu...
    [​IMG]

    Stray Thoughts

    I think the Short Paperman deserves a special shoutout as it won the oscar for best animated short. While it followed Pixars standard of having an accompanying company short(till Coco), it showed that Disney was on the ball on becoming the premier animation company.

    As we continue on to Frozen I think it would be good to point out that the whac a mole game, which is licensed and shown as that in the Litwak arcade concept art has been changed to a Future Frozen reference, Wak a Troll...

    [​IMG]

    So here we are back to to the blockbuster Disney hit of the last decade, Frozen. Ironically I feel that it's appropriate to Analyze being that it is the almost the Winter Solstice.

    [​IMG]
    1. Initial Impressions
    So I think that I put this movie in the back of our movie shelf after my oldest watched it repeatedly, It was interesting to pull it out of hiding after several years. I think the movie was definitely one of the most Over Hyped Disney Films of the past few years, Yes it was good but was it "that" good. While I have watched this to death with my oldest, my youngest doesn't get to see it that much(being in Bluray Purgatory), so in essense we got to see it a bit new for the first time all over again. I will say this, the first Anna's Solo(Do you want to build a Snowman?) piqued her interest and it was kinda of heart breaking to see her jaw drop at the "Disney" Moment.
    It is interesting to get another 3D princess Movie after Tangled(so three new Princess films in less then a decade, genius or scrapping the creative bottom of the barrel). As a father of two daughters, the main arc that jumped out at me was the interaction between the two sisters and how it compares to how my daughters interact with each other. It was interesting in a comical sort of way to see how the characters interact with each other, it felt like they were naturally having fun rather then in a cohesive sort of way. The Art Direction is pretty unique and the behind the scenes offer of glimpse of how their computer programming pulled off all the clear Icicle creations. Musically, The songs and score complement each other perfectly, though my main criticism(not Elsa's Solo done to death) is that it feels the layout of the songs seem slightly skewed as the end does not seem to offer any sung reprisals outside of the Norwegian chant. Overall I rate it a 4.5/5 stars

    2. Character Analysis/4. Song Analysis
    Whilst this movie mostly circles around Anna, Elsa is far from being in the corner, illuminating every scene she is in. I see similarities in how she is living with anxiety due to her traumatic experience with her powers and my oldest who also suffers a bit from Anxiety; they both have a certain quirk that she must learn to overcome but at the same time uses similar coping mechanisms(mantras, certain objects, daily routines, etc). As for her break out song, It is quite obvious from the internet spreading this song around like wild fire that they made this with every intention of becoming a viral sensation(especially considering the chops of Idina Menzel). It's weird that when the first trailer for Frozen came out it was immediately reported for plagiarism. I am not accusing as such, it could be just the style but find very coincidental that the piano riff sounds very similar the intro of Tales of Phantasia for the PlayStation(Ironically this game also features a story arc featuring an area of Eternal Winter), except only in a minor key; the ending note even touches upon a similar hold stylistically.


    3. Scene Analysis.
    The final Scene of the Snow/Ice thawing of Arendelle, is one of the most captivating images that the ice thaws as quickly as it had appeared. The scene itself very much reminds me of the ending to Final Fantasy VII, where Aerith's White Materia awakens to cleanse the planet of the horrific effects of the Comet. The scene in question is as it passes through the town of Kalm, the rooftops/window shutters looking quite similar to the ones shown in Arrendelle. Quintessentially, Wreck it Ralph has a cameo quote of FFVII shown in the Pacman subway entrance Game Central, "Aerith Lives"...


    7. Meaning of the Movie. 8. Progressions
    I think that ultimately, this movie pushes the boundaries that a Princess Movie is online about finding true love and instead a little about healing the bonds bonds between sisters. Love will thaw a frozen heart, shares it meaning with the the live action remake Maleficient, who ends up kissing Princess Aurora on the forehead after repeatedly trying to break the curse otherwise set up upon by her(and allowing the curse to be broken).

    9. Iconic Scene
    [​IMG]
    My favorite scene is of Anna and Kristoff walking through the frozen forest, completely in awe of the beautiful surroundings. It actually reminds me of when we had a really frozen/icy winter here in Southern Illinois when it happened in February/March and the berries on the trees were frozen red in the sunlight.

    10. Representative Pin

    Pin 106713 DLP - Let It Snow - Frozen pin event - Anna & Elsa Locket

    [​IMG]
    As the movie primarily deals with the rekindling of the sisterly bond between Anna/Elsa, I thought it appropriate that the pin featured that. This is one of the more unique styles rather then just the two of them plastered next to each other holding hands or facing each other and actually features a touching moments of the film.
     
    Last edited: Dec 21, 2018
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  18. unibear

    unibear DPF Charter Member DPF Charter Member

    Rating - 100%
    51   0   0

    This was another really good installment of the whole Disney Princesses saga, and another continuation of the “I must have every pin from this movie when they come out, even if they cost thousands of dollars!”


    1. My overall impression of the movie… Several things:
    • The whole idea that Elsa’s powers are controlled by her emotions was explored heavily in the TV series “Charmed”, in which three sister-witches with magical powers fought demons. There were several instances in that show of how the sisters’ emotions ultimately affected their supernatural powers.
    • Why did the trolls keep Kristoff and Sven instead of trying to get them back to their family? Not exactly the behavior of “love experts”…
    • Elsa running away to be alone in the mountains feels like every kid who runs away from home for being different (gay, trans, etc.) and is heartbreaking: “I belong here—alone—where I can be who I am without hurting anybody… Yes, I’m alone but I’m alone and free!”
    • Olaf has a LOT of “grab my butt” jokes throughout the movie.
    • Anna’s “death” is another one of those fake deaths that Disney still likes to play for real (like Eugene in “Tangled”), which again diminishes the actual deaths like Ray in “Princess and the Frog”.
    • OK, “Let It Go” was a national and international CULTURAL EVENT. I wish I could dump on this song, but it’s spectacular and it deserved the acclaim. Idina Menzel is an excellent singer!!! I just have to plug this remake from Caleb Hyles (a male vocalist on par with Idina) and the “duet” spliced together from these songs. Both of these versions still give me goose bumps when I hear them. Enjoy!





    2. and 8. The character I really wanted to analyze was Kristoff or maybe Sven. But as I watched it, I felt like I had to choose Hans. I find that he is a hard character to understand, in part because the way he is presented changes so drastically (and dramatically) in a single second. The writers went full out to make him a noble hero, a prince who (at least it seemed) genuinely made a connection with Princess Anna, complete with requisite Disney Princess love song “Love is an Open Door”. In this song, he’s nice and charming and finds Anna’s quirks to be endearing. After their announcement and the escape of Elsa, Hans still plays the concerned hero very well—he is gallant and noble and selfless to Anna and the people of Arendelle and this is seen in his handing out blankets and opening the castle with offers of free hot soup. He even goes after Anna to save her after her horse returns without her—and the writers paint a parallel to Belle (the heroine) who goes searching for her father after Phillippe returns without him. Even when they go searching for Anna and confront Elsa, Hans is noble and caring when he tells Elsa (who is about to kill the Duke’s henchmen), “Queen Elsa. Don’t be the monster they fear you are!” And later, when he tells Elsa, “I couldn’t just let them kill you,” to which Elsa replies, “But I’m a danger to Arendelle.” Again, so far, he’s a Disney Prince through-and-through—noble, fair, kind, loving, and selfless.

    Then in a hearbeat, when Anna is returned nearly frozen and needing a “true love” to save her… He turns into a monster! “Oh, Anna. If only there was someone out there who loved you.” OUCH!! Suddenly, Hans is cruel, dismissive, and judgmental of Anna’s need for love and attention and is a selfish jerk only looking out for his OWN needs. Then he proceeds, like a James Bond villain, to outline his nefarious plans to take over Arendelle and become the king that he could never be, as the last of 13 brothers, in the Southern Isles. This change feels so abrupt (as I’m sure it’s meant to), and the writers really played us all for fools up until this point to maximize the impact of his villainy. And I guess it worked, but maybe too well. It just doesn’t seem to fit or work for him. I'm thinking (in contrast) to Mother Gothel in “Tangled”—she was a villain at the start, although she kind of hid it from Rapunzel, so her turning on Rapunzel to her face shocked Rapunzel, but not us. As such, she was a more effective (and believable) villain; because they hid Hans’s ulterior motives from us until over halfway through the film, he just doesn’t feel like an effective (or actual) villain.

    I know the writers gave us a slight hint (if you go back and actually look for it) in Hans’s lyrics in “Love is an Open Door” that is slightly foreboding in retrospect—“I’ve been searching my whole life to find my own place”. Tellingly, Anna’s lyrics are about finding love and Hans’s lyrics are about finding his place in the world. Not necessarily evil, but it does set the stage and hints that the writers were planning this all along. Still, I just don’t really “buy” Hans as a villain…


    3. and 8. The sequence I chose to analyze was the opening scene with the ice harvesters. This starts the movie out by setting the scene of this Norwegian (Arendellian?) Disney movie… Does Disney have a Scandanavian movie? Frozen! Check! As such, this opening scene/song setting the stage for where this movie will be set is a copy of several other Disney movies, including Aladdin (“Arabian Nights” = Arabian movie), Lion King (“Circle of Life” = African movie), and Lilo & Stitch (“He Mele No Lilo” = Hawaiian movie), to name but a few. I guess that puts it in contrast to Disney movies that start with songs that introduce main characters of the movie, including The Little Mermaid (“Fathoms Below”, introducing Prince Eric), Pocahontas (“Virginia Company”, introducing John Smith), Emperor’s New Groove (“Perfect World”, introducing Emperor Kuzco) and Mulan (“Bring Honor to Us All”, introducing Pocahontas). Then, of course, there are the DP movies introducing the story by the use of a book (or stained glass windows), including Snow White, Sleeping Beauty, Beauty and the Beast, Enchanted, etc.

    Anyway, back to the opening scene. This scene sets the plot of the movie in a Scandanavian setting, including the use of authentic (I’m guessing) music, costumes, and behaviors (ice harvesting). The song has a bit of a military march feeling to it, with the pounding of the ice picks and the movement of the ice saws setting the steady beat of a military march. This is matched by the images of a completely male cast of characters working in concert and with the precision of a military operation. As a sideline, it also introduces toddler Sven and Kristoff, which are just about the cutest Disney characters I’ve seen in my lifetime!


    4. Since I didn’t get to analyze Kristoff or Sven in #2, I thought I’d choose to analyze the song, “Reindeers are Better Than People.” I chose this song because it helps demonstrate the true friendship between Kristoff and Sven. It’s such a short song, but it’s pretty cute and sweet. This scene really shows that Kristoff and Sven are on the same “wavelength”, and that Kristoff really seems to know what Sven is thinking. Unlike other films with non-speaking animals (I’m thinking of Pegasus in “Hercules” and Pip in “Enchanted”, to name two), there never really seems to be a scene in the movie where the animal gets frustrated because the human doesn’t quite seem to understand him. Kristoff and Sven seem to be in complete synchronization throughout the entire move. It makes me wonder if the trolls gave Kristoff certain powers so that he could understand Sven (it also makes me wonder if Sven talks around the trolls when it’s just them and Kristoff around…).

    As a side comment, I really like Kristoff’s lines in the movie. Cases in point: (1) In “Reindeers are Better than People”, I love when Kristoff says to Sven, “Ah, thanks buddy,” after Kristoff sings Sven’s lines; (2) I loved Kristoff’s line to Sven after they argue about continuing to help Princess Anna, “Sometimes I really don’t like you”; and (3) After Olaf’s song “In Summer”, when he sings about finally finding out what snow does in summer, Kristoff says, “I’m going to tell him.”

    To be continued below...
     
    Last edited: Dec 20, 2018
  19. unibear

    unibear DPF Charter Member DPF Charter Member

    Rating - 100%
    51   0   0

    5. The symbol I chose to analyze was the strands of white in Anna’s hair. When they were children, Elsa hit Anna by accident, leaving a strand of Anna’s hair white. This was also when Elsa’s trouble began and she began to fear her power and withdraw herself from the world. In this case, the white strand of hair represents a bit of Anna’s heart being frozen/closed off because she was being “frozen out” of her sister’s life. She still had her parents and the staff, but she was definitely affected by her sister’s “coldness”.

    In the strike in the ice castle as adults, Elsa (again accidentally) hits Anna’s heart and her hair starts turning more and more white. Initially, the blow to Anna is from Elsa—again being pushed away from her sister, and frozen out of her sister’s life and heart. Her hair gets even whiter once Hans turns on her, telling her that she is unloved and unlovable, and freezes her out of his life as well.

    EDIT: I also forgot to mention that when Anna returns from her act of true love, her hair has no more white streaks in it, symbolizing that she has finally freed herself of the chilling effect of being frozen out by Elsa, and symbolizing that she is indeed capable of being loved (by Elsa, and presumably Kristoff?).


    6. and 7. (and 8.) So the quote I chose to analyze comes from the Poppa Troll: “There is ice in your heart put there by your sister… Only an act of true love can thaw a frozen heart.” One thing that really annoys me about this movie is the classic misdirection the writers have used on the audience. I already mentioned one case (Hans as a hero vs. Hans as a villain), but here I want to talk about another one—True Love as romantic love vs. True Love as sisterly love. The writers went “all-in” to push this idea that what Anna needs to save her is a “true love’s kiss”—first getting us to believe that Hans could save her, and then when Hans betrays her the writers push hard and heavy (with the help of Olaf) that Anna’s salvation lies in a kiss from Kristoff. The writers also play this heavy, with Kristoff racing on a speeding Sven to save Anna’s life (much like Eugene racing on a speeding Maximus to save Rapunzel’s life), and even the over-the-top heavy-handed “whisper” of Kristoff’s name in the air from Anna.

    Now, to MY interpretation of the two lines from Poppa Troll. Elsa has put ice in Anna’s heart, but I don’t want to focus on the “magical” ice, I want to focus on the “ordinary” ice. By that, I mean that simply by cutting Anna out of her life and her heart, Elsa has “frozen” a part of Anna’s heart and that’s a kind of “ice” anyone of us could put in another person’s heart even if we don’t have magical powers. I’m going to veer off the beaten path for the next line! The whole movie focuses on “unfreezing” Anna’s heart, but in truth, Elsa is the one with the frozen heart. And Poppa Troll is right that the only thing that can thaw ELSA’S frozen heart is a selfless act of true love by ANNA. Anna saved Elsa from Hans’s sword, and this act of love thawed Elsa’s heart and let her see that love is not something to hide from or protect yourself from—and I think this is the message this movie is trying to convey to the audience.


    8. Several similarities to other Disney movies (other than those mentioned above):
    • The sisterly connections between Anna and Elsa (when Elsa allows them to happen) are similar to Nani and Lilo’s interactions in “Lilo & Stitch” and the brothers in “Brother Bear”.
    • Anna living most of her life with a discolored part of her hair is similar to Rapunzel in “Tangled”, and both of them were isolated from a good part of the world during their formative years.
    • You know, you can’t be a Disney Princess (DP) unless you lose at least one of your parents. Just saying…
    • The Duke of Weselton’s two thugs reminded me of the Sluggington Brothers in “Tangled”, and when Hans fought with them against Elsa, it also make Hans feel like Flynn Rider!
    • Anna wakes up looking less than beautiful and elegant. Definitely a look we have never seen on any other DP!
    • Princess Anna falls in love at the drop of a hat (an homage to the earlier DP, I’m sure), but both Elsa and Kristoff scoff at her insane behavior regarding a quick engagement and wedding, mirroring the more recent view of quick love in DP movies.
    • We see a brunette Rapunzel and a well-dressed “Prince?” Eugene entering the castle gates when they open!
    • Anna feels shut out by a cold and distant Elsa, but has no idea why. This is similar to how Bambi felt about his father in “Bambi II” and how Chicken Little felt about his father. Fairy tale folk just need to communicate with each other!
    • Dark forest with snow around = you will be attacked by wolves, at least according to “Beauty and the Beast” and “Frozen”.
    • Sven is very dog-like—not as much as Maximus in “Tangled”, but still…
    • When Elsa says to Anna, “I don’t want to hurt you,” it reminded me of Meg saying, “And I don’t want to hurt you,” to Hercules.
    • Frozen Anna looks an awful lot like the statue of Eric in “The Little Mermaid”, especially with a princess (Elsa or Ariel) holding on to it.


    9. The scene with a heartbroken Elsa holding on to the frozen Anna, and facing her worst fear ever, feels like most iconic scene of the movie.

    [​IMG]


    10. The movie is all about the true love between sisters, so I chose the Beloved Tales pin (110784) showing a happier ending to the sisterly relationship.

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Dec 18, 2018
    Meritre likes this.
  20. unibear

    unibear DPF Charter Member DPF Charter Member

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    Thanks for writing this. I was trying to say something like this, but I couldn't quite articulate it. You nailed it right on the head!
     
  21. Meritre

    Meritre Well-Known Member

    Rating - 100%
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    My language has a separate word for romantic love and other types of love so that didn't really work there :)

    I really likey your interpretation! :) And I think Elsas song called Monster from the Broadway version fits right in - although she's not a monster, she has a frozen heart and she needs saving. Also at the very beginning, they sing "Beware the frozen heart". But whose is the frozen heart?
     
  22. unibear

    unibear DPF Charter Member DPF Charter Member

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    OK, we've got two movies due in by Sunday, so I'm going to post my first now.

    While I liked this movie, a lot of it feels like they’ve just stolen bits and pieces from other movies (Disney or otherwise). As such, it doesn’t really feel to be all that original or groundbreaking. It just kind of feels like Disney is just going through the motions with this film.


    1. and 8. My overall impression of the movie… Several things:

    This movie is full of stolen ideas/tropes/characters etc. from other movies. Here is a partial list:
    • The brotherly relationship between Tadashi and Hiro reminds me of the sisterly relationship between Nani and Lilo and the brotherly relationship between the brothers in “Brother Bear” (more later in #2). This, by itself doesn’t bother me so much (i.e., I like their relationship).
    • Misdirection seems to be a current staple in Disney movies regarding who is or isn’t really a villain (more later in #2). I will say that this movie has the distinction of having a double mislead: Professor Callaghan is assumed to be a good guy and Professor Krei is assumed to be the bad guy, when in fact it is opposite.
    • Related to this, this movie plays into the tired (at least to me) trope of academic scientists as being pure, honest, selfless, and interested in the greater good while industrial scientists are portrayed as tainted, selfish, deceitful, greedy money grubbers who are only interested in themselves and their own personal wealth. This cliché has been used in many other movies—e.g., “Looker”, “Brainstorm”, “Real Genius”, “Spiderman” (the 2002 one with Willem Dafoe as the Green Goblin), and “Avatar”. While some of these movies use the pure academics vs. evil industrials trope, other use the pure corporation R&D vs. evil military generals trope.
    • Also related to all of this is the similarities of Hans in “Frozen” to Professor Callaghan here. Both movies play really hard to get us to see both of these characters as good guys, only to pull the rug out from under our feet and make them villains. BH6 is a bit better in throwing around clues and setting a compelling motive for Callaghan’s choices (although he’s pretty cavalier about his responsibility for Tadashi’s death given how he’s so bent on holding Krei responsible for his daughter’s death—hypocritical much?).
    • Hiro riding the superhero Baymax for the first time feels like such a rip-off of Hiccup first riding Toothless in “How to Train Your Dragon” (How to Train Your Baymax?), even to the general appearance to the two main characters.

    I really hated the “last microsecond” escape of Hiro/Abagail/Baymax’s hand from the faltering and soon-to-fail portal. It’s just such a cliché that the portal lasts until just exactly the moment it was needed and then poof it’s gone. It wouldn’t feel so cliché if they even had it last a few seconds (20 or so) longer than it was needed, but as such it just feels like a coincidental contrived and trite plot point in the movie, and makes the movie seem amateurish by its use. (I’m sure I could find examples of this ‘waiting until the absolutely last second’ trope in other Disney films, but I don’t even feel like putting the time in to find parallel examples…)

    This is probably the last Stan Lee cameo in a Disney film, and I’m incredibly sad about that. It was a cool homage to the whole comic-book feel of the film and a comical nod to the tired comic-book trope that all ultra-wealthy millionaire industrialists have superhero (or supervillain) alter egos! I’m looking at you, Batman!


    2. and 8. I couldn’t decide between analyzing the character of Tadashi (Hiro’s brother, who just feels like a rip-off of Sitka, Kenai’s brother in “Brother Bear”) or Professor Krei (who just feels like a rip-off of Kerchack, the ape father of “Tarzan”). I guess I figure that two “half-analyses” will actually count as one full analysis…

    As I said, Tadashi feel just like a rehash of Sitka, Kenai’s oldest brother in “Brother Bear”. Both were the sensible and responsible brothers, compared to the younger brother (Hiro/Kenai) who is still trying to find his way in the world and decide what he wants to do for his future. Both Tadashi and Sitka bravely and nobly gave up their lives to (attempt to) save the life of another (Kenai and Danahi/Professor Callaghan). After death, both of them also served as “protectors” for their little brother (Tadashi through Baymax/Sitka through magic), and eventually the “memories” of their brothers helped the younger irresponsible brother mature and take his place in the world.

    OK, the whole Professor Krei = Kerchack from “Tarzan” is mostly about the misleading way the writers portrayed these two characters. For both of them, they felt like the “villain” at the beginning of the film, or at least not very nice people. Professor Krei is played as the stereotypical “evil industrialist” and kind of a jerk as opposed to the “pure and virtuous academic” and all-around sainted father-figure that was Professor Callaghan. The same misportrayal of evil was done for (on?) Kerchack—he was originally played as a “speciesist” jerk who doesn’t like baby Tarzan because he’s a man, and is a cold, unloving, and abusive step-father that must be tiptoed around or violence will ensue. However, as both movies progress, we find that these “bad guys” weren’t really the bad guys after all, and halfway through the movie they are now portrayed as good guys. And, to make the fact that they aren’t really villains crystal clear, we get new villains in the form of Professor Callaghan/Clayton.


    3. The sequence I chose to analyze was the whole Baymax losing power scene. It get that this scene was played for slapstick comedy, but I really felt like they went overboard. For the first few seconds, the “low battery” Baymax was simply moving and talking slow, like you’d expect a run-down device to work. But then, two second in, low battery Baymax = drunk Baymax, complete with slurred speech patterns, lack of coordination, drunken hiccup and saying ‘Weeeee’ all the time, lack of judgment or cognitive control, and impaired motor skills. I guess this would be fun/amusing for people who haven’t had to deal with constant alcoholics (like my sister’s ex-boyfriend), but Hiro trying to hide Baymax’s “drunkenness” from his Aunt just made me cringe as I relived moments of my sister dealing with her alcoholic ex… At least I did get a Baymax/Mochi moment—hairy baby! (Kitty!)


    4. There weren’t many songs in this film, so I chose to analyze the “Immortals” song. In this scene, Hiro and the “Big Hero 6” team train to be superheroes, practicing their moves to get the mask off of the bad guy. OK, yet another traditional 80’s training montage, similar to the one in “Wreck It Ralph” and about a zillion other movies since the 80’s… It was fun, I guess, but it feels stolen from other (more original) movies of the past. This wouldn’t be a problem if at least some part of this movie felt fresh or original, and not stolen or recycled from other (better) movies.

    I will say that the movie pulled a “fake-out” on me. When Hiro was trying to come up with a new idea for the science fair, they started playing “Eye of the Tiger”, and I was like… Ooh, an 80’s training montage—only to stop it about two seconds in. Well, I DID get my training montage, just a bit later in the film.


    7. (and 8.) Since this movie stole from so many movies, I guess it makes sense that its take-home messages would feel like they’ve been stolen too! I chose to see the take-home messages stolen from “Star Wars”: (1) “Your hate has made you powerful”—said by Emperor Palpatine to Luke as he fought with Darth Vader. Hiro initially uses his hate to reprogram Baymax to attack Professor Callaghan in order to kill him; the other team members actually spend their time trying to thwart Baymax’s fatal attacks against Callaghan; (2) “A Jedi uses the Force for knowledge and defense, never for attack”—said by Yoda to Luke. Once Hiro calms down (and watches the videos of his brother), he decides that the goal is not to kill Callaghan, but to protect Krei, and the Big Hero 6 fight for that more noble cause; (3) I was looking for some sort of “Star Wars” quote about revenge destroying the person seeking it (not sure if there’s an actual quote out there, but it was a big part of the whole “Star Wars” storyline!). Anyway, Hiro’s all-consuming need to avenge his brother’s death makes him rash and reckless and could lead to his (or his friend’s) death. This is mirrored by Callaghan’s whole reason to be the masked man—to avenge his daughter’s death against Krei. Once Abagail is found alive, Callaghan is relieved but he can’t go with her to the hospital in the ambulance because he is being carted off to jail, having just ruined HIS life and livelihood, all over revenge.


    9. This scene at the end of the film with Hiro hugging a newly-formed Baymax felt like a good choice to me.

    [​IMG]


    10. OK, I totally chose this button (124450) from Hot Topic, because it gets to Baymax’s primary function, and I wish it were an enamel pin. I also toyed with the whole Nurse’s Day or Doctor’s Day pins. But I have to put in this unauthorized pin also with Baymax and Mochi (113712).

    [​IMG] [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Dec 20, 2018
    coblj003 likes this.
  23. unibear

    unibear DPF Charter Member DPF Charter Member

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    OK, with that last posting I think I made my 52! Kuzco is impressed!

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Dec 23, 2018
  24. timeerkat

    timeerkat Your Friend Who Likes To Play

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    Just finished watching Big Hero 6 and watched Zootopia a few days ago; will post my reviews up tomorrow morning after I’ve slept.
     
  25. timeerkat

    timeerkat Your Friend Who Likes To Play

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    Erg, somehow my notesheets for Frozen and Zootopia went missing. :/ And ack, Christmas plans means I have to make this short, though I PROMISE I have loads more to say about this!

    1. Zoooootoooopppiiiaaaa week! :D I've been looking forward to this week all year!

    The world is IMMENSE and great care was put into world building. In order to have multiple species of all sizes interact with each other, they built the infrastructure of the world around their differences so that it was POSSIBLE for them to interact - pneumatic tubes, blowdriers, multi-leveled public transportation, etc.

    The character design is truly wonderful, and takes into account the physicality, personality, and appearance of the real animals these characters are based on. Each species even has its own unique fur texturing! It woudl have been easy for them to go the lazy road with this film, but they spent the time and resources to really make it right.

    It plays on animal stereotypes, both reinforcing them and also subverting them. The scene at the Mystic Springs Oasis demonstrates this perfectly - you have pigs wallowing in mud and bears lazing around scratching themselves on trees (a nod to Baloo in Jungle Book, perhaps), but you also have Nangi the elephant who can't remember anything about a frequent client (subverting the adage that "an elephant never forgets"). However, unlike Chicken Little where these seem forced, Zootopia's usage of this is clever and entertaining (well, the DMV scene takes a bit longer than it needs to to get the point across about sloths being slow, but it doesn't overstay its welcome).

    And BLESS the filmmakers for giving Kristen Bell the opportunity to become a sloth!



    I will say that the twist villain theme is getting a bit old at this point. After Frozen, Big Hero 6, and Wreck-It Ralph, Bellwether's reveal doesn't have the same impact. It's almost expected at this point.

    2.

    [​IMG]

    Finnick exemplifies the message that not everything is as it appears. He is little and cute, so everyone assumes that he is a child, or at least has a childlike personality. He plays this to his advantage, acting as Nick's son in their scam (dressing and acting as a kid in his Little Toot Toot outfit). In reality, he is a gruff jaded adult, not afraid to resort to violence if needed.

    5. [​IMG]

    Judy's carrot pen is not only a useful tool in her everyday job (multifunctional, as she is able to use it to take notes and also record statements), but also acts as a means for her to have some power. Once she gets to Zootopia she finds herself as a small fish in a REALLY big pond, and lacks the physical stature and personality to be seen as an authority figure. Having the recorder gives her some of this authority back, as it holds evidence that could incriminate someone. (It can also be used in other ways, such as when she tosses it over the fence, causing Nick to climb over and thus giving her probably cause to search the lot.) Again, this shows that appearances are not always what they seem.


    9. For me, it has to be when Judy is on the train that turns the corner, and we get that first grand shot of Zootopia, a grand city of so much promise, a utopian society where anyone can be anything!

    [​IMG]


    10. I went with the Beloved Tales, as it shows the scene where Judy gives her heartfelt apology to Nick, and most importantly, does not make an excuse for her actions. She takes responsibility for how she behaved, apologizes, and promises to be better in the future.

    [​IMG]

    Pin# 122643 - DSSH - Beloved Tales - Zootopia
     

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